Hopkins biomedical engineering doctoral student wins Weintraub Award

Deok-Ho Kim

Deok-Ho Kim, currently a postdoctoral fellow in the department of Biomedical Engineering, was among 13 graduate students from North America chosen to receive the 2010 Harold M. Weintraub Graduate Student Award, sponsored by the Basic Sciences Division of Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, Wash. Nominations were solicited internationally and winners were selected on the basis of the quality, originality and significance of their work.

The award, established in 2000, honors the late Harold M. Weintraub, Ph.D., a founding member of the FHC’s Basic Sciences Division, who in 1995 died from brain cancer at age 49. According to a press release from FHC, “Weintraub was an international leader in the field of molecular biology; among his many contributions, he identified genes responsible for instructing cells to differentiate, or develop, into specific tissues such as muscle and bone.”

Kim will receive a certificate, travel expenses and an honorarium from the Weintraub and Groudine Fund, established to foster intellectual exchange through the promotion of programs for graduate students, fellows and visiting scholars. Kim works in the laboratory of Andre Levchenko, associate professor of biomedical engineering at Johns Hopkins University’s Whiting School of Engineering and an affiliated faculty member of the Institute for NanoBioTechnology.

Read more about Kim’s research with Levchenko here.

APL scientist to explain self-assembled artificial cilia from cobalt nanoparticles

Jason Benkoski

Jason Benkoski

Can nanoparticles be used to engineer structures that could be as flexible and useful as the cilia that help bacteria move around?

Jason Benkoski, a senior scientist at Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory and an affiliated faculty member of Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology, will discuss his current research in this endeavor on March 1  at 1:30 p.m. in the Rome Room, Clark 110 at the Johns Hopkins University Homewood campus. Hosted by the Department of Biomedical Engineering, this talk also will be teleconferenced to the Talbot Library in Traylor 709 at the School of Medicine.

Abstract: Taking inspiration from eukaryotic cilia, we report a method for growing dense arrays of magnetically actuated microscopic filaments. Fabricated from the bottom-up assembly of polymer-coated cobalt nanoparticles, each segmented filament measures approximately 5–15 microns in length and 23.5 nanometers in diameter, which was commensurate with the width of a single nanoparticle. Boasting the flexibility of biological cilia, we envision applications for this technology that include micropumps, micro-flow sensors, microphones with hardware-based voice detection, surfaces with enhanced thermal transfer, switchable, tunable filters, and microscopic locomotion.

Additional Links:

Jason Benkoski’s INBT profile

Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab