INBT Grant Proposal Service: Formula for Funding Success

To support their research endeavors, scientists must rely on the grant support they receive from institutions such as the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the National Science Foundation (NSF).

The application process for these grants is a tedious and time consuming process, which in the multidisciplinary field of nanobiotechnology, often involves scientists from different fields of expertise. These collaborations add an extra level of difficulty to the already lengthy process of submitting a successful proposal.

In an effort to maximize the possibilities for nanobiotechnology research at Johns Hopkins University, the Institute for NanoBioTechnology (INBT) not only brings faculty together but offers them help to prepare and submit nanobiotechnology related proposals.

“It’s a great service we offer that fits in with the goal of the Institute,“ says Sue Porterfield, administrative manager at INBT. “Most of these multidisciplinary grants would take the faculty and their department administrators a lot of time to prepare.“

Porterfield is the main force behind the proposal service. She estimates that she spends about 75 percent of her time preparing, submitting, and eventually administering the nanobio grants submitted through INBT.

Apparently, Porterfield has developed an effective system. Since INBT launched in May 2006, 36 percent of the proposals submitted through fiscal year 2007 were successfully awarded.

The numbers also show INBT’s cross divisional dimensions. Thirty-four faculty members acted as primary investigators (PIs) or co-PIs, representing four different divisions within Johns Hopkins University: the School of Medicine, the Bloomberg School of Public Health, the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences, and the Whiting School of Engineering.

If you would like to learn more about the grant proposal service or funding opportunities through INBT, contact Sue Porterfield at sporterfield@jhu.edu.

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