REU student profile: Rebecca Majewski

DNA, the genetic sequence that tells cells what proteins to manufacture, typically resides inside the nucleus of a cell, but not always. Rebecca Majewski is studying the uptake of DNA into cell nuclei using a different polymer chains. Rebecca is a rising senior in BioMolecular Engineering from the Milwaukee School of Engineering and is working as a summer intern in the Johns Hopkins Institute for Nanobiotechnology’s REU program.

“We are interested in how much of the DNA with the polyplex can get into the nucleus,” she said, but explains that DNA associated outside of the nucleus can cause false higher measurements.

Rebecca Majewski. Photo by Mary Spiro

Rebecca Majewski. Photo by Mary Spiro

Rebecca is washing the cells with the nuclei to get rid of DNA outside the nucleus and then comparing the measurement of uptake of the DNA by the cell versus the measurement of the uptake of DNA by the nucleus.

“We are interested in what DNA gets inserted into the nucleus because that is what is ultimately expressed. It is important to find out how much makes it to the final destination and then is expressed. The goal of this work is to test different polymer chains to see which one actually does the better job of getting the DNA into the nucleus,” she said.

Rebecca works alongside PhD students and postdoctoral fellows in the biomedical engineering lab of Jordan Green lab at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. She says she highly values the opportunity for a research experience through INBT’s REU because her undergraduate institution does not train graduate students.

For all press inquiries regarding INBT, its faculty and programs, contact Mary Spiro, mspiro@jhu.edu or 410-516-4802.

REU student profile: Ian Reucroft

Sitting at what looks like a pottery wheeled turned on its side, Ian Reucroft is using a method called electrospinning to create a nano-scale polymer fiber embedded with a drug that encourages nerve growth. The strand is barely visible to the eye, but the resulting fibers resemble spider web.

Ian Reucroft, a rising junior in Biomedical Engineering at Rutgers University, is working in the medical school campus laboratory of Hai-Quan Mao, professor of materials sciences and engineering at Johns Hopkins University. He is part of Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology’s summer REU, or research experience for undergraduates program.

Ian Reucroft in the Mao lab. Photo by Mary Spiro.

Ian Reucroft in the Mao lab. Photo by Mary Spiro.

“We are developing a material to help regrow nerves, either in central or peripheral nervous systems,” said Ian. One method of doing that he explained is to make nanofibers and incorporating a drug into those fibers, drugs that promote neuronic growth or cell survival or various other beneficial qualities. The Mao lab is looking into a relatively new and not well-studied drug called Sunitinib that promotes neuronal survival.

“We make a solution of the component to make the fiber, which is this case is polylactic acid (PLA), and the drug, which I have to dissolve into the solution,” Ian said. Although the drug seems to remain stable in solution, one of the challenges Ian has faced has been improving the distribution of the drug along the fiber.

This is Ian’s first experience with electrospinning but not his first time conducting research. He plans to pursue a PhD in biomedical engineering and remain in academia.

For all press inquiries regarding INBT, its faculty and programs, contact Mary Spiro, mspiro@jhu.edu or 410-516-4802.

REU student profile: Sierra Atwater

Sierra Atwater just completed her freshman year as a biology major at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill. She works in the chemical and biomolecular engineering laboratory of professor Denis Wirtz at Johns Hopkins University and is part of the Institute for NanoBioTechnology REU program. REU stands for Research Experience for Undergraduates and is a National Science Foundation funded program administered by INBT.

Sierra explained that the Wirtz group is “looking at cell motility and proliferation to see how different cancer cells move and what affects that movement.”

Sierra Atwater

Sierra Atwater

“I’ve been looking at cell division and cell density over a 16-hour period,” she added said. “I have learned how to do a lot in this lab such as how to make 3D collagen gel matrices and how to make 2D gels, how to use T2000 microscopes and the confocal microscopes and how to do ELISAs.” Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays or tests use antibodies to detect substances.

Hasini Jayatilaka, PhD student in ChemBE, mentors Sierra. In addition, Sierra says she feels she can call upon the expertise of other students working in the Wirtz lab. This is her first research experience, and she says, the hardest thing so for has been just remembering how to do so many different techniques.

For more information about INBT’s summer REU program, visit this link.

For all press inquiries regarding INBT, its faculty and programs, contact Mary Spiro, mspiro@jhu.edu or 410-516-4802.

 

 

 

One REU’s experience at the Council on Undergraduate Research Conference

Over this past summer, I participated in the Research Experience for Undergraduates Program at Johns Hopkins University Institute for NanoBioTechnology (INBT). I was placed in Douglas Robinson’s laboratory under the mentorship of Vasudha Srivastava in the School of Medicine. I worked on the preliminary studies necessary to determine the molecular mechanisms of regulation within the cell’s mechanosensory system.

It was one of the best experiences of my life; I thoroughly enjoyed every day of it. Dr. Robinson and his lab members were extremely welcoming, supportive, and resourceful throughout the entire ten weeks and even after the program ended. I was able to gain substantial research experience and develop relationships with the people in the lab. At the end of the program, I was fortunate enough to be chosen to present the work I had done at the 2013 Council on Undergraduate Research Conference of Research Experiences for Undergraduates Student Scholarship (CUR CREUSS) in Arlington, VA.

Shantel Angstadt, a 2013 REU, during the INBT poster session. Photo by Mary Spiro.

The CUR CREUSS was another great experience. I was able to meet students who participated in REU programs at institutions from all across the country as well as the faculty members involved in the REU programs. Each student participated in three, 30-minute poster sessions, and we were asked questions about our work and overall experience during the summer.

We were also able to attend a faculty poster session during which each faculty member presented the work he or she is currently involved in. I loved having the opportunity to talk about my experience and to learn of others’ experiences doing research. There was a very diverse group of studies among the students and faculty in a variety of fields, such as: chemistry, engineering, life sciences, mathematical sciences, geosciences, psychology, social sciences, and materials research. The conference also provided “Breakout Sessions” in which National Science Foundation (NSF) members presented on the importance of research, good conduct, graduate school, careers, research funding, and a variety of other topics. These sessions were very informative and useful. I attended the “Applying for Graduate School Support from NSF” and “Incorporating Your Research Experiences into Applications for Post-Baccalaureate Fellowships and Nationally Competitive Awards” sessions. Overall, this experience allowed me to further develop my presentation skills, gain exposure to other fields of study, network, and learn of all the resources provided by the NSF.

One last piece of information from the CUR CREUSS that I feel the need to share with other undergraduate students is of the NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program. It provides three years of financial support to graduate students and, if awarded, makes the student more competitive when applying to graduate programs. It is a great opportunity that I was not aware of until attending the conference.

My experiences from the INBT REU program and CREUSS have lead me to believe that it should be mandatory for students interested in research careers to participate in extracurricular research programs. I gained information and experience that are essential in choosing a career and developing as a scientist and as a person. I believe the most important aspects of each were the exposure to different fields of study and the information on the different resources and opportunities available to undergraduates. I will always be grateful for these opportunities provided by the INBT faculty and staff and Dr. Robinson’s lab.

Shantel Angstadt is in her senior year at Elizabethtown College studying biochemistry and was an REU intern at Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology for the summer of 2013.

 

2013 summer nano-bio research interns get to work

Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology welcomes its summer 2013 research interns. Students arrived from universities from across the nation to conduct 10 weeks of research in INBT sponsored laboratories. Interns are supported by the National Science Foundation Research Experience for Undergraduates  program through INBT and receive housing and a stipend during their tenure at Hopkins. At the end of their research project, students will present posters describing their work with other Hopkins students in a university-wide poster session.

This year’s students include:

Shantel Angstadt is from Elizabethtown College. She is working in the cell biology laboratory of Doug Robinson at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.

Hamsa Gowda is from UMBC. She is working in the materials science and engineering laboratory of Peter Searson at the Whiting School of Engineering.

Toni-Rose Guiriba is currently studying at Baltimore County Community College. She is working in the radiation oncology laboratory of Robert Ivkov at the School of Medicine.

Sarah Hansen is from the University of Virginia and is working with Jordan Green in his biomedical engineering laboratory at the School of Medicine.

Devante Horne studies at Clemson University and is conducting research with Honggang Cui in his chemical and biomolecular engineering laboratory at the Whiting School of Engineering.

Cameron Nemeth is from the University of Washington and is working in the materials science and engineering laboratory of Hai-Quan Mao at the Whiting School of Engineering.

Victoria Patino studies at Carnegie Mellon University and also works in the materials science and engineering laboratory of Hai-Quan Mao.

Camilo Ruiz studies at MIT and works with Deniz Wirtz in his chemical and biomolecular engineering laboratory at the Whiting School of Engineering.

Marc Thompson studies at North Carolina A & T State University and is conducting research in the biomedical engineering laboratory of Warren Grayson at the School of Medicine.

Breanna Turner is from Fort Valley State University and works in the materials science and engineering laboratory of Margarita Herrera-Alonso at the Whiting School of Engineering.

Jordan “Jo” Villa is from The College of William and Mary and conducts research in the chemistry laboratory of J.D. Tovar in the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences.


 

 

 

 

Meet INBT’s summer interns, already digging into their research

Research does not take a holiday during the summer at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Md. In fact, it ramps up with the addition of many new faces from across the country.

The Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology summer research interns have arrived and are already busy at work in various laboratories. This year’s group is the largest the institute has ever hosted, with 17 undergraduates from universities nationwide.

Of the total, three students are affiliated with the Center of Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence and four are affiliated with the Physical Sciences-Oncology Center. The remaining 10 are part of the National Science Foundation Research Experience for Undergraduates program. All are hosted through INBT, which serves as a hub for their academic and social activities.

INBT summer interns conduct 10 weeks of research in a laboratory either on the Homewood or the medical campus of the University. At the end of that time, students have learned how to work in a multidisciplinary team and how to manage a short term research project.  They also discover if research is a pathway they want to pursue after earning their bachelor’s degrees.

In August, interns from many of the science, medicine, engineering and public health summer programs will gather for a  poster session to be held on August 2 at 3 p.m. in Turner Concourse. The poster session will allow students to show off the results of their their work.

This year’s INBT/PS-OC/CCNE interns include:

At the Whiting School of Engineering…

Amani Alkayyali from Wayne State University is an REU student in the laboratory of Honggang Cui assistant professor in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering. Also in the Cui lab are CCNE intern Matthew Fong from the University of California, Berkeley and Michelle LaComb, an REU student from Rice University.

Sharon Gerecht, assistant professor in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular engineering, is hosting three interns. Josh Porterfield of Cornell University and Carolyn Zhang from the University of California, San Diego are both PS-OC interns, and Bria Macklin of Howard University is an REU intern.

Jacqueline Carozza of Cornell University is a PS-OC student working in the lab of Denis Wirtz, professor in the Department Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering. Cassandra Loren from Oregon State University is a PS-OC intern also working in the Wirtz lab.

Eric Do from the University of Washington is an REU working in the lab of assistant professor Margarita Herrara-Alonso in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering.

Olivia Hentz from Cornell is an REU student working in the lab of Jonah Erlebacher, professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering.

Justin Samorajski from the University of Dallas is a returning summer intern, once again working in the materials science and engineering lab of professor Peter Searson as part of the CCNE.

At the School of Medicine…

Lauren Lee of Cornell University is an REU working in the lab of biomedical engineering lab of associate professor Hai-Quan Mao.

Albert Lu from the University of California Berkeley is a CCNE intern working in the biomedical engineering lab of associate professor Jeff Wang.

Bianca Lascano from Norfolk State University is an REU in assistant professor Jordan Green’s biomedical engineering lab.

Charlie Nusbaum of the Richard Stockton College is an REU intern in the radiation oncology lab of assistant professor Robert Ivkov.

At the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences…

Anthony Loder of Rowan University is an REU working in the biology lab of assistant professor Xin Chen.

Daniel McClelland is also REU from Bethany College works in the chemistry laboratory of professor Howard Fairbrother.

 

 

Summer interns join PS-OC labs

Each summer, Johns Hopkins Institute for Nanobiotechnology (INBT) hosts several summer research interns, five of who will conduct research as part of Johns Hopkins Physical Sciences-Oncology Center.

Erin Heim, from University of Florida, will be testing the effects of cell geometry and chemotaxis on cell polarity in the Denis Wirtz lab (Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering). “The goal is to find which of the two is more important to polarity when working against each other,” she said.

Also in the Wirtz lab, Nick Trenton is developing an agarose-based microfluidics chamber that can be used to establish a chemotaxis gradient in 3D cell culture. “We’ll be testing various cell knockdowns in 3D in the presence of a chemokine gradient,” he said.

Rachel Louie from Johns Hopkins, works in the Peter Searson lab (Materials Science and Engineering). She is characterizing the properties of human umbilical vein endothelial cells cultured under different conditions. “We’re testing to see how the amount of growth factors in cell culture medium will affect transendothelial electrical resistance values,” Louie said.

Thea Roper from North Carolina State University works in the Sharon Gerecht lab (Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering). Roper said she will analyze how human embryonic stem cells mature into smooth muscle cells. “To do this, I must determine the pathway by using techniques such as immunofluorescence, RT-PCR, and Western Blot to examine Myocardin, a transcriptional co-activator, Elk-1, a ternary complex factor, PDGF-R, platelet-derived growth factor receptors, and SRF, serum response factors,” she said.

Quinton Smith also works in the Gerecht lab. This is his second year interning at Hopkins. Smith, from University of New Mexico, is fabricating a microfluidic device that recreates hypoxic (low oxygen) conditions. “I’ll study how adult and embryonic stem cells respond to this dynamic environment,” he said.

Read more about INBT’s summer interns at the following link: http://wp.me/p1sSPo-VT

 

Nanobio interns begin work in Hopkins labs

This week, 14 students from universities across the country began 10 weeks of laboratory work as part of the Johns Hopkins Institute for Nanobiotechnology (INBT) Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program. The National Science Foundation (NSF) funded REU is supported and administered by INBT.

This is the fourth year INBT has hosted REU students, which pairs undergraduates with faculty, graduate students and postdoctoral fellows in laboratories across the Hopkins campuses. At the end of their research experience, students present their findings at a university-wide collaborative research poster session held with other summer interns from across several divisions. They also have a better understanding of what it takes to  be a full-time academic researcher.

Although all students are working in INBT affiliated laboratories, five students involved in the REU this summer will be specifically conducting research as part of Johns Hopkins Physical Sciences-Oncology Center (PS-OC). The PS-OC, also known as Johns Hopkins Enginering in Oncology Center, emphasizes the use of the physical sciences in the study of the spread and development of cancer. Three students will work in labs associated with the Center of Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence (CCNE)

Another goal of the NSF-based program is to encourage students from under represented groups, such as women and minorities, to follow career paths that include academic science or engineering research. INBT’s nanobio REU has been particularly popular, attracting several hundred applications to its highly competitive program each year.

Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology 2011 REUs include:

Mary Bedard, Elon University (J.D. Tovar Lab, Chemistry)

Lyndsey Brightful, Hampton University (Margarita Herrera-Alonso Lab, Materials Science and Engineering)

Erin Heim, University of Florida (Denis Wirtz Lab/PSOC, Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering)

Benjamin Hendricks, Purdue University (Nitish Thakor Lab, Biomedical Engineering)

Jennifer Hernandez Muniz, University of Puerto Rico (Warren Grayson Lab, Biomedical Engineering)

Alyssa Kosmides, Rutgers University (Jordan Green Lab, Biomedical Engineering)

Allatah Mekile, East Stroudburg University (Jeff Wang Lab/CCNE, Mechanical Engineering)

Evelyn Okeke, City University of New York (Doug Robinson Lab, Cell Biology)

Thea Roper, North Carolina State University (Sharon Gerecht Lab/PSOC, Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering)

Nailah Seale, Howard University (Warren Grayson Lab, Biomedical Engineering)

Justin Samorajski, University of Dallas (Peter Searson Lab/CCNE, Materials Science and Engineering)

Quinton Smith, University of New Mexico (Sharon Gerecht Lab/PSOC, Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering)

Diane H. Yoon, Rice University (Hai-Quan Mao Lab, Materials Science and Engineering)

Mary Zuniga, Northern Arizona University (David Gracias Lab, Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering).

Story and photos by Mary Spiro

 

 

 

INBT’s REU gives students 10 weeks to find out if research is for them

Roberto Rivera worked in Nina Markovic’s physics lab. (Photo: Sarah Gubara)

Johns Hopkins University was founded as a research university. But the fact is, research is not the best career path for everyone. That’s why Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology offers a 10-week summer research internship for undergraduate students. There’s no better way to find out if research is for you than to actually do it.

During the summer of 2010, 16 students from universities across the country were admitted into INBT’s highly competitive Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) funded by the National Science Foundation. This was the third year of INBT’s REU program, and this group of scholars represented the Institute’s largest since the program began. Students are mentored by faculty members, graduate students and postdoctoral fellows in INBT affiliated laboratories across Hopkins.

Makeeda Moore conducted research in Sharon Gerecht’s lab. (Photo: Sarah Gubara)

Projects are designed in such a way that students are able to gather relevant data in such a short period of time. At the end of the 10-week research program, they presented their findings at a university-wide collaborative research poster session held with other summer interns from across several divisions at Johns Hopkins. Some students are invited stay on for a few weeks after the conclusion of their program and continue to work in their assigned laboratories. Several REU scholars have been able to subsequently publish peer-reviewed scientific reports with their advisors.

In addition to their academic and research activities, INBT REU participants have the opportunity to live with other summer interns and mingle at organized and impromptu social events. Outings have included cookouts, crab feasts and Orioles baseball games.

Watch a video about the REU poster session here!

Meet the 2010 REU students here.

Applications are no longer accepted for the 2011 REU program.

INBT welcomes 16 summer nanobio research interns

For 10 weeks this summer, 16 students from universities across the country will join the highly competitive Johns Hopkins Institute for Nanobiotechnology (INBT) Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU). The internship is funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and is supported and administered by INBT.

This is the third year of INBT’s REU program, and this group represents the institute’s largest group. Students are being mentored by faculty, graduate students and postdoctoral fellows in INBT affiliated laboratories across Hopkins. At the end of the 10-week research program, they will present their findings at a university-wide collaborative research poster session held with other summer interns from across several divisions.

In November 2009, NSF reported that over the last decade 10 times more white students will have earned doctoral degrees in science and engineering disciplines than minority students. Acknowledging this fact yet resolving not to accept it as status quo, INBT has employed aggressive measures to increase the number of individuals from underrepresented groups who apply to its educational programs.

“The nanobiotechnology REU has been one of the most successful and popular programs for INBT,” says Ashanti Edwards, senior education program coordinator for the institute. “The program has consistently attracted the best and the brightest students interested in research from top universities across the nation. The REU program was launched as a conduit to attract highly talented and motivated research students to pursue academic careers in research, particularly women and minority scholars. The program is highly competitive. For summer 2010, the number of applicants for the 10 slots in the program rose to nearly 500, twice what it had been the year before.”

Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology Summer REU Students. (Photos by Mary Spiro)

INBT’s summer 2010 REU students include pictured from top to bottom, from left to right:

Top row

Joshua Austin, computer science and math major from UMBC, is working with Jeff Gray, associate professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering, Whiting School of Engineering.

Mary Bedard, biochemistry and Spanish major from Elon University, is working with J.D. Tovar, assistant professor of chemistry, Krieger School of Arts and Sciences.

Kameron Black, neuroscience major from the University of California, Riverside, is working in the lab of Ted Dawson, professor of neuroscience, School of Medicine

Obafemi Ifelowo, who majors in molecular biology, biochemistry and bioinformatics at Towson University, is working with Jordan Green, assistant professor of biomedical engineering, School of Medicine.

Second row

Alfred Irungu, mechanical engineering major at UMBC, is working with German Drazer, assistant professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering, Whiting School of Engineering.

Ceslee Montgomery, human biology major from Stanford University, is working in the lab of Doug Robinson, associate professor of cell biology, School of Medicine.

Makeda Moore, biology major from Alabama A & M University, is working with Sharon Gerecht, assistant professor of chemical and biomolecular Engineering, Whiting School of Engineering.

Christopher Ojeda, biomedical engineering major from New Jersey Institute of Technology, is working in the lab of Michael Yu, assistant professor of Materials Science and Engineering, Whiting School of Engineering.

Third row

Katrin Passlack, mechanical engineering and kinesiology major at the University of Oklahoma, is working with Jeff Wang, associate professor of mechanical engineering, Whiting School of Engineering.

Roberto Rivera, chemical engineering major from the University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez, is working in the lab of Nina Markovic, associate professor of physics, Krieger School of Arts and Sciences.

D. Kyle Robinson, bioengineering major from Oregon State University, is working in the lab of Denis Wirtz, professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering, Whiting School of Engineering. In addition, Kyle is the first REU intern for Johns Hopkins new Engineering in Oncology Center, of which Wirtz is director.

Russell Salamo, biology major from the University of Arkansas, is working with Kalina Hristova, associate professor of materials science and engineering, Whiting School of Engineering.

Bottom row

Quinton Smith, major in chemical engineering with a bioengineering concentration from the University of New Mexico, is working with Sharon Gerecht, assistant professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering, Whiting School of Engineering.

David To, chemistry major from Wittenberg University, is working with assistant professor Hai-Quan Mao in the department of materials science and engineering, Whiting School of Engineering.

Alan Winter, biology systems engineering major from Kansas State University, is working with Professor Peter Searson in the department of materials science and engineering, Whiting School of Engineering. Searson is the director of INBT.

Mary Zuniga, biology major a Northern Arizona University, is working in the lab of David Gracias, associate professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering, Whiting School of Engineering.

Related Links:

Johns Hopkins NanoBio Research Experience for Undergraduates