Affiliates receive state stem cell research awards

Several researchers associated with Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology have received grants from the Maryland Stem Cell fund.

In the Whiting School of Engineering, awardees include Sharon Gerecht, Kent Gordon Croft Investment Management Faculty Scholar in the Whiting School of Engineering’s Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering and associate director of the Institute for NanoBioTechnology, and Warren Grayson, associate professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering. Both received MSCRF Investigator Initiated Grants. Gerecht’s stem cell project targets diabetic wound treatment, and Grayson’s targets volumetric muscle loss.

2000px-Stem_cell_treatments.svgIn addition, Dhruv Vig, a post-doctoral student in INBT and the Department of Mechanical Engineering, received one of the organization’s Post-Doctoral Fellowship Grants for his project “Geometric Cues in the Establishment and Maintenance of Heterogeneous Stem Cell Colonies.”

According to Vig, the goal of this investigation is to introduce a new way of characterizing the potency and/or differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells.

“Our work uses an innovative blend of mathematical modeling and experimental approaches to shed light on the role of physical forces and geometric constraint involved in the establishment and maintenance of proper stem cell functions,” explains Vig, who is advised by Gerecht and Sean Sun, professor and vice-chair in the Department of Mechanical Engineering.

Other INBT affiliated faculty members who received the grants include Guo-li Ming, M.D., Ph.D., targeting schizophrenia and autism and Michael McMahon, Ph.D., targeting intervertebral disc degeneration, both from the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.

Of the 26 MSCRP grants, 21 went to Hopkins-affiliated researchers. The purpose of these grants and fellowships is to promote state-funded stem cell research.

 

 

 

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