Apply now for Certificate of Advanced Studies in Nanobiotechnology

Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology is recruiting for the fall and spring cohorts for our graduate training program. Doctoral students who successfully complete the program will receive a Certificate of Advanced Studies in Nanobiotechnology. Students already admitted to graduate programs in most science and engineering disciplines are invited to apply.

Read a full description of the program in this certificate flyer. Screen Shot 2014-06-03 at 3.30.11 PM

If accepted, INBT training program students participate in:

  • weekly journal clubs and tutorials
  • additional education through an engineering course and dvanced cell biology course
  • the intersession Nanobio Bootcamp
  • a science communications course

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact Ashanti Edwards directly at Ashanti@jhu.edu or reach out to INBT directors Peter Searson or Denis Wirtz. We look forward to reviewing the files of prospective applicants for the program.

For more information on our graduate programs visit this link.

For media inquires regarding Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology or its programs, centers or faculty experts, contact Mary Spiro, Media Relations Director, at mspiro@jhu.edu or 410-516-4802.

 

Advanced Cell Biology and the engineer

As part of the INBT’s Nano-Bio Graduate Training Program, we are required to take a few courses, on top of our departmental course requirements. To fulfill these requirements, I am currently taking AS.020.686 Advanced Cell Biology.

I expected the course to be just another required course – interesting, but not as exciting as the courses I elect to take. While the 8:30 a.m. time slot is earlier than I would like, the material has been very enjoyable so far.

I have a background in biomedical engineering, but I haven’t actually taken a biology class since high school. As a result, I have an engineer’s perspective on biology, which, as it turns out, is very different than that of a biologist. Even though we are all thinking about the same problems, the things that we emphasize as important are quite different. In Advanced Cell Biology, I have the opportunity to look at biology as a biologist, which has been both refreshing and informative.

My research project is heavily based in biology, but I approach it as an engineer. The course is helping me to see my project in another light. So far, this shift in perspective has proven useful, and I think it will be valuable in my future endeavors, too.

Right now, there are people with many different backgrounds doing biomedical research – biologists, chemists, physicists, mathematicians, engineers, and medical doctors, to name a few – and they present a diverse set of views regarding the best way to approach a given problem. In my experience, they all make important contributions to the larger picture, but no single perspective seems like it will be able to answer the big questions.

I think it will be the combination of these perspectives that will ultimately be able to solve the really big biomedical problems. Taking Advanced Cell Biology this semester is giving me a small taste of how combining two viewpoints – that of an engineer with that of a biologist – can provide new ideas and insights.

Nuala Del Piccolo is a PhD candidate in the department of materials science and engineering. She conducts research on the thermodynamics of receptor tyrosine kinases.