Podcast: Artificial blood vessel visualizes cancer cell journey

Researchers from Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology are visualizing many of the steps involved in how cancer cells break free from tumors and travel through the blood stream, potentially on their way to distant organs.  Using an artificial blood vessel developed in the laboratory of Peter Searson, INBT director and professor of materials science and engineering, scientists are looking more closely into the complex journey of the cancer cell.

Figure 1. 3D projection of a confocal z-stack shows human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) forming a functional vessel immunofluorescently stained for PECAM-1 (green) and nuclei (blue).

Figure 1. 3D projection of a confocal z-stack shows human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) forming a functional vessel immunofluorescently stained for PECAM-1 (green) and nuclei (blue). (Wong/Searson Lab)

INBT’s science writer, Mary Spiro, interviewed device developer Andrew Wong, a doctoral student Searson’s  lab, for the NanoByte Podcast. Wong is an INBT training grant student. Listen to NANOBYTE #101 at this link.

Wong describes the transparent device, which is made up of a cylindrical channel lined with human endothelial cells and housed within a gel made of collagen, the body’s structural protein that supports living tissues. A small clump of metastatic breast cancer cells is seeded in the gel near the vessel while a nutrient rich fluid was pumped through the channel to simulate blood flow. By adding fluorescent tags the breast cancer cells, the researchers were able to track the cells’ paths over multiple days under a microscope.

VIDEO: Watch how a cancer cell approaches the artificial blood vessel, balls up and then forces its way through the endothelial cells and into the streaming fluids within the channel of the device. (Video by Searson Lab)

The lab-made device allows researchers to visualize how “a single cancer cell degrades the matrix and creates a tunnel that allows it to travel to the vessel wall,” says Wong. “The cell then balls up, and after a few days, exerts a force that disrupts the endothelial cells. It is then swept away by the flow. “

Wong said his next goal will be to use the artificial blood vessel to investigate different cancer treatment strategies, such as chemotherapeutic drugs, to find ways to improve the targeting of drug-resistant tumors.

Results of their experiments with this device were published in the journal Cancer Research in September.

Andrew Wong (left) and Peter Searson. (Photo by Will Kirk/Homewood Photography)

Andrew Wong (left) and Peter Searson. (Photo by Will Kirk/Homewood Photography)

Check out this gallery of images from the Searson Lab. The captions are as follows:
Figure 1. 3D projection of a confocal z-stack shows human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) forming a functional vessel immunofluorescently stained for PECAM-1 (green) and nuclei (blue).
Figure 2. 3D projection of a confocal z-stack shows human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) forming a vessel with dual-labeled MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells on the periphery.
Figure 3. Phase-contrast and fluorescence overlays depicting a functional vessel comprised of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) with dual-labeled MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells on the periphery (green in the nucleus, red in the cytoplasm).

 

 

Podcast: Nanotech method to study cell detachment could lead to improved cancer therapies

Peter Searson

Peter Searson

Cancer spreads from organ to organ when cells break free from one site and travel to another. Understanding this process, known as metastasis, is critical for developing ways to prevent the spread and growth of cancer cells. Peter Searson, Reynolds Professor of Materials Science and Engineering in the Whiting School of Engineering and director of the Institute for NanoBioTechnology, led a team of engineers who have developed a method to specifically measure detachment in individual cells.

The method, which uses lab-on-a-chip technology, allows researchers to observe and record the exact point when a cell responds to electrochemical cues in its environment and releases from the surface upon which it is growing. Better knowledge of the biochemistry of cell detachment could point the way to better cancer therapies. In this “Great Ideas” podcast, Elizabeth Tracey, communications associate for the School of Medicine, interviews Searson about this current research.

“…We know that processes like cell detachment are important in cancer metastasis, where cells become detached from tumors…” Peter Searson

Click here to listen:  Great Ideas Podcast: Peter Searson

Related links:

You can watch a video and read more about Searson’s method of studying cell detachment here.

Peter Searson’s INBT profile page.

This podcast was originally posted to the Johns Hopkins University “Great Ideas” web page. To view the original posting, click here.