Chakravarthy: edging toward breakthroughs in nanomedicine

Krishnan Chakravarthy is a resident physician in the Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. He is also the founder of a company called NanoAxis. He is seeking potential faculty collaborators through Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology, where he is a recently affiliated faculty member.

Krishnan Chakravarthy

Krishnan Chakravarthy

Chakravarthy launched NanoAxis in 2009 while earning an MD and PhD at SUNY Buffalo. He won the Henry A. Panasci Jr. Technology Entrepreneurship Competition sponsored by the University of Buffalo School of Management with a business plan for creating a new drug delivery mode for seasonal and pandemic flu using quantum dots and gold nano particles.

He is the remaining founder and owner of NanoAxis and says the company has grown significantly since 2009. NanoAxis now has active labs and collaborators both nationally and internationally. The company is now taking root in Maryland, and Chakravarthy says he is actively working on collaborating with local biotech businesses in the area.

INBT: Can you briefly summarize your company’s main goals?

KC: At inception, we were primarily interested as a business to commercialize quantum dot technology for various industrial applications. Over the course of six years, our business goals have shifted from large-scale nano materials manufacturing to being the world leader in developing paradigm-shifting technologies in the field of nano medicine. For us, this comprises nano particle enabled advances in drug delivery and smart design point-of-care devices using nanotechnology.

At present, we have four main preclinical candidates that we are working on with the eventual goal of beginning FDA clinical trials. One project involves a novel antiviral therapy for seasonal and pandemic influenza that we are actively developing with the US Centers for Disease Control. This antiviral therapy also has shown to have therapeutic benefits in the treatment of Ebola virus.

In the realm of neuroscience, we have efforts to target Alzheimer’s disease, chronic pain, and depression using nano particles that deliver micro RNA and signal interference RNA designed to up-regulate and down-regulate key proteins. The preclinical data from both in vitro and in vivo studies look extremely promising.

Furthermore, we are currently in developing of two hand-held devices for screening for infections related to prosthetic implants (such as joint replacement). They could be used in the operating room and clinics across the US. Our goal is for orthopedic surgeons to be able to measure specific infection markers at their fingertips to enable them to make safe and cost-effective medical management decisions based on an accurate and precise screening tool. One of the devices will be iPhone compatible, while the other we are developing as a stand-alone device that would be ideal for markets in developing countries.

Our hope is that our platform will extend to diagnosing infectious diseases, be used in the Intensive Care Unit for basic metabolic panel measurements and be extended to a host of other medical applications. We will likely begin FDA clinical trials for these devices by early 2016.  I am also working on developing a platform for detection of various disease processes using nanotechnology and breath as a medium for detecting specific breath-based biomarkers.

INBT: What sort of collaborations are you hoping to establish?

KC: I am hoping to use the extensive knowledge at INBT and at Hopkins to help further our development efforts. As an affiliated faculty, I feel honored to be part of such an impressive think tank of scientists and entrepreneurs. I believe nanotechnology is at the heart of the bench-to-bedside paradigm. It is one component of the growing medical revolution that is happening around the world. In addition, unlike any other industry or science, nano medicine advances are going to be interdisciplinary and collaborative. So teamwork, collaboration, and collective ideas are going to push ongoing advances and development.

INBT: What are the main research challenges you would like to address?

KC: At present, the main stumbling block will be pushing our technology through FDA clinical trials. The process is long, tedious, and expensive. In addition, preclinical data has to be sound. So refinement of the nano materials to find the ideal candidate to deliver the gene or drug will require creativity and repeated experimentation. In addition, when thinking about the ultimate goal of seeing these drugs being used in patients, large-scale production becomes an important component to address.  It has to be of consistent quality, safe, and easily reproducible in large quantities.  So these are things we need to think about from an industrial perspective when you are no longer in the academic realm.

INBT: Anything else people should know?

KC: I am looking forward to working with other INBT faculty.  We are always open to new ideas, and my research team would be more than willing to start new projects.  Likewise, we will also try and suggest areas that we think specific faculty would be suitable for project development.

Visit the Chakravarthy Research Group Website: www.nanoaxisllc.com

Recent Publications:

Jacob A, Chakravarthy K (2014-04-06 14:52:34 UTC) Engineering Magnetic Nanoparticles for Thermo-Ablation and Drug Delivery in Neurological Cancers. Cureus 6(4): e170. doi:10.7759/cureus.170

Jacob A, Chakravarthy K, Law M, et al. (2014-04-21 18:33:15 UTC) Neuroradiology, Anesthesia, Bioengineering, and Hardware Programming in the Clinical Applications of Deep Brain Stimulation. Cureus 6(4): e172. doi:10.7759/cureus.172

Upcoming Invited Talks:

Designing smart nano-systems for effective gene and drug delivery across the blood brain barrier.  12th Annual World Brain Mapping and Therapeutics Congress.  March 6-8, 2015, Los Angeles, USA

Selective abrogation of IL-12/IL-23 production provides novel therapeutic modality in combating lethal synergism of influenza and secondary pneumonia.  5th World Congress on Cell Science and Stem cell research.  March 23-25, 2015, Chicago, USA

Periodically Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology (INBT) features a brief profile on one of its affiliated faculty members. If you are an affiliated faculty member of INBT and would like to be featured, contact INBT’s science writer, Mary Spiro at mspiro@jhu.edu. If you wish to become an affiliated faculty member visit this link. http://inbt.jhu.edu/apps/faculty/join/

 

 

 

 

Leave a Comment

*