Game Theory and Cancer

What does game theory and cancer have to do with each other. I am not sure but this interesting workshop hosted by the Princeton Physical Sciences-Oncology Center and Johns Hopkins University might help you figure that out.

An announcement about the event reads:

Screen Shot 2013-08-02 at 12.03.06 PMRegistration is now open for the Workshop on Game Theory and Cancer, scheduled on August 12-13 in Baltimore, MD, and jointly hosted by our Princeton PS-OC and Johns Hopkins University. The main goal of this workshop is to provide a dialogue between leading basic researchers and clinical investigators that would help make headway against the very stubborn problem of cancer, and to jolt the oncology community into confronting the serious clinical problems that have previously been avoided.

The flyer is pretty cool, too.  Check it out here.

Additional information and preliminary agenda can be found at: http://www.princeton.edu/psoc/training/

To register, please go to: https://prism.princeton.edu/ps-oc/regform.php

For questions about the event, email maranzam@princeton.edu or sclam@princeton.edu

Advanced Imaging Workshop: BU campus

Advanced Imaging Workshop

August 19-20, 2013,
Imaging Core Facilities, BU campus
9am – 5pm

To register, please reply to this email.

Course Directors:

Phil Allen

Jerome Mertz

Orian Shirihai

This workshop will present an overview of state-of-the-art optical microscopy techniques including phase contrast microscopy, confocal microscopy, two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF), second-harmonic generation (SHG), structured illumination microscopy (SIM), adaptive optics and light sheet microscopy. The workshop will also include topics specifically tailored to superresolution and nanoscale imaging, as well as some fundamentals, including photo physical properties of fluorescence, sensors, FRET, photo conversion and organelle tracking.

This workshop is open to students and post-docs at Boston University and other Cancer Nanotechnology Training Centers in the NCI Alliance.  Attendance is free of charge, but registration is required.  Registration is on a first come, first served basis and SPACE IS LIMITED!  

To register, please email Brenda Hugot:  bhugot@bu.edu.

 

Johns Hopkins and UVa co-host 2-day imaging workshop

Learn about state-of-the-art imaging methods at the In Vivo Preclinical Imaging: an Introductory Workshop, March 20-21 at Johns Hopkins University’s School of Medicine Turner Auditorium. Co-hosted by Johns Hopkins University, the University of Virginia and the Society of Nuclear Medicine (SNM), this workshop will bring together gifted lecturers to cover the fundamentals of in vivo small animal imaging.

The workshop will cover an incredible breadth of material of interest and value to physicians, scientists (including postdoctoral fellows and graduate students) and scientific laboratory professionals interested in using molecular imaging for in vivo biomedical applications. Individuals with experience in small animal imaging as well as beginners are welcome. Participants learn the fundamentals of various small animal imaging modalities. A limited number of participants will also have the opportunity to register to attend a half-day, hands on workshop held on the afternoon of the second day, March 21. Registration for this unique opportunity is on first-come first-served, so don’t wait to register.

Speakers will address imaging modalities including MRI and MRS, PET, SPECT, optical imaging (bioluminescence & fluorescence imaging/tomography), ultrasound, x-ray CT, photoacoustic imaging and multimodality imaging. Speakers will also examine instrumentation, acquisition and reconstruction, MR/SPECT/PET imaging probes, targets and applications, small animal handling, techniques for imaging infectious disease models and data analysis.

More information about the workshop, including a full agenda of topics, registration and details about transportation and lodging can be found at the workshop website. www.snm.org/pci2012.

 

Agenda, workshops set for Johns Hopkins cancer nanotech symposium

Hands-on workshops are part of this year’s INBT symposium. (Photo: Marty Katz/baltimorephotographer.com)

Cancer Nanotechnology forms  the focus of the fifth annual symposium for Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology (INBT), May 12 and 13, 2011 at the university’s Homewood campus. Friday, May 13 will feature a symposium with talks from a slate of faculty experts in nanotechnology, oncology, engineering and medicine, while hands-on workshops will be offered to small groups on Thursday, May 12.

Registration begins at 8:30 a.m. in Shriver Hall Auditorium. A poster session begins at 1:30 p.m. upstairs in the Clipper Room showcasing research from INBT affiliated faculty laboratories across several Johns Hopkins University divisions. Past symposiums have attracted as many as 500 attendees and more than 100 research posters. To register and to submit a poster, click here.

Agenda

Cancer Nanotechnology: The annual symposium of Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology

May 13, 2011, Shriver Hall

8:30-9:00 am: Registration, Lobby of Shriver Hall

9:00-9:05 am: Welcome/Introduction of Speakers, Denis Wirtz

9:05-9:35 am: “Why develop sensitive detection systems for abnormal DNA methylation in cancer?”

Stephen Baylin is Deputy Director, Professor of Oncology and Medicine, Chief of the Cancer Biology Division and Director for Research of The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins.

9:35-9:55 am: “Enabling cancer drug delivery using nanoparticles”

Anirban Maitra is a professor at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine with appointments in Pathology and Oncology at the Sol Goldman Pancreatic Research Center and secondary appointments in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at the Whiting School of Engineering and the McKusick-Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine. Maitra co-directs Johns Hopkins Cancer Nanotechnology Training Center and is a project director in the CCNE.

9:55-10:15 am: “Epithelial Morphogenesis in Cancer Metastasis”

Gregory Longmore is a professor at the Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Oncology Division, Molecular Oncology Section and the Department of Cell Biology and Physiology. Longmore is a project co-director at Johns Hopkins Physical Sciences-Oncology Center (PS-OC).

10:15-10:35 am: “A Translational Nanoparticle-Based Imaging Method for Cancer”

Martin Pomper is a professor at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine with a primary appointment in Radiology and secondary appointments in Oncology, Radiation Oncology, and Pharmacology and Molecular Sciences, as well as Environmental Health Sciences at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Pomper co-directs Johns Hopkins Center of Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence (CCNE)

10:35-10:50 am: Break

10:50-10:55 am: Welcome/Introduction of Speakers, Anirban Maitra

10:55-11:15 am: “Cancer Cell Motility in 3-D”

Denis Wirtz is the Theophilus H. Smoot Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering in the Whiting School of Engineering at Johns Hopkins University. Wirtz is associate director of INBT and director of the Johns Hopkins Physical Sciences-Oncology Center, also known as the Engineering in Oncology Center. He has a secondary appointment in Oncology at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.

11:15-11:35 am: “MRI as a Tool for Developing Vaccine Adjuvants”

Hy Levitsky is a professor of Oncology, Medicine and Urology at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and the Scientific Director of the George Santos Bone Marrow Transplant Program. Levitsky is a project director at the Center of Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence (CCNE).

11:35-11:55 am: “Genetically Encodable FRET-based Biosensors for probing signaling dynamics”

Jin Zhang is an associate professor at Solomon H. Snyder Department of Neuroscience at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine with primary appointments in Pharmacology and Molecular Sciences and secondary appointments in Neuroscience, Oncology, and Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering.

11:55-12:00 pm: Adjourn/Concluding Remarks, Thomas Fekete, director of corporate partnerships, INBT

12:00-1:30 pm: Break

1:30-3:30 pm: Research Poster Session, Clipper Room, Shriver Hall

Workshops give hands-on experience to nano-bio researchers

In conjunction with the fifth annual symposium talks and poster session, Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology will hold hands-on laboratory workshops to introduce some of the methods developed by affiliated faculty. Space is limited to participate in the workshops, which will be held the afternoon of May 12 at INBT’s headquarters in Suite 100 of the New Engineering Building. Times, instructors and topics are listed below. If you are interested in signing up for one or more of the workshops, please contact INBT’s administrative coordinator Tracy Smith at TracyINBT@jhu.edu or call 410-516-5634.

For more information about INBT’s symposium go to: http://inbt.jhu.edu/outreach/symposium/twentyeleven/

Session A: 1-3 pm

1. Electrospinning of polymeric nanofibers for tissue engineering application: Nanofibrous materials are increasingly used in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications and for local delivery of therapeutic agents. Electrospinning is the most widely used method for producing nanofiber matrices because of its high versatility and capacity to generate nanofibers from a variety of polymer solutions or melts. It can generate fibers with diameters ranging from tens of nanometers to a few microns. This workshop will review the basic principle of electrospinning, investigate the effect of several key parameters on fiber generation, demonstrate the method to generate nanofiber mesh and nanofiber conduits, and discuss the potential applications for tissue engineering and repair.

Instructors: Russell Martin and Hai-Quan Mao (Mao Lab)

2. Particle tracking microrheology: This hands-on course will teach participants the fundamentals and applications of high-throughput approaches to cytometry, including cell morphometry and microrheology. These approaches are being used for rapid phenotyping of cancer cells.

Instructors: Wei-Chiang Chen, Pei-Hsun Wu, and Denis Wirtz (Wirtz Lab)

Session B: 3:30-5:30 pm

3. Synthesis of quantum dots for bioengineering: This workshop will provide a hands-on approach to the synthesis of CdSe QD cores and how to purify these cores from excess surfactant. A brief discussion how to successfully electrically passivate the cores will follow. Participants will be able to water solubilize core/shell QDs using pegylated lipids. Several methods for characterizing the QDs through the synthesis and water solubilization will be performed.

Instructors: Charli Dvoracek, Justin Galloway, and Jeaho Park (Searson Lab)

4. Microfluidics for studying cell adhesion: This workshop will focus on fabrication of an “artificial blood vessel” via photolithography to generate a micron-sized (cross-section) channel. The micro-channel will be connected to a syringe pump to initiate fluid flow simulating the blood flow inside a blood vessel. This tool can be used to study how cancer cells interact with “blood vessel” surface when coated with adhesion proteins.

Instructors: Tommy Tong and Eric Balzer (K. Konstantopoulos Lab)

Story by Mary Spiro