It’s a small world: Micro/nanotechnology in regenerative medicine and cancer

Sageeta Bhatia

Nanotechnology, regenerative medicine and cancer will be the topic of a special biomedical engineering seminar on March 6 at 3 p.m. in the Darner Conference Room, Ross Building, Room G007 at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. Speaker Sangeeta Bhatia, MD, PhD, director, of the Laboratory for Multiscale Regenerative Technologies at Massachusetts Institute of Technology will present “It’s a small world: Micro/Nanotechnology in Regenerative Medicine and Cancer. ” She will discuss the role of micro and nanotechnology for mimicking, monitoring and perturbing the tissue microenvironment.

“I will present our work on reconstructing normal liver microenvironments using microtechnology, biomaterials and induced pluripotent stem cells as well as our work on normalizing diseased cancer microenvironments using both inorganic and organic nano materials,” Bhatia noted in an announcement.  Bhatia is a professor of Health Sciences and Technology and professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT.

The talk is hosted by associate professor of Materials Science and Engineering and affiliated faculty member of the Institute for NanoBioTechnology Hai-Quan Mao. The event is free and open to the Johns Hopkins Community. Refreshments will be served.

 

 

Hopkins faculty to present at American Society for NanoMedicine meeting

© Liudmila Gridina | Dreamstime.com

The American Society for NanoMedicine (ASNM) will hold its third annual meeting November 9 -11 at the Universities at Shady Grove Conference Center in Gaithersburg, Md. This year ASNM has worked closely with the Cancer Imaging Program, National Cancer Institute, and National Institutes of Health to create a conference with a special focus on nano-enabeled cancer diagnostics and therapies, and the synergy of the combination of nano-improved imaging modalities and targeted delivery.

The program also focuses on updates on the newest Food and Drug Administration, nanotoxicity, nanoparticle characterization, nanoinformatics, nano-ontology, results of the latest translational research and clinical trials in nanomedicine, and funding initiatives. This year’s keynote speaker is Roger Tsien, 2008 Nobel Prize Laureate. Numerous other speakers and breakout sessions are planned for the three day event. Two speakers affiliated with Johns Hopkins include Justin Hanes and Dmitri Artemov. Hanes is a professor of nanomedicine in the department of ophthalmology at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. Artemov is an associate professor of radiology/magnetic resonance imaging research, also at the School of Medicine.

The deadline for the poster abstracts is October 1. The top four posters submitted by young (pre and post doctoral) investigators will be selected to give a short 10-minute (eight slides) oral presentation on November 11.

ASNM describes itself as a “a non-profit, open, democratic and transparent professional society…focus(ing) on cutting-edge research in nanomedicine and moving towards realizing the potential of nanomedicine for diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of disease.” More information about the ASNM can be found on the Society’s official website.

 

 

Nanobio postdocs offer trusted tips on getting grant money

Photo illustration by Mary Spiro.

Three postdoctoral fellows from Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology will offer a one-hour crash course in how to get those research dollars; July 27, 11 a.m. Krieger 205. Free for Hopkins community.

Funding dollars make the research world go ‘round. Few know that better than postdoctoral fellows, who would be out of work without it. As part of Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology’s last professional development seminar of the summer, three INBT affiliated postdoctoral fellows will offer their sage advice on preparing winning research grants.

Topics to be covered on the basic aspects of grant writing include:

  • knowing when to write a grant
  • identifying funding sources
  • planning a timeline
  • how to structure a competitive proposal
  • do’s and dont’s of grant writing and planning
  • basic science writing tips for conveying ideas clearly and succinctly

This seminar will be led by Eric Balzer, postdoctoral fellow with professor Konstantinos Konstantopoulos (ChemBE); Yanique Rattigan, postdoctoral fellow with professor Anirban Maitra (Oncology/Pathology); and Daniele Gilkes, postdoctoral fellow with professor Denis Wirtz (ChemBE).

For additional information on INBT’s professional development seminar series, contact Ashanti Edwards, INBT’s Academic Program Administrator at Ashanti@jhu.edu.

 

 

 

 

Becton Dickinson leader to discuss medical device development

Adam Steel (Becton Dickinson)

INBT hosts a talk on medical device development from Becton Dickinson systems integration director Adam Steel, July 13, 11 a.m. in Krieger 205. Free to Hopkins community.

Adam Steel, PhD, Director of Systems Engineering at Becton Dickinson, will discuss medical device development as part of Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology’s professional development seminars, Wednesday July 13 at 11 a.m. in Krieger 205.

Dr. Steel joined BD in 2005. Previously he was vice president of research and development at MetriGenix. He earned his PhD in analytical chemistry at the University of Maryland College Park and undergraduate degrees in chemistry and mathematics from Gettysburg College. He completed a postdoctoral fellowship in medical device development at the National Institutes of Standards and Technology.

This talk is the third installment in INBT’s free, summer professional development seminar series. Topics are geared toward undergraduate and graduate students.

The final seminar will be held July 27 on the topic of the grant submission process and how to obtain funding for research. For additional information on INBT’s professional development seminar series, contact Ashanti Edwards, INBT’s Academic Program Administrator at Ashanti@jhu.edu.

 

 

Come to the NanoBio Film Festival 11 a.m., 6/29 in Krieger 205

Charli Dvoracek storyboarding a video. Photo by Mary Spiro

Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology (INBT) hosts the NanoBio Film Festival on June 29, 11 a.m. in Krieger 205. See the world premiere of three short videos made by members of INBT’s course on science communications. Free for Hopkins community.

Videos featured in this film festival describe the current research of students working in INBT affiliated laboratories. Students in the course learn how to communicate their work in nontechnical terms for general audiences. They work in teams to write, direct, film and produce the videos within a two-week time frame. The producers will be on hand to describe their experience making the videos and to answer questions.

The INBT film festival is part of the institute’s free professional development seminar series. Topics are geared toward undergraduate and graduate students.

Future seminars include:

  • July 13: Adam Steel, PhD, Director of Systems Engineering at Becton Dickinson, will discuss medical device development. Dr. Steel joined BD in 2005. Previously he was vice president of research and development at MetriGenix. He earned his PhD in analytical chemistry at the University of Maryland College Park and undergraduate degrees in chemistry and mathematics from Gettysburg College. He completed a postdoctoral fellowship in medical device development at the National Institutes of Standards and Technology.
  • July 27: Grant submission process and how to obtain funding; a roundtable discussion with INBT affiliated postdoctoral students.

For additional information on INBT’s professional development seminar series, contact Ashanti Edwards, INBT’s Academic Program Administrator at Ashanti@jhu.edu.

 

 

NanoBio professional development seminars begin June 15

Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology (INBT) kicks off this summer’s free professional development seminars for scientists and engineers on Wednesday, June 15 with a talk about how to launch your career after graduation. All seminars are held in Krieger 205 at 11 a.m. and are open to all members of the Hopkins community, though topics are geared toward undergraduate and graduate students.

Tom Fekete, INBT’s director of corporate partnerships will speak at the first seminar on Wednesday. Fekete works to build partnerships between INBT faculty researchers and industry leaders. He also coordinates student education and training opportunities through corporate partnerships.

Fekete has worked at Johns Hopkins University since 2009 and comes with more than three decades of experience in the chemical and pharmaceutical industries, primarily in a senior management role. He last worked for KV Pharmaceuticals of St. Louis, Missouri, as Director of Operations Projects. Prior to that, he directed manufacturing sites for Astaris LLC of St. Louis and held executive level positions in research, engineering and manufacturing for the chemicals operations for FMC Corporation in Baltimore and Philadelphia. The holder of four U.S. patents, Fekete, earned his Master’s in Chemical Engineering from Johns Hopkins University and his Bachelor’s in Chemical Engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

INBT’s professional development seminars are designed to expand students’ knowledge of issues and ideas relevant to but outside of the laboratory and classroom experience. Additional professional development seminars this season include:

  • June 29: INBT’s Student-made Film Festival; come watch the premiere of the latest group of films produced by INBT-affiliated students on their current research. Films are made as part of INBT’s course, Science Communication for Scientists and Engineers: Video News Releases.
  • July 13: Adam Steel, PhD, Director of Systems Engineering at Becton Dickinson, will discuss medical device development. Dr. Steel joined BD in 2005. Previously he was vice president of research and development at MetriGenix. He earned his PhD in analytical chemistry at the University of Maryland College Park and undergraduate degrees in chemistry and mathematics from Gettysburg College. He completed a postdoctoral fellowship in medical device development at the National Institutes of Standards and Technology.
  • July 27: Grant submission process and how to obtain funding; a roundtable discussion with INBT affiliated postdoctoral students.

For additional information on INBT’s professional development seminar series, contact Ashanti Edwards, INBT’s Academic Program Administrator at Ashanti@jhu.edu.

 

 

 

 

 

MedImmune scientist focuses final INBT seminar on ‘soft skills’

 

Ambarish Shah of MedImmune

Ambarish Shah, Senior Manager and Principal Scientist at MedImmune Inc., presented the final Professional Development Seminar talk hosted by the Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology (INBT) on July 28. Shah’s presentation included an overview of the Biopharmaceutical industry and offered an insider’s perspective on how MedImmune manages the process of protein drug development.

Shah stated that “success in your careers will not only depend on how well you master the scientific principles in theory but more so how you apply them innovatively,” impressing upon students the value of applying science to solving practical problems. In addition, he stressed the acquisition of “soft skills” along with science, such as people skills and networking. Shah stressed the importance of protecting one’s intellectual property, as well as the safety and efficacy of a product. Despite the risks and costs, he urged students to always remember the altruistic purpose behind their work, cautioning: “don’t get attached to projects, get attached to science.”

Due to the fact that new research in the field is presented at technical conferences or published in peer reviewed journals, scientists tend to speak in technical terms that are too complex for the general public to understand. Shah stated that the field is missing “the clarity in linking what we do scientifically in our labs to the tangible benefits the general public end user will see, and a good forum to share it in.”

Shah offered students insight in understanding career development, stating that career success comes from a combination of many good personal attributes such as clarity of communication, willingness to a make a persistent effort, teamwork, and of course an analytical problem solving mind (all of these which can be learned through deliberate practice). Most importantly he advised students that “Grades and publications matter, but just to get the first job. After the first job, the only thing that matters is demonstrated results.”

Shah received his PhD in Pharmaceutical Sciences from Mercer University in 1998, a Master of Science from Duquesne University, and a Bachelor of Pharmacy from Bombay University in India. He has been in the field for over twelve years and is currently the Principal Scientist/Group leader for MedImmune’s Dept. of Formulation Sciences in Gaithersburg, Md.

Story by Sarah Gubara, Senior, Psychology, Krieger School of Arts and Sciences

Professional development seminars kick off with talks on tech transfer, publishing

Aris Melissaratos

UPDATED TIMES AND LOCATIONS

Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology (INBT) will host four free professional development seminars for scientists and engineers this summer. These seminars aim to expand students’ knowledge of issues and ideas relevant to but outside of the laboratory and classroom experience.

Topics include intellectual property, commercialization and entrepreneurship, science journalism and publishing, ‘life after college” and much more. This summer, talks will be held Wednesdays at 11 a.m. on June 16, June 30, July 14 and July 28. Talks on June 16 and June 30 will be held in Maryland 110; talks on July 14 and July 28 will move to Ames 234.

Talks scheduled so far include:

June 16: Aris Melissaratos, senior advisor to the president from Johns Hopkins University Technology Transfer, will discuss what it takes for an research idea to move from bench to the commercial market. Johns Hopkins Technology Transfer is the office that links university researchers and businesses interested in commercializing their inventions.

June 30:  Penelope Lewis, acquisitions editor of the American Chemical Society’s journal, ACS Nano. Lewis, who earned a PhD in Chemistry from Penn State University, will talk about her experience as a scientist moving into the world of academic publishing.

Penelope Lewis

“A career in scholarly publishing can be an interesting and rewarding path for graduate students or postdocs who are looking to move away from the lab bench but still be surrounded by scientific research. In scientific publishing, a doctoral degree or a postdoc is always a great strength and for many positions a requirement. In this talk, I will describe the daily activities involved in working at a non-profit publisher, including the skills and interests that are helpful to succeed in this position,” Lewis said.

All JHU/JHMI and APL faculty, staff and students are invited to attend these free seminars designed to promote discussion and interaction with scientific and engineering professionals. To find out the location and to RSVP for each seminar, please contact Ashanti Edwards at ashanti@jhu.edu.

Life after graduate school: Or lessons learned after 15 years in industry

Matthew Lesho

Matthew Lesho

Update – this talk has been rescheduled to Tuesday July 28 at 11 a.m. in 110 Maryland Hall.

Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology presents Matthew J. Lesho, PhD, Biomedical Engineer with Northrop Grumman Electronic Systems for the final Professional Development Seminar for this summer. His talk, “Life after graduate school: Or lessons learned after 15 years in industry,” will be held July 22 Tuesday July 28 at 11 a.m. in 110 Maryland Hall Room B17 CSEB. This seminar is free and open to students, faculty, and staff.

Ever wonder what it might be like to work in industry for a small medical device start-up company or a large defense contractor? Learn from an expert with nearly 15 years in industry. Lesho will lead an interactive discussion that will highlight the similarities and differences of working in industry as compared to a career in academia. Lesho also will ask the audience to share their perceptions about what they think life will be like after graduation. This seminar provides some real world examples of product and technology development in the industrial environment to help students studying science and engineering gain some perspective on how their academic degrees could be applied to current medical, the military, or homeland defense challenges.

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