Blog posts from Belgium

colin-leuven

Catholic University of Leuven (Photo by Colin Paul)

During the summer, a select group of researchers from Johns Hopkins travel to Leuven, Belgium to work at the micro- and nano- electronics fabrication laboratories of IMEC. Usually three to five students are able to go over for up to three months to work on a research project that is collaboratively arranged by both IMEC researchers and Johns Hopkins University faculty.

The students usually are advancing some aspect of a project they have started here at JHU. In a few instances, researchers from IMEC come to JHU to work. Faculty at both locations work together to develop projects that are mutually beneficial to all parties.

Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology provides financial support for our research through the National Science Foundation’s International Research Experience for Students (IRES) program. The arrangement with IMEC has been in place since 2009.

IMEC, which used to be referred to as the Interuniversity Microelectronics Centre, is an unusual research entity that grew out of an agreement between the Flemish government and the academic community at Catholic University of Leuven They now have more than 2,000 researchers from all around the globe working at their high tech facility.

To keep in touch with our researchers while they are away and to find out about their outside of laboratory adventures, INBT established the IMEC blog.  Click here to check out what our students have done, this summer and over the last several years.

 

2013 summer nano-bio research interns get to work

Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology welcomes its summer 2013 research interns. Students arrived from universities from across the nation to conduct 10 weeks of research in INBT sponsored laboratories. Interns are supported by the National Science Foundation Research Experience for Undergraduates  program through INBT and receive housing and a stipend during their tenure at Hopkins. At the end of their research project, students will present posters describing their work with other Hopkins students in a university-wide poster session.

This year’s students include:

Shantel Angstadt is from Elizabethtown College. She is working in the cell biology laboratory of Doug Robinson at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.

Hamsa Gowda is from UMBC. She is working in the materials science and engineering laboratory of Peter Searson at the Whiting School of Engineering.

Toni-Rose Guiriba is currently studying at Baltimore County Community College. She is working in the radiation oncology laboratory of Robert Ivkov at the School of Medicine.

Sarah Hansen is from the University of Virginia and is working with Jordan Green in his biomedical engineering laboratory at the School of Medicine.

Devante Horne studies at Clemson University and is conducting research with Honggang Cui in his chemical and biomolecular engineering laboratory at the Whiting School of Engineering.

Cameron Nemeth is from the University of Washington and is working in the materials science and engineering laboratory of Hai-Quan Mao at the Whiting School of Engineering.

Victoria Patino studies at Carnegie Mellon University and also works in the materials science and engineering laboratory of Hai-Quan Mao.

Camilo Ruiz studies at MIT and works with Deniz Wirtz in his chemical and biomolecular engineering laboratory at the Whiting School of Engineering.

Marc Thompson studies at North Carolina A & T State University and is conducting research in the biomedical engineering laboratory of Warren Grayson at the School of Medicine.

Breanna Turner is from Fort Valley State University and works in the materials science and engineering laboratory of Margarita Herrera-Alonso at the Whiting School of Engineering.

Jordan “Jo” Villa is from The College of William and Mary and conducts research in the chemistry laboratory of J.D. Tovar in the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences.