Nanobio film festival projects posted to YouTube

Each summer, I teach a course through Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology for our training grant students in science communication. The course, Science Communication for Scientists and Engineers: Video News Release (EN.670.609), teaches students methods for communicating their research to a nontechnical audience. Topics covered include conveying your research in 60 seconds, scripting, story boarding and video camera filming and techniques.

inbt-abstractMartin Rietveld, INBT’s web and animation director, and the staff at the Digital Media Center on the Homewood campus, also play an integral part in this short summer workshop. The class meets four times for lecture and discussion, where they are shown many science videos and discuss case studies on what works in communicating technical information to a lay audience. They visit the DMC and INBT’s animation studio. The student groups then have approximately five weeks to work independently on their projects. At the end of the course, students show their completed videos at the INBT film festival.

This year the film festival was held on July 23 with nearly 50 people in attendance. We had 12 filmmakers split into three groups of four students.  The topics and teams and resulting videos follow. Enjoy!

Cancer

Ivie Aifuwa, chemical and biomolecular engineering, Denis Wirtz Lab

Moriah Knight, materials science, Peter Searson Lab

Christopher Saeui, biomedical engineering, Kevin Yarema Lab

Zinnia Xu, biomedical engineering, Peter Searson Lab

Lab-on-a-Chip Technology

Prasenjit Bose, physics, Daniel Reich Lab

Sarah Friedrich, biomedical engineering, Jeff Wang Lab

Erin Gallagher, materials science and engineering, Peter Searson Lab

Yu Shi, physics, Daniel Reich Lab

In Vitro Models for Testing Drug Delivery

Max Bogorad, materials science and engineering, Peter Searson Lab

Alex Komin. materials science and engineering, Peter Searson Lab

Luisa Russell, materials science and engineering, Peter Searson Lab

Bin Sheng Wong, chemical and biomolecular engineering, Konstantinos Konstantopoulos Lab

For all press inquiries regarding INBT, its faculty and programs, contact Mary Spiro, mspiro@jhu.edu or 410-516-4802.

 

 

 

Six years on my fantastic nano-bio voyage, and counting

Back in 2003, several jobs before I came to work at Johns Hopkins University, a coworker asked me if I had ever heard of nanotechnology. I had heard the term, certainly, but I wasn’t sure what it was or what it could do. We came to the conclusion that nanotech was probably something like the technology presented in that 1960s science fiction movie “Fantastic Voyage”, in which a team of medical doctors where shrunken, placed in a capsule and injected into a man’s bloodstream in an attempt to treat him, except you know, not LITERALLY like that. Then I forgot all about nano. I never imagined it would have a major impact on my life, let alone anyone else’s.

Then, in 2007 I was hired to be the science writer for the Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology (INBT), and I had to get up to speed on all this nano-bio stuff in a hurry. I learned that nano is at the scale of just a few atoms and that a nanometer is as small as 1/100,000th the width of the human hair. Through discussions with the 200 plus researchers affiliated with INBT, I can honestly say that I never imagined that nanotech could be or would be used in some of the ways that it has been. Most references on nanotechnology mention its use in electronics such as cell phones or in materials for sports gear. You can even find nano in cosmetics and stain repellant clothing.

Here at Hopkins, researchers are going far beyond materials and electronics uses. Nanotechnology is being developed for drug delivery, to trigger the immune system to fight disease, as scaffolds for tissue engineering, and to study cancer at the single cell level, among many other things. Each month, faculty members affiliated with INBT publish leading-edge research on nano-related science in peer-reviewed journals. All the possible avenues for its use can be overwhelming. There are also some INBT researchers investigating the potential risks from nanobiotechnology alongside the numerous benefits.

To tell you about these findings, we have established a blog, newsletters and the Nano-Bio Magazine. We have engaging and educational animations from the INBT animation studio, directed by Martin Rietveld. And each summer I teach a course for our science and engineering graduate students that trains them to create videos about their work, which we later show at the INBT Film Fest. Every week, we are developing new ways to get the word out on what INBT is doing and how its work can improve our lives.

Ten years ago, I never imagined nanotechnology would have a major impact on my life, let alone anyone else’s. But nanotechnology and nanoBIOtechnology are going to be around for a while, although most people won’t think about it unless and until they have some reason to confront it. The potential of nanobiotechnology for solving problems in medicine and healthcare has yet to be fully realized. I would like to think that in my lifetime we would see the direct and tangible benefits of nanotechnology in medicine at the patient care level. I think that is already starting to happen. I am glad to be part of this “fantastic voyage” of discovery at Johns Hopkins. I hope that what we do here to communicate these discoveries to you helps make you feel like you are part of that journey, too.

Mary Spiro is the science writer and blog maven for Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology.

Check out our videos and animations on INBT’s YouTube Channel.

Read Nano-Bio Magazine.

Go on a Fantastic Voyage!