Environmental applications of nanotechnology discussed March 15

Colloids in porous media (Keller Lab/UCSB)

The Johns Hopkins University Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering hosts the M. Gordon Wolman Seminar Series, Tues., March 15 at 3 p.m. in Ames 234 with Arturo Keller of University of California, Santa Barbara. Keller will present the talk “Environmental Applications of Nanotechnolgy.

Abstract

Currently, nanotechnology is being used to monitor environmental pollutants as well as to remediate various environmental problems. Nanotechnology will help to develop new environmentally safe and green technologies that can minimize the formation of undesirable by-products or effluents. Nanotechnology is already being utilized to improve water quality and to assist in environmental clean-up issues. Environmental sensors to monitor pollutants are also becoming available. The seminar will explore these and other environmental applications of nanotechnology.

Bio
Arturo Keller is Professor at the Bren School of Environmental Science and Management at UC Santa Barbara, and the Associate Director of the UC Center for the Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology. He has a background is in Chemical Engineering, followed by a PhD in Environmental Engineering from Stanford University. He worked in industry for 11 years between his undergrad and graduate degree.

M. Gordon Wolman Seminar Series

 

Gerecht wins NSF CAREER Award for work in blood vessel formation

Sharon Gerecht (Photo:Will Kirk/JHU)

Sharon Gerecht, assistant professor in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at Johns Hopkins University, has been awarded the Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Award from the National Science Foundation. The $450,000 prize over five years will help Gerecht in her investigation into how hypoxia, or decreased oxygen, affects the development of blood vessels.

Gerecht’s interdisciplinary research brings together her expertise in stem cell and vascular biology with her background in engineering.  Gerecht said she hopes to discover the mechanisms and pathways involved in the formation of vascular networks, as they relate to embryonic development and diseases such as cancer.

Many medical conditions, such as cancer and heart disease, create areas of decreased oxygen or hypoxia in the spaces between cells. But oxygen is required to maintain normal tissue function by blood vessel networks, which bring nutrients to cells. Likewise, the differentiation of stem cells into more complex organs and structures needs a plentiful supply of oxygen from the vasculature to function.

Gerecht’s study will examine how low oxygen levels impact the growth factors responsible for promoting vascular networks. She also will study the growth of vascular networks in engineered hydrogels that mimic the physical attributes of the extracellular matrix, which is the framework upon which cells divide and grow. Finally, her laboratory will focus on discovering how stem cells differentiate to blood vessel cells and assemble into networks under hypoxic conditions.

She will conduct her research through her role as a project director at the Johns Hopkins Engineering in Oncology Center (EOC), a Physical Science-Oncology Center of the National Cancer Institute. Gerecht is also an associated faculty member of the Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology, which administers the EOC.

Gerecht earned her doctoral degree from Technion – Israel Institute of Technology followed by postdoctoral training at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She joined the faculty of the Whiting School of Engineering at Johns Hopkins in 2007.

The prestigious CAREER award, given to faculty members at the beginning of their academic careers, is one of NSF’s most competitive awards and emphasizes high-quality research and novel education initiatives. It provides funding so that young investigators have the opportunity to focus more intently on furthering their research careers.

Story by Mary Spiro

Festival draws half a million fans of science and engineering

Charli Dvoracek shows off some nanoparticles at the USA Science & Engineering Festival. (Photo: Mary Spiro)

The scene was a sea of white tents spread across the National Mall in Washington, DC and science and engineering were the order of the day. That’s what greeted visitors to the booth hosted by Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology at the first USA Science & Engineering Festival Expo, held October 23-24.

An estimated 500,000 people attended the two-day event, which featured 550 participating organizations and 1,500 hands-on activities. Those who stopped by INBT’s “Nano-Magic” booth learned about how atoms, molecules and materials have ways of building structures all by themselves.

Twelve graduate students affiliated with INBT training programs and a handful of friends of the Institute volunteered to help visitors understand the science. In addition, several of the research and news videos created by INBT’s Animation Studio were on display throughout the day.

An estimated 500 to 600 people came to the INBT booth and spent from 5 to 20 minutes discussing nanotechnology, Johns Hopkins research, and INBT’s training programs. This first-ever event was a major outreach opportunity for INBT and one of the first times the Institute has had a public display of this kind.

Tania Chan working with youngsters at the USASEF. (Photo: Mary Spiro)“Outreach serves an important purpose,” said Denis Wirtz, INBT’s associate director and professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering who came out Saturday to assist with the demonstration. “It showcases the interdisciplinary nature of INBT’s work to a broad audience. But it also gives the students an opportunity to explain their research in an accessible way. These outreach activities are a requirement of their training program grants, but this skill will also help them in their future careers when explaining their work to funding sources.”

USA Science and Engineering Festival organizers have not announced whether or not they will host another event like this one next year. INBT leaders indicate, however, that they will be interested in participating in this or similar events in the future.

Six exhibitors from Johns Hopkins presented at the USA Science and Engineering Festival. Along with INBT, they included representatives from the Institute for Data Intensive Engineering and Science and the department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering from the Whiting School of Engineering and the undergraduate program in neuroscience, the department of Physics and Astronomy, and the Institute for Biophysical Research from the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences.

USA Science and Engineering Festival Website

Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology

Hopkins Biomaterials Day Symposium Oct. 29

Click here to view flyer.

Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology is a sponsor of the annual Biomaterials Day Symposium to be held Friday, Oct. 29 , from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. in Charles Commons at the Homewood campus.

The goal of this of regional mini-symposium is to show-case all biomaterials related research happening at Johns Hopkins University, University of Maryland, and Pennsylvania State University, to stimulate further collaborations among peers, and to promote student participation in biomaterials research at all levels. Several keynote speakers will be giving talks on various aspects of biomaterials science, engineering and applications.

Join INBT, JHU and our neighboring research universities for this day-long event. You and your lab are invited to share your work on biomaterials at this symposium. Previously presented research may be presented here again. The registration is free and lunch is included.

Society for Biomaterials

INBT’s international research program sends second team of students to Belgium

Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology supports university students to conduct research in an international setting. Their work, travel and housing expenses are funded through INBT with a National Science Foundation’s International Research Experience for Students (IRES) program and through a partnership with The Inter-University MircroElectronics Centre (IMEC) in Leuven, Belgium.

This summer, two Whiting School of Engineering students, Mike Keung, a master’s student in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, and Kayla Culver, a recent bachelor’s graduate in Materials Science and Engineering, spent the summer conducting research at IMEC. Additional Johns Hopkins students will be traveling to Belgium later in the year.

“Students work at IMEC’s world-class microfabrication facility and learn to design, fabricate and test chip-based platforms and integrated microelectronic systems for biomedical applications,” said INBT director Peter Searson, the Joseph R. and Lynn C. Reynolds Professor of Materials Science and Engineering. “The goal of the program is to help students gain a broader, global perspective of science and technology.”

IMEC performs world-leading research in nano-electronics and nano-technology with a staff of more than 1,750 people, including 550 industrial residents and guest researchers. The research is applied to healthcare, electronics, sustainable energy, and transportation.

Keung and Culver maintained blogs about their experiences in Europe and at IMEC. Keung, who also worked at IMEC last year through the IRES program, has written his blog for two years in a row. The blogs, reflect both the rich educational and cultural experience that the IRES program is intended to provide for participants. For example, both students conducted experiments that will enhance their careers and skill sets, as well as support the research goals of their mentors both at Johns Hopkins and at IMEC. But Keung and Culver also had the opportunity to be immersed in a different culture, travel to nearby cities and countries, and practice collaborating with scientists from around the world.

For more information about INBT IRES program click here.

Clikc on the images below to check out Mike’s and Kayla’s blogs!

 

Mike Keung’s IMEC Blog

Kayla Culver’s IMEC Blog

Story by Mary Spiro

INBT welcomes 16 summer nanobio research interns

For 10 weeks this summer, 16 students from universities across the country will join the highly competitive Johns Hopkins Institute for Nanobiotechnology (INBT) Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU). The internship is funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and is supported and administered by INBT.

This is the third year of INBT’s REU program, and this group represents the institute’s largest group. Students are being mentored by faculty, graduate students and postdoctoral fellows in INBT affiliated laboratories across Hopkins. At the end of the 10-week research program, they will present their findings at a university-wide collaborative research poster session held with other summer interns from across several divisions.

In November 2009, NSF reported that over the last decade 10 times more white students will have earned doctoral degrees in science and engineering disciplines than minority students. Acknowledging this fact yet resolving not to accept it as status quo, INBT has employed aggressive measures to increase the number of individuals from underrepresented groups who apply to its educational programs.

“The nanobiotechnology REU has been one of the most successful and popular programs for INBT,” says Ashanti Edwards, senior education program coordinator for the institute. “The program has consistently attracted the best and the brightest students interested in research from top universities across the nation. The REU program was launched as a conduit to attract highly talented and motivated research students to pursue academic careers in research, particularly women and minority scholars. The program is highly competitive. For summer 2010, the number of applicants for the 10 slots in the program rose to nearly 500, twice what it had been the year before.”

Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology Summer REU Students. (Photos by Mary Spiro)

INBT’s summer 2010 REU students include pictured from top to bottom, from left to right:

Top row

Joshua Austin, computer science and math major from UMBC, is working with Jeff Gray, associate professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering, Whiting School of Engineering.

Mary Bedard, biochemistry and Spanish major from Elon University, is working with J.D. Tovar, assistant professor of chemistry, Krieger School of Arts and Sciences.

Kameron Black, neuroscience major from the University of California, Riverside, is working in the lab of Ted Dawson, professor of neuroscience, School of Medicine

Obafemi Ifelowo, who majors in molecular biology, biochemistry and bioinformatics at Towson University, is working with Jordan Green, assistant professor of biomedical engineering, School of Medicine.

Second row

Alfred Irungu, mechanical engineering major at UMBC, is working with German Drazer, assistant professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering, Whiting School of Engineering.

Ceslee Montgomery, human biology major from Stanford University, is working in the lab of Doug Robinson, associate professor of cell biology, School of Medicine.

Makeda Moore, biology major from Alabama A & M University, is working with Sharon Gerecht, assistant professor of chemical and biomolecular Engineering, Whiting School of Engineering.

Christopher Ojeda, biomedical engineering major from New Jersey Institute of Technology, is working in the lab of Michael Yu, assistant professor of Materials Science and Engineering, Whiting School of Engineering.

Third row

Katrin Passlack, mechanical engineering and kinesiology major at the University of Oklahoma, is working with Jeff Wang, associate professor of mechanical engineering, Whiting School of Engineering.

Roberto Rivera, chemical engineering major from the University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez, is working in the lab of Nina Markovic, associate professor of physics, Krieger School of Arts and Sciences.

D. Kyle Robinson, bioengineering major from Oregon State University, is working in the lab of Denis Wirtz, professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering, Whiting School of Engineering. In addition, Kyle is the first REU intern for Johns Hopkins new Engineering in Oncology Center, of which Wirtz is director.

Russell Salamo, biology major from the University of Arkansas, is working with Kalina Hristova, associate professor of materials science and engineering, Whiting School of Engineering.

Bottom row

Quinton Smith, major in chemical engineering with a bioengineering concentration from the University of New Mexico, is working with Sharon Gerecht, assistant professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering, Whiting School of Engineering.

David To, chemistry major from Wittenberg University, is working with assistant professor Hai-Quan Mao in the department of materials science and engineering, Whiting School of Engineering.

Alan Winter, biology systems engineering major from Kansas State University, is working with Professor Peter Searson in the department of materials science and engineering, Whiting School of Engineering. Searson is the director of INBT.

Mary Zuniga, biology major a Northern Arizona University, is working in the lab of David Gracias, associate professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering, Whiting School of Engineering.

Related Links:

Johns Hopkins NanoBio Research Experience for Undergraduates

Hopkins biomedical engineering doctoral student wins Weintraub Award

Deok-Ho Kim

Deok-Ho Kim, currently a postdoctoral fellow in the department of Biomedical Engineering, was among 13 graduate students from North America chosen to receive the 2010 Harold M. Weintraub Graduate Student Award, sponsored by the Basic Sciences Division of Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, Wash. Nominations were solicited internationally and winners were selected on the basis of the quality, originality and significance of their work.

The award, established in 2000, honors the late Harold M. Weintraub, Ph.D., a founding member of the FHC’s Basic Sciences Division, who in 1995 died from brain cancer at age 49. According to a press release from FHC, “Weintraub was an international leader in the field of molecular biology; among his many contributions, he identified genes responsible for instructing cells to differentiate, or develop, into specific tissues such as muscle and bone.”

Kim will receive a certificate, travel expenses and an honorarium from the Weintraub and Groudine Fund, established to foster intellectual exchange through the promotion of programs for graduate students, fellows and visiting scholars. Kim works in the laboratory of Andre Levchenko, associate professor of biomedical engineering at Johns Hopkins University’s Whiting School of Engineering and an affiliated faculty member of the Institute for NanoBioTechnology.

Read more about Kim’s research with Levchenko here.