Remsen Lecture focuses on nanoelectronics for brain science

Charles M. Lieber of Harvard University will present the 71st Remsen Lecture, Thursday, May 12 at 6 p.m. in 101 Remsen Hall. He will deliver the talk “Nanoelectronic Tools for Brain Science”  and will receive the Remsen Award from the Maryland section of the American Chemical Society. The event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served at 5:30 in Room 140 and a reception will follow the lecture, also in Room 140.

Charles M. Lieber from Asianscientist.com

Charles M. Lieber from Asianscientist.com

Charles M. Lieber received his undergraduate degree in chemistry from Franklin and Marshall College and carried out his doctoral studies at Stanford University, followed by postdoctoral research at the California Institute of Technology. In 1987 he assumed an Assistant Professor position at Columbia University, embarking on a new research program addressing the synthesis and properties of low-dimensional materials. He moved to Harvard University in 1991 and now holds a joint appointment in the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, as the Mark Hyman Professor of Chemistry, and the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.

He serves as the Chair of the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology. At Harvard, Lieber has pioneered the synthesis of a broad range of nanoscale materials, the characterization of the unique physical properties of these materials and the development of methods of hierarchical assembly of nanoscale wires, together with the demonstration of applications of these materials in nanoelectronics, nanophotonics, and nanocomputing, as well as pioneering the field of nano-bioelectronics where he has made seminal contributions to biological and chemical sensing, the development of novel nanoelectronic cell probes, and cyborg tissues.

Lieber’s work has been recognized by a number of awards, including the first ever Nano Research Award, Tsinghua University Press/Springer (2013); IEEE Nanotechnology Pioneer Award (2013); Willard Gibbs Medal (2013); Wolf Prize in Chemistry (2012); ACS Inorganic Nanoscience Award (2009); NBIC Research Excellence Award, University of Pennsylvania (2007); Nanotech Briefs Nano 50 Award (2005); ACS Award in the Chemistry of Materials (2004); World Technology Award in Materials (2004 and 2003); Scientific American 50 Award in Nanotechnology and Molecular Electronics (2003); APS McGroddy Prize for New Materials (2003); MRS Medal (2002); Feynman Prize in Nanotechnology (2001); NSF Creativity Award (1996); and ACS Award in Pure Chemistry (1992).

Lieber is an elected member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the National Academy of Inventors, and Fellow of the American Chemical Society, Materials Research Society, and American Physical Society. He is Co-Editor of Nano Letters and serves on the Editorial and Advisory Boards of a large number of science and technology journals. Lieber also serves on the Technical Advisory Committee of Samsung Electronics. He has published over 380 papers and is the principal inventor on 40 patents. In his spare time, Lieber has been active in commercializing nanotechnology, and founded the nanotechnology company Nanosys, Inc. in 2001 and the nanosensor company Vista Therapeutics in 2007, and nucleated Nantero, Inc. from his laboratory in 2001.

Hopkins to host colloid, surface science symposium

The Johns Hopkins University is hosting the 86th American Chemical Society’s Colloid and Surface Science Symposium in Baltimore, MD on June 10-13, 2012. The meeting includes 13 parallel sessions, a poster session, 28 invited speakers, and 28 session organizers. A new addition to this meeting is the Langmuir Student Awards presentation session with application details given on the conference website.

Abstract submission is now open and the deadline is February 7, 2012. Up-to-date information on the meeting can be found at the website: www.colloids2012.org.

For further details about this meeting please contact the symposium co-organizers Mike Bevan (mabevan@jhu.edu) and Joelle Frechette (jfrechette@jhu.edu). Bevan and Frechette are affiliated faculty members of Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology and members of the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering.

Download the symposium flyer here.

 

Beyond academia and industry

Penelope Lewis, acquisitions editor at the American Chemical Society, spoke at the summer’s second Professional Development Seminar hosted by The Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology (INBT) on June 30 at 11 a.m. in Maryland Hall 110.

Penelope Lewis, acquisitions editor at the American Chemical Society (Photo: Mary Spiro)

Lewis discussed her experience as a scientist making the transition to non-profit, scholarly publishing.

As a PhD candidate, she felt she had only two options: academia or industry. She cautioned against having “too much of a single-minded focus,” as students can get “wrapped up in studying or getting stuck in the lab.” Lewis stressed the importance of having a broad outlook and being involved in a variety of activities to know where one’s true skills and interests lie.

Penelope Lewis advocated for an interactive and investigative approach to understanding career development: “My main piece of advice is to keep your eyes and ears open when considering different careers.” Academic publishing allowed Lewis to combine her interest in writing (she minored in English) with her love of science.

“Being able to communicate your research findings and their significance is such a critical skill. It is necessary not only for securing grants and publishing papers, but also as part of a responsibility that scientists and engineers have to act as good ambassadors for science, and to transfer their excitement and understanding to the public. This is especially important in newer fields like nanotechnology,” she said.

Penelope Lewis has a BS in Chemistry (English Minor) from Indiana University, a Chemistry PhD from Pennsylvania State University, and was a Postdoctoral Research Scientist at Columbia University.

For more information about INBT’s professional development seminars, click here.

Story by Sarah Gubara, Senior, Psychology, Krieger School of Arts and Sciences

ACS Nano editor leads June 30 INBT seminar

Penelope Lewis, acquisitions editor for the journal ACS Nano will lead the next professional development seminar for Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology (INBT) on June 30 at 11 a.m. in Maryland 110. These seminars aim to expand students’ knowledge of issues and ideas relevant to but outside of the laboratory and classroom experience.

Penelope Lewis

Lewis, acquisitions editor of the American Chemical Society’s journal, ACS Nano. Lewis, earned a Ph.D. in chemistry from Penn State University. She will talk about her experience as a scientist moving into the world of academic publishing.

“A career in scholarly publishing can be an interesting and rewarding path for graduate students or post-docs who are looking to move away from the lab bench but still be surrounded by scientific research. In scientific publishing, a doctoral degree or a postdoc is always a great strength and for many positions a requirement. In this talk, I will describe the daily activities involved in working at a non-profit publisher, including the skills and interests that are helpful to succeed in this position,” Lewis said.

All JHU/JHMI and APL faculty, staff and students are invited to attend these free seminars, designed to promote discussion and interaction with scientific and engineering professionals. To find out the location and to RSVP for each seminar, please contact Ashanti Edwards at ashanti@jhu.edu.

Professional development seminars kick off with talks on tech transfer, publishing

Aris Melissaratos

UPDATED TIMES AND LOCATIONS

Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology (INBT) will host four free professional development seminars for scientists and engineers this summer. These seminars aim to expand students’ knowledge of issues and ideas relevant to but outside of the laboratory and classroom experience.

Topics include intellectual property, commercialization and entrepreneurship, science journalism and publishing, ‘life after college” and much more. This summer, talks will be held Wednesdays at 11 a.m. on June 16, June 30, July 14 and July 28. Talks on June 16 and June 30 will be held in Maryland 110; talks on July 14 and July 28 will move to Ames 234.

Talks scheduled so far include:

June 16: Aris Melissaratos, senior advisor to the president from Johns Hopkins University Technology Transfer, will discuss what it takes for an research idea to move from bench to the commercial market. Johns Hopkins Technology Transfer is the office that links university researchers and businesses interested in commercializing their inventions.

June 30:  Penelope Lewis, acquisitions editor of the American Chemical Society’s journal, ACS Nano. Lewis, who earned a PhD in Chemistry from Penn State University, will talk about her experience as a scientist moving into the world of academic publishing.

Penelope Lewis

“A career in scholarly publishing can be an interesting and rewarding path for graduate students or postdocs who are looking to move away from the lab bench but still be surrounded by scientific research. In scientific publishing, a doctoral degree or a postdoc is always a great strength and for many positions a requirement. In this talk, I will describe the daily activities involved in working at a non-profit publisher, including the skills and interests that are helpful to succeed in this position,” Lewis said.

All JHU/JHMI and APL faculty, staff and students are invited to attend these free seminars designed to promote discussion and interaction with scientific and engineering professionals. To find out the location and to RSVP for each seminar, please contact Ashanti Edwards at ashanti@jhu.edu.