Neuro X symposium talk titles revealed

We know you are probably wondering what this Neuro X symposium is all about. It’s a pretty mysterious title for a research symposium. But we at the Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology like to keep you on your toes. Neuro is well, brain stuff, and X is, well, nearly anything you want it to be. And our talk titles reflect as much!

The Neuro X symposium (and poster session) is Friday, May 1 from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the Owens Auditorium, between CRB I and CRB II  on the Johns Hopkins University medical campus. If you have not registered yet, please go to http://inbt.jhu.edu/news/symposium/ and register a poster or just let us know you are going to be there.

From 8 to 9 a.m. there will be a free continental breakfast and time for networking. After a brief introduction from symposium chairs Peter Searson, director of the Institute for NanoBioTechnology, and Dwight Bergles, professor in the Solomon H. Snyder Department of Neuroscience, the speakers will begin as follows:

9:05 – 9:35 – Alfredo Quiñones-Hinojosa, MD, FAANS, “Cutting Edge: Chasing Migratory Cancer Cells”

Professor of Neurological Surgery and Oncology
Neuroscience and Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine

9:35 – 10:05 – Jordan J. Green, PhD, “NanoBioTechnologies to Treat Brain Cancer”

Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Ophthalmology, Neurosurgery,
Johns Hopkins School of Medicine; Materials Science & Engineering, Whiting School of Engineering

10:05 – 10:35 – Ahmet Hoke MD, PhD, FRCPC, “Electrospun nanofibers for nerve regeneration”

Professor, Neurology and Neuroscience, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine

10:35-10:45 – Break/Networking

10:45-11:15 – Patricia H. Janak, “Neural circuits for reward: new advances and future challenges”

Professor, Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences/Department of Neuroscience, Krieger School of Arts and Sciences Johns Hopkins University

11:15- 11:45 – Piotr Walczak, MD.PhD, “MRI-Guided Targeting of the Brain with Therapeutic Agents at High Efficiency and Specificity”

Associate Professor, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Division of MR Research, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

11:15 – 12:15 – Martin G. Pomper, MD, PhD, “Molecular Neuroimaging”

William R. Brody Professor of Radiology; Professor of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine

12:15 -1:15 – Lunch

1:15-2:15 – Poster Session A

2:15-3:15 – Poster Sessions B

3:30 – Prize Presentations/Photos

Adjourn

 

Join the Facebook event page here: https://www.facebook.com/events/640947002669229

For all press inquiries regarding INBT, its faculty and programs, contact Mary Spiro, mspiro@jhu.edu or 410-516-4802.

 

Mesenchymal stem cell-based therapies offer hope

Editor’s Note: The following is a summary of one of the talks from the 2013 Nano-bio Symposium hosted by Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology held May 17. This summary was written by Randall Meyer, a doctoral candidate in the biomedical engineering and a member of the Cancer Nanotechnology Training Center. Look for other symposium summaries on the INBT blog.

Among many of the therapies developed over the past several years, stem cells remain one of the most promising for purposes of regeneration, autoimmune disease, and cancer treatment.

Gabriele Todd of Osiris Therapeutics.

Gabriele Todd of Osiris Therapeutics.

Gabrielle Todd, a senior scientist at Osiris Therapeutics, explained some the new mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) based therapies that the company has been developing over the past several years during her talk at the annual Nano-Bio Symposium, hosted by Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology.

The key features that make MSCs such an attractive option is their ability to be isolated from a patient, expanded ex vivo, and re-infused into the same or possibly a different patient. Once inside the body they will home to the site of trouble and release anti-inflammatory and regenerative signals to the damaged tissue. In addition, these cells are what is known as “immune privileged,” in that they lack the necessary signals to trigger an immune response, customary in other transfusions.

Todd summarized some applications on which the company is currently working. One is an MSC-based therapy that utilizes the unique properties of these cells to treat a wide variety of immune related diseases such as graft vs. host disease, Crohn’s disease, and tissue damage from cardiac arrest to juvenile diabetes.

A second application is a product that utilizes MSCs immobilized in a membrane and applied to the site of an external wound. This cells then mediate regeneration of the external tissues, allowing for more efficient healing.

Todd reports that some of these therapies could be available on the market in the coming years.

Osiris Therapeutics, Inc.