Posters solicited for Regenerative Medicine and Tissue Engineering Symposium

labwarestockPosters are now being accepted for the Regenerative Medicine and Tissue Engineering Symposium, co-organized by the Institute for Cell Engineering and Translational Tissue Engineering Center. The symposiumwill be held  from 8:30 to 5 p.m. October 7, 2014 in the Mountcastle Auditorium, Pre-Clinical Teaching Building. Our keynote speakers are Dr. Irv Weismann from Stanford University and Dr. Arnold Caplan from Case Western Reserve University. Other speakers to be announced.

Students, postdoctoral fellows and faculties are encouraged to attend this one day symposium and present their work related to regenerative medicine during the lunchtime poster session. Please submit a short poster abstract to Eleni Georgantonis at egeorga1@jhmi.edu by September. 15.  Awards for the best posters from students and postdocs will be presented at the end of the day.

The event is co-hosted by INBT affiliated faculty Jennifer Elisseeff and Guo-li Ming.

In celebration of data

The Celebration of Data Symposium features a keynote talk by Denis Wirtz, Vice Provost for Research, Theophilus Halley Smoot Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering and associate director of INBT. Speakers will be discussing how they have been using and leveraging data in their new lives. Topics will vary widely, from academic science, to the biotech industry, to work in the private and government sectors. The symposium will be held Friday, June 20 in Hackerman Hall B-17 (basement auditorium) from 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. on the Homewood campus. This event is free and open to the Hopkins community.

Former PhD Shyam Khatau with Dens Wirtz. Photo by Will Kirk

Former PhD Shyam Khatau (left) with Dens Wirtz. Photo by Will Kirk

Agenda

  • 9:00 – 9:10 am Andrew Douglas Vice Dean for Faculty, WSE, Opening Remarks
  • 9:10 – 9:30 am Soichiro Yamada, PhD Associate Professor, UC Davis, To adhere or not to adhere: self-contact elimination by membrane fusion
  • 9:30 – 9:50 am Osi Esue, PhD, MBA Strategy Manager, Genentech, From single cells to the clinic: the roadmap of drug discovery and development
  • 9:50 – 10:10 am Daniele Gilkes, PhD, Assistant Research Professor, JHU Hypoxia and the ECM: drivers of tumor metastasis
  • 10:10 – 10:30 am Shyam Khatau, PhD, Senior Consultant, Navigant The secret life of a consultant
  • 10:30 – 11:00 am Coffee Break
  • 11:00 – 11:20 am Jerry S.H. Lee, PhD Health Sciences Director, NCI, Advancing Convergence and Innovation in Cancer Research
  • 11:20 – 11:40 am Tom Kole, MD, PhD Radiation Oncology Resident, Georgetown, Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy of Prostate Adenocarcinoma
  • 11:40 – 12 noon Owen McCarty, PhD Associate Professor, OHSU, Cytoskeletal remodeling of blood cells
  • 12 noon – 1 pm Lunch
  • 1:00 – 1:20 pm Steph Fraley, PhD BWF CASI Fellow, JHU, Digital Nucleic Acid Melting Analysis for Rapid Infectious Disease Diagnostics
  • 1:20 – 1:40 pm Brian Daniels, PhD Program Manager, Draper Laboratory, Design, development, and deployment
  • 1:40 – 2:00 pm Michelle Dawson, PhD Assistant Professor, Georgia Tech, Mechanosensitivity and the Rho/ROCK pathway
  • 2:00 – 2:20 pm Eva Lai, PhD Innovation Officer, JHU, Translational medicine in the DoD
  • 2:20 – 2:40 pm Coffee Break
  • 2:40 – 3:00 pm Konstantinos Konstantopoulos, PhD Professor and Chair, Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, JHU, The physical biology of cancer metastasis
  • 3:00 – 3:45 pm Denis Wirtz, PhD VP of Research, TH Smoot Professor of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, Oncology and Pathology, JHU, The measurement science of cell migration
  • 3:45 Owen McCarty, PhD Associate Professor, OHSU, Closing Remarks

 

 

Congratulations to INBT symposium poster prize winners

Five winners took home prizes during the poster session held at the annual symposium hosted by Johns Hopkins Institute for Nanobiotechnology May 2 at the School of Medicine. The theme of the symposium was Stem Cell Science and Engineeering: State of the Art. Fifty-six posters were presented from disciplines across the university and were judged by faculty and industry experts. First, second and third place winners won Nikon cameras and honorable mentions won digital frame key chains.

DSC_0186

From left, Rebecca Schulman, Thomas Joseph, Kirsten Crapnell, Lauren Woodard, Jane Chisholm, Tao Yu, and Robert Ivkov. (Photo by Yi-An Lin)

The winners and poster titles included:

First Place:

Lauren Woodard: Synthesis and characterization of multifunctional core-shell magnetic nanoparticles for cancer theranostics. Lauren E. Woodard, Cindi L. Dennis, Anilchandra Attaluri, Julie A. Borchers, Mohammad Hedayati, Charlene Dawidczyk, Esteban Velarde, Haoming Zhou, Theodore L. DeWeese, John W. Wong, Peter C. Searson, Martin G. Pomper* and Robert Ivkov.

Second Place:

Tao Yu:  Intravaginal Delivery Of Paclitaxel Via Mucus-Penetrating Particles For Local Chemotherapy Against Cervical Cancer. Yu T, Yang M, Wang Y-Y, Lai SK, Zeng Q, Miao B, Tang BC, Simons BW, Ensign L, Liu G, Chan KWY, Juang C-Y, Mert O, Wood J, Fu J, McMahon MT, Wu T-C, Hung C-F, Hanes J.

Third Place:

Jane Chisholm: Mucus-penetrating cisplatin nanoparticles for the local treatment of lung cancer. Jane Chisholm, Jung Soo Suk, Craig Peacock, Justin Hanes.

Honorable mentions went to:

Anilchandra Attalur: Magnetic Nanoparticle Hyperthermia As Radiosensitizer For Locally Advanced Pancreas Cancer. Anilchandra Attaluri, Haoming Zhou, Yi Zhong, Toni-rose Guiriba, Mohammad Hedayati, Theodore L. DeWeese, Eleni Liapi, Christine Iacobuzio-Donahue, Joseph Herman, and Robert Ivkov

Maureen Wanjare:  The Differentiation and Maturation of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Derived from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells using Biomolecular and Biomechanical Approaches. Maureen Wanjare, Frederick Kuo, Gyul Jung, Nayan Agarwal, Sharon Gerecht

Poster Judges included Robert Ivkov, PhD, assistant professor in radiaton oncology/ radiobiology and Seulki Lee, PhD, assistant professor in neuroradialogy, both from the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine; Rebecca Schulman, PhD, assistant professor in chemical and biomolecular engineering at the Whiting School of Engineering; and Kirsten Crapnell, PhD, and Thomas Joseph, PhD, both of BD Diagnostics.

Check out a gallery of some photos from the poster session shot by PhD candidate Yi-An Lin who works in the laboratory of Honggang Cui in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering.

 

 

 

 

Stem Cell Science, Engineering theme of May 2 symposium

Johns Hopkins Institute for Nanobiotechnology is now accepting posters for its annual symposium to be held May 2 at Owens Auditorium (located between CRB I and CRB II) at the School of Medicine. Deadline for poster registration is April 30. Top presenters are eligible to win one of three NIKON cameras.

All disciplines and topics are encouraged to register, even if not related to theme.

Go to this link for full agenda and to register.

nano-bio-symposium-14-flyer (2)The theme this year is Stem Cell Science and Engineering: State-of-the-Art. Speakers start at 9 a.m. through noon. Then at 1:30 there will be a poster session where students across Johns Hopkins will present some of their current research findings. Judges have been selected from industry and the university. Don’t miss this exciting exploration of how scientists, engineers and clinicians can work together with stem cells to solve some of humanities pressing problems in health and medicine.

This year’s speakers and talk titles include:

• 8:30-9 am Registration Lobby of Owens Auditorium

• 9:00-9:05 Welcome and Introduction of speakers Peter Searson

• 9:05-9:35 Human cell engineering: recent progress in reprogramming cell fates and editing the nuclear genome, Linzhao Cheng

• 9:35-10:05 Regenerating Musculoskeletal Tissues from Fat, Warren Grayson

• 10:05-10:35 Hitting the Bull’s Eye: Targeting HMGA1 in Cancer Stem Cells using Nanotechnology, Linda M. S. Resar

• 10:35-10:45 Coffee Break

• 10:45-11:15 Engineering biomaterials to enhance stem cell potential, Hai-Quan Mao

• 11:15 -11:45 Engineered Human Pluripotent Stem Cells for Disease Modeling Applications, Mark Powers

• 11:45-12:15 Understanding the function of risk genes for mental disorders using iPSC models, Guo-li Ming

Lunch break

• 1:30-3:30 pm Poster Sessions Owens Corridor

• 3:30 Announcement of Poster Session Winners/Adjourn

 

 

 

Are cellular technologies scalable?

Are cellular technologies scalable? According to Phillip Vanek, Head of Innovation at Lonza Bioscience, the answer to this question is “yes”, but only if scaling is considered very early in the technology’s development. Vanek addressed the topic of scalability at his talk at the INBT symposium.

scalabilityScaling-up of bench-top science into industrial processes is difficult for a number of reasons. Commercial-scale production of cell-based products introduces regulatory challenges and production volumes never encountered on the bench scale. Even the basic laboratory chore of cell passage can become a large hurdle when attempting to grow large number of cells in the multi-layered cell factory system.

With such challenges in mind, Vanek lays out a number of ways to improve the success rate of scaling up processes. He stressed that a process should ideally be closed for maximum success. A closed process prevents product contamination and minimizes user error. Also, maximizing automation helps minimize operator error in processing.

Most importantly, the treatable patient pool sizes and dosage requirements need to be well-known for a process to be commercially successful. Vanek concluded that cellular technologies are scalable, but only if researchers start with end goals in mind early and are well-aware of potential pitfalls.

Lonza 

Editor’s Note: This a summary of one of the talks from the 2013 Nano-bio Symposium hosted by Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology held May 17. This summary was written by Christian Pick, a doctoral candidate in the chemical and biomolecular engineering laboratory of Joelle Frechette. Look for other symposium summaries on the INBT blog.

 

Mesenchymal stem cell-based therapies offer hope

Editor’s Note: The following is a summary of one of the talks from the 2013 Nano-bio Symposium hosted by Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology held May 17. This summary was written by Randall Meyer, a doctoral candidate in the biomedical engineering and a member of the Cancer Nanotechnology Training Center. Look for other symposium summaries on the INBT blog.

Among many of the therapies developed over the past several years, stem cells remain one of the most promising for purposes of regeneration, autoimmune disease, and cancer treatment.

Gabriele Todd of Osiris Therapeutics.

Gabriele Todd of Osiris Therapeutics.

Gabrielle Todd, a senior scientist at Osiris Therapeutics, explained some the new mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) based therapies that the company has been developing over the past several years during her talk at the annual Nano-Bio Symposium, hosted by Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology.

The key features that make MSCs such an attractive option is their ability to be isolated from a patient, expanded ex vivo, and re-infused into the same or possibly a different patient. Once inside the body they will home to the site of trouble and release anti-inflammatory and regenerative signals to the damaged tissue. In addition, these cells are what is known as “immune privileged,” in that they lack the necessary signals to trigger an immune response, customary in other transfusions.

Todd summarized some applications on which the company is currently working. One is an MSC-based therapy that utilizes the unique properties of these cells to treat a wide variety of immune related diseases such as graft vs. host disease, Crohn’s disease, and tissue damage from cardiac arrest to juvenile diabetes.

A second application is a product that utilizes MSCs immobilized in a membrane and applied to the site of an external wound. This cells then mediate regeneration of the external tissues, allowing for more efficient healing.

Todd reports that some of these therapies could be available on the market in the coming years.

Osiris Therapeutics, Inc. 

Overcoming drug delivery barriers

Editor’s Note: The following is a summary of one of the talks from the 2013 Nano-bio Symposium hosted by Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology held May 17. This summary was written by Randall Meyer, a doctoral candidate in the biomedical engineering and a member of the Cancer Nanotechnology Training Center. Look for other symposium summaries on the INBT blog.

Nanotechnology bears a multitude of possibilities to systematically and specifically treat many well-characterized and currently untreatable diseases.  Despite this, there exist multiple barriers to its development including challenges related to delivery in the human body.

justin_hanes

Justin Hanes, a professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at Johns Hopkins University, highlighted some of the exciting advances that his laboratory has developed to overcoming these challenges.  According to Hanes, one of the primary functions of nanobiotechnology is to enable a therapy to be delivered to a specific location and only remain there for as long as it is needed.  He likened this idea to applying weed poison to a rose garden.  You only want to apply a little bit of poison to a targeted area, not flood the whole garden.  Unfortunately conventional cancer chemotherapy is like flooding the garden, but only 1 percent of the drug reaches the tumor.  Hanes stated the goal of his work is to flip that so that all but 1 percent of the drug makes it to the site of delivery.

With that in mind, Hanes summarized two stories from his lab of ideas that are successfully being translated from bench to bedside.  One therapy involves the use of custom designed nanoparticles that are capable of penetrating the mucus layers of various human tissues to enable a controlled release of drug into the body.  The second therapy involves the use of injectable particles to the eye that inhibit blood vessel formation,  which is related to diseases such as macular degeneration.

These therapies are being developed by biotech companies launched by Hanes, GrayBug and Kala Pharmaceuticals.

Tumor cells change when put into a ‘tight spot’

Konstantinos Konstantopoulos addresses audience at 2012 NanoBio Symposium. Photo by Mary Spiro/JHU

“Cell migration represents a key aspect of cancer metastasis,” said Konstantinos Konstantopoulos, professor and chair of the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at Johns Hopkins University. Konstantopoulos was among the invited faculty speakers for the 2012 NanoBio Symposium.

Cancer metastasis, the migration of cancer cells from a primary tumor to other parts of the body, represents an important topic among professors affiliated with Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology. Surprisingly, 90 percent of cancer deaths are caused from this spread, not from the primary tumor alone. Konstantopoulos and his lab group are working to understand the metastatic process better so that effective preventions and treatments can be established. His students have studied metastatic breast cancer cells in the lab by tracking their migration patterns. The group has fabricated a microfluidic-based cell migration chamber that contains channels of varying widths. Cells are seeded at one opening of the channels, and fetal bovine serum is used as a chemoattractant at the other opening of the channels to induce the cells to move across. These channels can be as big as 50 µm wide, where cells can spread out to the fullest extent, or as small as 3 µm wide, where cells have to narrowly squeeze themselves to fit through.

A current dogma in the field of cell migration is that actin polymerization and actomyosin contractility give cells the flexibility they need to protrude and contract across a matrix in order to migrate. When Konstantopoulos’s students observed cells in the wide, 50 µm-wide channels, they saw actin distributed over the entirety of the cells, as expected. They also observed that when the cells were treated with drugs that inhibited actin polymerization and actomyosin contractility, they did not migrate across the channels, also as expected.

However, when the students observed cells in the narrow, 3 µm-wide channels, they were surprised to see actin only at the leading and trailing edges of the cells. Additionally, the inhibition of actin polymerization and actomyosin contractility did not affect the cells’ ability to migrate.

“Actin polymerization and actomyosin contractility are critical for 2D cell migration but dispensable for migration through narrow channels,” concluded Konstantopoulos. The data challenged what many had previously believed about cell migration by showing that cells in confined spaces did not need these actin components to migrate.

These findings are indeed important in the context of cancer metastasis, where cells must migrate through a heterogeneous environment of both wide and narrow areas. Konstantopoulos’s data gives a better mechanistic understanding of the different methods cancer cells use to migrate in diverse surroundings.

Future studies in the Konstantopoulos lab will focus on how tumor cells decide which migratory paths to take. INBT-sponsored graduate student Colin Paul has developed an additional microfluidic device that contains channels with bifurcations. He hopes to determine what factors guide a cell in one direction versus another. The Konstantopoulos lab hopes to continue to understand exactly how tumor cells migrate so that new therapies can eventually be developed to stop metastasis.

Story by Allison Chambliss, a Ph.D. student in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering with interests in cellular biophysics and epigenetics.

Watch a video related to this research here.

Konstantopoulos reported these findings in October 2012 The Journal of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology.  Read the article online here.

 

Four students honored at INBT research symposium

Spyros Stamatelos with INBT director Peter Searson. Photo by Mary Spiro

Four students were honored for their research efforts at Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology’s sixth annual symposium. A poster session with more than 75 research posters from every division of the university was held in the afternoon and four posters were selected for top honors.

A poster by Yu-Ja Huang, Justin Samorajski, Rachel Kreimer, Denis Wirtz and Peter Searson won first prize, and first author Huang was awarded the $200 gift card from Best Buy. Their poster was entitleThe Influence of Electric Field and Confinement on U-87 Glioblastoma Cells.

Jack Andraka describing his research at the INBT poster session. Photo by Mary Spiro

Taking second place was Anirudha Sing, Jianan Zhan and Jennifer Elisseeff with the poster Directed Stem Cell Differentiation Using PEG-alpha CD-derived biomaterials. First author Singh claimed the $100 Best Buy card.

A $50 Best Buy card was presented to Spyros Stamatelos who was first author with Eugene Kim, Arvind Pathak and Aleksander Popel on the poster Characterization of the Heterogeneity of Tumor Vasculature using Hemodynamic Modeling and High Resolution Imaging Implications for Drug Delivery.

Honorable mention was given to Jack Andraka, a high school research intern in the lab of Anirban Maitra who worked with Venugopal Chenna. Andraka’s poster, A Novel Paper Sensor for the Detection of Pancreatic Cancer, helped him win a free book from Springer.

The event was held  at the Johns Hopkins medical campus in the Owens Auditorium on May 4 with six faculty expert speakers and approximately 400 people in attendance.

Students talk cancer nanotech at Homewood March 21

Students affiliated with the Center of Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence (CCNE) and the Physical Sciences-Oncology Center (PS-OC) at Johns Hopkins University have organized a spring mini-symposium for March 21, 10 a.m. in the Hackerman Hall Auditorium at the Johns Hopkins University Homewood campus.

The student-run mini-symposiums aim to bring together researchers from across the campus affiliated with the PS-OC and CCNE. Graduate students training in these centers, both administered by Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology, work in various disciplines from physics to engineering to the basic biological sciences but with an emphasis on understanding cancer metastasis and developing methods for cancer diagnosis or therapy.

The invited speaker for the symposium is postdoctoral researcher Megan Ho of Duke University. Ho earned her PhD in mechanical engineering in the Wang lab in 2008. She is currently focused on developing microfluidic devices to investigate and control the fundamental reactions that form nanocomplexes for gene delivery. (10 a.m.)

Student apeakers, who will talk for 15 minutes, include:

  • Jane Chisholm (Justin Hanes lab/Ophthalmology): Cisplatin nanocomplexes for the local treatment of small cell lung cancer (10:20 a.m.)
  • Yunke Song (Jeff Wang Lab/Mechanical Engineering): Single Quantum Dot-Based Multiplexed Point Mutation Detection by Gap Ligase Chain Reaction (10:35 a.m.)
  • Andrew Wong (Peter Searson Lab/Materials Science and Engineering): Intravisation into an artificial blood vessel (10:50 a.m.)
  • Brian Keeley: (Jeff Wang Lab/Mechanical Engineering): Overcoming detection limitations of DNA methylation in plasma and serum of cancer patients through utilization of nanotechnology. (11:05 a.m.)
  • Sebastian Barretto (Sharon Gerecht Lab/Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering): Development of Hydrogel Microfibers to Study Angiogenesis (11:20 a.m.)

View the symposium flyer here. The mini-symposium is free and open to the entire Johns Hopkins University community. No RSVP is required, although seating is limited.

Johns Hopkins Physical Sciences-Oncology Center

Center of Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence