Rong Li to give keynote talk at March 11 grad symposium

Rong Li, a Bloomberg Distinguished Professor of Cell Biology and Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and Whiting School of Engineering, will present the keynote talk at the Friday, March 11 graduate student organized symposium for Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology. The event will be held from 12:30 to 4 p.m. in the Sherwood Room in Levering Hall on the Homewood campus of the university.

Twice a year, the graduate students of INBT coordinate a half-day symposium to feature the work of their colleagues. Aside from the faculty keynote address, all talks are given by pre-doctoral candidates or postdocs from INBT affiliate laboratories. This event is free and open to the Hopkins community.

INBT Mini Symposium Flyer

The agenda and talk titles are as follows:

12:30-1:00PM: Food, Coffee, Networking
1:00-1:10PM: Introductory remarks by Jackson Destefano and Jacob Sarnecki
1:10-1:30PM: Ran Lin, “Supramolecular drug ampiphile hydrogels for local therapy”
1:30-1:50PM: Herdeline Ardona, “Demonstration of energy transfer within self-assembling bioelectronic hydrogelators with tunable properties”
1:50-2:10PM: Lindsay Clegg, “Extracellular matrix binding regulates VEGF signaling and effectiveness of pro-angiogenic therapy”
2:10-2:30PM: Nash Rochman (NTCR Fellow), “Noise: Music to my ears”
2:30-3:00PM: Sarah Kim, “Design of pH-triggered, macromolecular pore-forming peptides for endosomal escape”
3:00-4:00PM: Rong Li, “Cell dynamics in space, time and evolution”



Gerecht to present Frontier Award Lecture Dec. 1

Sharon Gerecht, Kent Gordon Croft Investment Management Faculty Scholar and associate professor in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, will present the Inaugural President’s Frontier Award Lecture at 11 a.m. on Tuesday, Dec. 1 in Mason Hall Auditorium. A reception will follow.

Sharon Gerecht

Sharon Gerecht

Gerecht is a bioengineer whose research focuses on using engineering fundamentals to study basic questions in stem cell biology in order to regenerate and repair damaged blood vessels and halt the spread of cancer.

In January, Gerecht became the first winner of the $250,000 President’s Frontier Award. She will become an associate director of the Institute for Nanobiotechnology in January.

Konstantopoulos to present distinguished lecture on tumor cell migration

Biomedical Engineering 8 5 x 11 4-7Biomedical Engineering 8 5 x 11 4-7Biomedical Engineering 8 5 x 11 4-7Professor and Chair of the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Konstantinos Konstantopoulos will present a distinguished lecture for the Department of Biomedical Engineering on Monday, April 7 at 4 p.m. in the Mason Hall Auditorium on the Homewood campus of Johns Hopkins University.  His talk. “Joining Forces with Biology: A Bioengineering Perspective on Tumor Cell Migration,” will reveal some of his laboratory’s current findings on metastasis. The talk is free and open the Johns Hopkins University community. Refreshments follow the lecture.

Here’s the abstract of his talk:

“Understanding the mechanisms of cell migration is a fundamental question in cell, developmental and cancer biology. Unraveling key, physiologically relevant motility mechanisms is also crucial for developing technologies that can control, manipulate, promote or stop cell migration in vivo. Much of what we know about the mechanisms of cell migration stems from in vitro studies using two-dimensional (2D) surfaces. Cell locomotion in 2D is driven by cycles of actin protrusion, integrin-mediated adhesion and myosin-dependent contraction. A major pitfall of 2D assays is that they fail to account for the physical confinement that cells  encounter within the physiological tissue environment. The seminar will challenge the conventional wisdom regarding cell motility mechanisms, and show that migration through physically constricted spaces does not require beta1 integrin dependent adhesion or myosin contractility. Importantly, confined migration persists even when filamentous actin is disrupted. This seminar will also discuss a novel mechanism of confined cell migration based on an osmotic en

Young, global entrepreneur to speak Dec. 12

The Center for Bioengineering Innovation and Design (CBID) hosts a guest speaker on  Wednesday, December 12, from 12:30 to 2 p.m. in Clark Hall 110 at the Johns Hopkins University Homewood campus.

Jodie Wu, founder/CEO, Global Cycle Solutions

Jodie Wu, founder and CEO of Global Cycle Solutions, will present: “Engineer to Entrepreneur: Starting a business in Africa at Age 22,: in which she will discuss the journey of Global Cycle Solutions, its history, its vision, its operations, and how it became what it is today.

In 2009, Wu at age 22, officially became a full-fledged entrepreneur, packing her bags and moving to Tanzania. Wu will talk about her journey from engineer to entrepreneur and give the insider story of taking her company Global Cycle Solutions, from the classroom to the field.

In addition, Wu will share her fantastic “failures”, the challenges of selling products to the world’s bottom billion, and her vision for the future now that her company has sold over 13,000 products across East Africa and is now operationally break even.

This talk is free and open to the Johns Hopkins community.


Johns Hopkins and UVa co-host 2-day imaging workshop

Learn about state-of-the-art imaging methods at the In Vivo Preclinical Imaging: an Introductory Workshop, March 20-21 at Johns Hopkins University’s School of Medicine Turner Auditorium. Co-hosted by Johns Hopkins University, the University of Virginia and the Society of Nuclear Medicine (SNM), this workshop will bring together gifted lecturers to cover the fundamentals of in vivo small animal imaging.

The workshop will cover an incredible breadth of material of interest and value to physicians, scientists (including postdoctoral fellows and graduate students) and scientific laboratory professionals interested in using molecular imaging for in vivo biomedical applications. Individuals with experience in small animal imaging as well as beginners are welcome. Participants learn the fundamentals of various small animal imaging modalities. A limited number of participants will also have the opportunity to register to attend a half-day, hands on workshop held on the afternoon of the second day, March 21. Registration for this unique opportunity is on first-come first-served, so don’t wait to register.

Speakers will address imaging modalities including MRI and MRS, PET, SPECT, optical imaging (bioluminescence & fluorescence imaging/tomography), ultrasound, x-ray CT, photoacoustic imaging and multimodality imaging. Speakers will also examine instrumentation, acquisition and reconstruction, MR/SPECT/PET imaging probes, targets and applications, small animal handling, techniques for imaging infectious disease models and data analysis.

More information about the workshop, including a full agenda of topics, registration and details about transportation and lodging can be found at the workshop website.