Heart scar tissue may take active role in promoting deadly arrhythmias

Susan Thompson, PhD student in biomedical engineering, and Craig Copeland, PhD student in physics and astronomy, observe a single non-beating heart cell called a myofibroblast growing on a micropost device. (Photo Jay VanRensselaer)

Johns Hopkins University biomedical engineers and physicists affiliated with the Institute for NanoBioTechnology have completed a study that suggests that mechanical forces exerted by cells that build scar tissue following a heart attack may later disrupt rhythms of beating heart cells and trigger deadly arrhythmias. Their findings, published in a recent issue of the journal Circulation, could result in a new target for heart disease therapies.

Principal investigator Leslie Tung, a School of Medicine professor in the department of biomedical engineering, led a team that looked at how heart cells that beat (called “cardiomyocytes”) were affected by the non-beating cells (called “myofibroblasts”). Myofibroblasts are called to arms at the site of injury following a heart attack.

“The role of the myofibroblast (non-beating cells) is to make the injured area as small as possible. Through contraction, the myofibroblasts close the wound and lay down a protein matrix to reduce the scar area,” said lead investigator Susan Thompson, a pre-doctoral fellow in Tung’s Cardiac Bioelectric Systems Laboratory. “In doing so, the myofibroblasts pull on the membranes of adjacent cardiomyocytes. We found that these forces were strong enough to decrease the electrical activity of the working heart cells through mechanical coupling.”

Thompson electrically stimulated cultures containing both the beating and non-beating cells growing together, and found that when the electrical impulses occurred, the non-beating myofibroblasts pulled on the membranes of beating cardiomyocytes and disturbed their electrical rhythm. Before this study, scientists were aware that myofibroblasts influenced the function of cardiomyocytes by depositing scar tissue, which produces regions of poor or no conductivity in healing cardiac tissue. But the “pulling” scenario described by Tung’s group indicates that myofibroblasts play a more active role than previously realized, Thompson said.

Biomedical engineering professor Leslie Tung collaborated with physics professor Daniel Reich to understand how heart scar tissue actively contributes to deadly arrhythmias. (Photo by Jay VanRensselaer)

In fact, images created using a voltage-sensitive dye showed that the spread of electrical waves was greatly impaired in the cultures with the most non-beating cells. Electrical conduction improved significantly, however, when drugs were added that inhibited contraction or that blocked so called “mechano-sensitive” channels.

“This is a truly exciting discovery because it radically affects our way of thinking about how cardiac arrhythmias might arise,” Tung said.

Tung and Thompson wanted to find out how strong the forces exerted by the myofibroblasts were and whether they changed when certain drugs were added. So they turned for answers to Daniel Reich, professor and chair of the Henry A. Rowland Department of Physics and Astronomy in the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences, and his pre-doctoral student Craig Copeland.

To measure the strength of the contractile forces of the myofibroblasts, the team used a device made up of a platform comprising an array of flexible “microposts.” The array resembled a carpet with widely spaced fibers upon which single cells can grow. As the cells responded to their environment, they pulled on the posts. How much the posts bent provided data about the direction and strength of forces exerted. Single layers of myofibroblasts were grown on the micropost device and tested in the presence of the same compounds Thompson used in her conductivity experiments.

“Imagine gripping a basketball with one hand, palm facing downward,” Copeland said. “The forces you apply to the ball with your fingertips to keep it suspended are similar to the forces cells exert on their environment. If you were to place your hand on a bed of rubber nails and apply the same gripping force with your fingertips as you did with the basketball, the nails would bend and their tips be deflected. This is exactly what happens with cells cultured on the post arrays.”

Thompson also explained that scientists previously thought that non-beating cells affected the beating cells simply through openings called “gap junctions,” where the two cells came into physical contact. The greater electrical charge of the myofibroblasts would flow passively downhill through the gap junctions toward the cardiomyocytes and disrupt their rhythms.

Photo by Jay VanRensselaer

The group’s new hypothesis suggests another type of membrane channel opened by physical force—the mechano-sensitive channels—may be more important in regulating electrical activity of the cardiomyocytes than mere junctions connecting membranes.

The results of both the conductivity and the micropost experiments fully support this new hypothesis, the team said. Although they acknowledge that both the passive gap channels and the active pulling forces can explain how myofibroblasts affect the electrical activity of cardiomyocytes, the researchers believe the pulling forces could be more relevant to the development of deadly arrhythmias.

“We are not ruling out the current theory,” Thompson said. “But we are saying there is something else we should be looking at, and we think the pulling forces are a major component. This could provide another lane of therapeutic investigation, especially if drugs could be targeted specifically to the contraction of the myofibroblasts.”

The next step in the project will be to combine the micropost device with electrical experiments on cultures containing cardiomyocyte and myofibroblast cell pairs.

“Although technically quite challenging, it will allow us to unravel how pulling forces applied by the myofibroblast to the cardiomyocyte affects the cardiomyocyte’s electrical activity,” said Tung.

Both Tung and Reich are affiliated faculty members of Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology. Thompson and Copeland are INBT fellows in the institute’s Integrative Graduated Education and Research Traineeship (IGERT), funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF). The National Institutes of Health, American Heart Association and the NSF IGERT funded their work. Findings were published in the May 17, 2011 issue of the journal Circulation.

Story by Mary Spiro

Photos by Jay VanRenesselaer/Homewood Photography

Nanobio interns begin work in Hopkins labs

This week, 14 students from universities across the country began 10 weeks of laboratory work as part of the Johns Hopkins Institute for Nanobiotechnology (INBT) Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program. The National Science Foundation (NSF) funded REU is supported and administered by INBT.

This is the fourth year INBT has hosted REU students, which pairs undergraduates with faculty, graduate students and postdoctoral fellows in laboratories across the Hopkins campuses. At the end of their research experience, students present their findings at a university-wide collaborative research poster session held with other summer interns from across several divisions. They also have a better understanding of what it takes to  be a full-time academic researcher.

Although all students are working in INBT affiliated laboratories, five students involved in the REU this summer will be specifically conducting research as part of Johns Hopkins Physical Sciences-Oncology Center (PS-OC). The PS-OC, also known as Johns Hopkins Enginering in Oncology Center, emphasizes the use of the physical sciences in the study of the spread and development of cancer. Three students will work in labs associated with the Center of Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence (CCNE)

Another goal of the NSF-based program is to encourage students from under represented groups, such as women and minorities, to follow career paths that include academic science or engineering research. INBT’s nanobio REU has been particularly popular, attracting several hundred applications to its highly competitive program each year.

Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology 2011 REUs include:

Mary Bedard, Elon University (J.D. Tovar Lab, Chemistry)

Lyndsey Brightful, Hampton University (Margarita Herrera-Alonso Lab, Materials Science and Engineering)

Erin Heim, University of Florida (Denis Wirtz Lab/PSOC, Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering)

Benjamin Hendricks, Purdue University (Nitish Thakor Lab, Biomedical Engineering)

Jennifer Hernandez Muniz, University of Puerto Rico (Warren Grayson Lab, Biomedical Engineering)

Alyssa Kosmides, Rutgers University (Jordan Green Lab, Biomedical Engineering)

Allatah Mekile, East Stroudburg University (Jeff Wang Lab/CCNE, Mechanical Engineering)

Evelyn Okeke, City University of New York (Doug Robinson Lab, Cell Biology)

Thea Roper, North Carolina State University (Sharon Gerecht Lab/PSOC, Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering)

Nailah Seale, Howard University (Warren Grayson Lab, Biomedical Engineering)

Justin Samorajski, University of Dallas (Peter Searson Lab/CCNE, Materials Science and Engineering)

Quinton Smith, University of New Mexico (Sharon Gerecht Lab/PSOC, Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering)

Diane H. Yoon, Rice University (Hai-Quan Mao Lab, Materials Science and Engineering)

Mary Zuniga, Northern Arizona University (David Gracias Lab, Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering).

Story and photos by Mary Spiro

 

 

 

Agenda, workshops set for Johns Hopkins cancer nanotech symposium

Hands-on workshops are part of this year’s INBT symposium. (Photo: Marty Katz/baltimorephotographer.com)

Cancer Nanotechnology forms  the focus of the fifth annual symposium for Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology (INBT), May 12 and 13, 2011 at the university’s Homewood campus. Friday, May 13 will feature a symposium with talks from a slate of faculty experts in nanotechnology, oncology, engineering and medicine, while hands-on workshops will be offered to small groups on Thursday, May 12.

Registration begins at 8:30 a.m. in Shriver Hall Auditorium. A poster session begins at 1:30 p.m. upstairs in the Clipper Room showcasing research from INBT affiliated faculty laboratories across several Johns Hopkins University divisions. Past symposiums have attracted as many as 500 attendees and more than 100 research posters. To register and to submit a poster, click here.

Agenda

Cancer Nanotechnology: The annual symposium of Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology

May 13, 2011, Shriver Hall

8:30-9:00 am: Registration, Lobby of Shriver Hall

9:00-9:05 am: Welcome/Introduction of Speakers, Denis Wirtz

9:05-9:35 am: “Why develop sensitive detection systems for abnormal DNA methylation in cancer?”

Stephen Baylin is Deputy Director, Professor of Oncology and Medicine, Chief of the Cancer Biology Division and Director for Research of The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins.

9:35-9:55 am: “Enabling cancer drug delivery using nanoparticles”

Anirban Maitra is a professor at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine with appointments in Pathology and Oncology at the Sol Goldman Pancreatic Research Center and secondary appointments in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at the Whiting School of Engineering and the McKusick-Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine. Maitra co-directs Johns Hopkins Cancer Nanotechnology Training Center and is a project director in the CCNE.

9:55-10:15 am: “Epithelial Morphogenesis in Cancer Metastasis”

Gregory Longmore is a professor at the Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Oncology Division, Molecular Oncology Section and the Department of Cell Biology and Physiology. Longmore is a project co-director at Johns Hopkins Physical Sciences-Oncology Center (PS-OC).

10:15-10:35 am: “A Translational Nanoparticle-Based Imaging Method for Cancer”

Martin Pomper is a professor at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine with a primary appointment in Radiology and secondary appointments in Oncology, Radiation Oncology, and Pharmacology and Molecular Sciences, as well as Environmental Health Sciences at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Pomper co-directs Johns Hopkins Center of Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence (CCNE)

10:35-10:50 am: Break

10:50-10:55 am: Welcome/Introduction of Speakers, Anirban Maitra

10:55-11:15 am: “Cancer Cell Motility in 3-D”

Denis Wirtz is the Theophilus H. Smoot Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering in the Whiting School of Engineering at Johns Hopkins University. Wirtz is associate director of INBT and director of the Johns Hopkins Physical Sciences-Oncology Center, also known as the Engineering in Oncology Center. He has a secondary appointment in Oncology at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.

11:15-11:35 am: “MRI as a Tool for Developing Vaccine Adjuvants”

Hy Levitsky is a professor of Oncology, Medicine and Urology at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and the Scientific Director of the George Santos Bone Marrow Transplant Program. Levitsky is a project director at the Center of Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence (CCNE).

11:35-11:55 am: “Genetically Encodable FRET-based Biosensors for probing signaling dynamics”

Jin Zhang is an associate professor at Solomon H. Snyder Department of Neuroscience at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine with primary appointments in Pharmacology and Molecular Sciences and secondary appointments in Neuroscience, Oncology, and Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering.

11:55-12:00 pm: Adjourn/Concluding Remarks, Thomas Fekete, director of corporate partnerships, INBT

12:00-1:30 pm: Break

1:30-3:30 pm: Research Poster Session, Clipper Room, Shriver Hall

Workshops give hands-on experience to nano-bio researchers

In conjunction with the fifth annual symposium talks and poster session, Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology will hold hands-on laboratory workshops to introduce some of the methods developed by affiliated faculty. Space is limited to participate in the workshops, which will be held the afternoon of May 12 at INBT’s headquarters in Suite 100 of the New Engineering Building. Times, instructors and topics are listed below. If you are interested in signing up for one or more of the workshops, please contact INBT’s administrative coordinator Tracy Smith at TracyINBT@jhu.edu or call 410-516-5634.

For more information about INBT’s symposium go to: http://inbt.jhu.edu/outreach/symposium/twentyeleven/

Session A: 1-3 pm

1. Electrospinning of polymeric nanofibers for tissue engineering application: Nanofibrous materials are increasingly used in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications and for local delivery of therapeutic agents. Electrospinning is the most widely used method for producing nanofiber matrices because of its high versatility and capacity to generate nanofibers from a variety of polymer solutions or melts. It can generate fibers with diameters ranging from tens of nanometers to a few microns. This workshop will review the basic principle of electrospinning, investigate the effect of several key parameters on fiber generation, demonstrate the method to generate nanofiber mesh and nanofiber conduits, and discuss the potential applications for tissue engineering and repair.

Instructors: Russell Martin and Hai-Quan Mao (Mao Lab)

2. Particle tracking microrheology: This hands-on course will teach participants the fundamentals and applications of high-throughput approaches to cytometry, including cell morphometry and microrheology. These approaches are being used for rapid phenotyping of cancer cells.

Instructors: Wei-Chiang Chen, Pei-Hsun Wu, and Denis Wirtz (Wirtz Lab)

Session B: 3:30-5:30 pm

3. Synthesis of quantum dots for bioengineering: This workshop will provide a hands-on approach to the synthesis of CdSe QD cores and how to purify these cores from excess surfactant. A brief discussion how to successfully electrically passivate the cores will follow. Participants will be able to water solubilize core/shell QDs using pegylated lipids. Several methods for characterizing the QDs through the synthesis and water solubilization will be performed.

Instructors: Charli Dvoracek, Justin Galloway, and Jeaho Park (Searson Lab)

4. Microfluidics for studying cell adhesion: This workshop will focus on fabrication of an “artificial blood vessel” via photolithography to generate a micron-sized (cross-section) channel. The micro-channel will be connected to a syringe pump to initiate fluid flow simulating the blood flow inside a blood vessel. This tool can be used to study how cancer cells interact with “blood vessel” surface when coated with adhesion proteins.

Instructors: Tommy Tong and Eric Balzer (K. Konstantopoulos Lab)

Story by Mary Spiro

 

Environmental applications of nanotechnology discussed March 15

Colloids in porous media (Keller Lab/UCSB)

The Johns Hopkins University Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering hosts the M. Gordon Wolman Seminar Series, Tues., March 15 at 3 p.m. in Ames 234 with Arturo Keller of University of California, Santa Barbara. Keller will present the talk “Environmental Applications of Nanotechnolgy.

Abstract

Currently, nanotechnology is being used to monitor environmental pollutants as well as to remediate various environmental problems. Nanotechnology will help to develop new environmentally safe and green technologies that can minimize the formation of undesirable by-products or effluents. Nanotechnology is already being utilized to improve water quality and to assist in environmental clean-up issues. Environmental sensors to monitor pollutants are also becoming available. The seminar will explore these and other environmental applications of nanotechnology.

Bio
Arturo Keller is Professor at the Bren School of Environmental Science and Management at UC Santa Barbara, and the Associate Director of the UC Center for the Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology. He has a background is in Chemical Engineering, followed by a PhD in Environmental Engineering from Stanford University. He worked in industry for 11 years between his undergrad and graduate degree.

M. Gordon Wolman Seminar Series

 

Mini symposium highlights Johns Hopkins student work in cancer nanotechnology

Maureen Wanjara and Laura Dickinson, Johns Hopkins INBT predoctoral students from Sharon Gerecht’s lab (Photo: Marty Katz)

Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology will host a half-day mini-symposium on Wednesday, March 23 to showcase current research from students affiliated with its Engineering in Oncology Center and Center of Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence. Talks begin at 9 a.m. in Hackerman Hall Auditorium (Room B17) and will conclude by noon.

Students speaking include from the Whiting School of Engineering, predoctoral fellows in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Stephanie Fraley, Laura Dickinson, and Craig Schneider; and postdoctoral fellows Christopher Hale, Jaeho Park, and Eric Balzer. Speaking from Biomedical Engineering will be predoctoral fellow Yi Zhang and undergradute Kelvin Liu; and in Mechanical Engineering postdoctoral fellow Sam Walcott. Also giving presentations are predoctoral fellow Dipankar Pramanik in Pathology at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and John Fini, director of intellectual property for the Homewood campus schools.

Johns Hopkins Engineering in Oncology Center, a Physical Sciences-Oncology Center (PS-OC) funded by a grant from the National Cancer Institute, aims to unravel the physical underpinnings involved in the growth and spread of cancer. Johns Hopkins Center of Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence, also funded by a grant from the NCI, aims to use a multidisciplinary approach to develop nanotechnology-based tools and strategies for comprehensive cancer diagnosis and therapy and to translate those tools to the marketplace.

There is no need to RSVP for the mini-symposium. All Johns Hopkins students, faculty and staff are welcome to attend.

John Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology

Engineering in Oncology Center

Center of Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence

Gerecht wins NSF CAREER Award for work in blood vessel formation

Sharon Gerecht (Photo:Will Kirk/JHU)

Sharon Gerecht, assistant professor in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at Johns Hopkins University, has been awarded the Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Award from the National Science Foundation. The $450,000 prize over five years will help Gerecht in her investigation into how hypoxia, or decreased oxygen, affects the development of blood vessels.

Gerecht’s interdisciplinary research brings together her expertise in stem cell and vascular biology with her background in engineering.  Gerecht said she hopes to discover the mechanisms and pathways involved in the formation of vascular networks, as they relate to embryonic development and diseases such as cancer.

Many medical conditions, such as cancer and heart disease, create areas of decreased oxygen or hypoxia in the spaces between cells. But oxygen is required to maintain normal tissue function by blood vessel networks, which bring nutrients to cells. Likewise, the differentiation of stem cells into more complex organs and structures needs a plentiful supply of oxygen from the vasculature to function.

Gerecht’s study will examine how low oxygen levels impact the growth factors responsible for promoting vascular networks. She also will study the growth of vascular networks in engineered hydrogels that mimic the physical attributes of the extracellular matrix, which is the framework upon which cells divide and grow. Finally, her laboratory will focus on discovering how stem cells differentiate to blood vessel cells and assemble into networks under hypoxic conditions.

She will conduct her research through her role as a project director at the Johns Hopkins Engineering in Oncology Center (EOC), a Physical Science-Oncology Center of the National Cancer Institute. Gerecht is also an associated faculty member of the Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology, which administers the EOC.

Gerecht earned her doctoral degree from Technion – Israel Institute of Technology followed by postdoctoral training at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She joined the faculty of the Whiting School of Engineering at Johns Hopkins in 2007.

The prestigious CAREER award, given to faculty members at the beginning of their academic careers, is one of NSF’s most competitive awards and emphasizes high-quality research and novel education initiatives. It provides funding so that young investigators have the opportunity to focus more intently on furthering their research careers.

Story by Mary Spiro

Former nanobio summer intern featured in med school newsletter

Obafemi Ifelowo (Photo:MSpiro)

One of Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology’s 2010 summer research interns –Obafemi Ifelowo, a senior molecular biology, biochemistry and bioinformatics major at Towson University– was featured in a recent issue of the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine Science Newsletter. Ifelowo worked in the biomedical engineering laboratory of affiliated faculty member Jordan Green. Read more.

INBT’s summer nanobio internship is a Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program funded by the National Science Foundation. The Institute supported 16 students during the summer of 2010 for 10 weeks of research in laboratories across The Johns Hopkins University campuses.  Learn more about INBT’s summer nanobio REU program  here.

INBT’s REU gives students 10 weeks to find out if research is for them

Roberto Rivera worked in Nina Markovic’s physics lab. (Photo: Sarah Gubara)

Johns Hopkins University was founded as a research university. But the fact is, research is not the best career path for everyone. That’s why Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology offers a 10-week summer research internship for undergraduate students. There’s no better way to find out if research is for you than to actually do it.

During the summer of 2010, 16 students from universities across the country were admitted into INBT’s highly competitive Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) funded by the National Science Foundation. This was the third year of INBT’s REU program, and this group of scholars represented the Institute’s largest since the program began. Students are mentored by faculty members, graduate students and postdoctoral fellows in INBT affiliated laboratories across Hopkins.

Makeeda Moore conducted research in Sharon Gerecht’s lab. (Photo: Sarah Gubara)

Projects are designed in such a way that students are able to gather relevant data in such a short period of time. At the end of the 10-week research program, they presented their findings at a university-wide collaborative research poster session held with other summer interns from across several divisions at Johns Hopkins. Some students are invited stay on for a few weeks after the conclusion of their program and continue to work in their assigned laboratories. Several REU scholars have been able to subsequently publish peer-reviewed scientific reports with their advisors.

In addition to their academic and research activities, INBT REU participants have the opportunity to live with other summer interns and mingle at organized and impromptu social events. Outings have included cookouts, crab feasts and Orioles baseball games.

Watch a video about the REU poster session here!

Meet the 2010 REU students here.

Applications are no longer accepted for the 2011 REU program.

Festival draws half a million fans of science and engineering

Charli Dvoracek shows off some nanoparticles at the USA Science & Engineering Festival. (Photo: Mary Spiro)

The scene was a sea of white tents spread across the National Mall in Washington, DC and science and engineering were the order of the day. That’s what greeted visitors to the booth hosted by Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology at the first USA Science & Engineering Festival Expo, held October 23-24.

An estimated 500,000 people attended the two-day event, which featured 550 participating organizations and 1,500 hands-on activities. Those who stopped by INBT’s “Nano-Magic” booth learned about how atoms, molecules and materials have ways of building structures all by themselves.

Twelve graduate students affiliated with INBT training programs and a handful of friends of the Institute volunteered to help visitors understand the science. In addition, several of the research and news videos created by INBT’s Animation Studio were on display throughout the day.

An estimated 500 to 600 people came to the INBT booth and spent from 5 to 20 minutes discussing nanotechnology, Johns Hopkins research, and INBT’s training programs. This first-ever event was a major outreach opportunity for INBT and one of the first times the Institute has had a public display of this kind.

Tania Chan working with youngsters at the USASEF. (Photo: Mary Spiro)“Outreach serves an important purpose,” said Denis Wirtz, INBT’s associate director and professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering who came out Saturday to assist with the demonstration. “It showcases the interdisciplinary nature of INBT’s work to a broad audience. But it also gives the students an opportunity to explain their research in an accessible way. These outreach activities are a requirement of their training program grants, but this skill will also help them in their future careers when explaining their work to funding sources.”

USA Science and Engineering Festival organizers have not announced whether or not they will host another event like this one next year. INBT leaders indicate, however, that they will be interested in participating in this or similar events in the future.

Six exhibitors from Johns Hopkins presented at the USA Science and Engineering Festival. Along with INBT, they included representatives from the Institute for Data Intensive Engineering and Science and the department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering from the Whiting School of Engineering and the undergraduate program in neuroscience, the department of Physics and Astronomy, and the Institute for Biophysical Research from the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences.

USA Science and Engineering Festival Website

Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology

Hopkins Biomaterials Day Symposium Oct. 29

Click here to view flyer.

Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology is a sponsor of the annual Biomaterials Day Symposium to be held Friday, Oct. 29 , from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. in Charles Commons at the Homewood campus.

The goal of this of regional mini-symposium is to show-case all biomaterials related research happening at Johns Hopkins University, University of Maryland, and Pennsylvania State University, to stimulate further collaborations among peers, and to promote student participation in biomaterials research at all levels. Several keynote speakers will be giving talks on various aspects of biomaterials science, engineering and applications.

Join INBT, JHU and our neighboring research universities for this day-long event. You and your lab are invited to share your work on biomaterials at this symposium. Previously presented research may be presented here again. The registration is free and lunch is included.

Society for Biomaterials