Meet INBT’s summer interns, already digging into their research

Research does not take a holiday during the summer at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Md. In fact, it ramps up with the addition of many new faces from across the country.

The Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology summer research interns have arrived and are already busy at work in various laboratories. This year’s group is the largest the institute has ever hosted, with 17 undergraduates from universities nationwide.

Of the total, three students are affiliated with the Center of Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence and four are affiliated with the Physical Sciences-Oncology Center. The remaining 10 are part of the National Science Foundation Research Experience for Undergraduates program. All are hosted through INBT, which serves as a hub for their academic and social activities.

INBT summer interns conduct 10 weeks of research in a laboratory either on the Homewood or the medical campus of the University. At the end of that time, students have learned how to work in a multidisciplinary team and how to manage a short term research project.  They also discover if research is a pathway they want to pursue after earning their bachelor’s degrees.

In August, interns from many of the science, medicine, engineering and public health summer programs will gather for a  poster session to be held on August 2 at 3 p.m. in Turner Concourse. The poster session will allow students to show off the results of their their work.

This year’s INBT/PS-OC/CCNE interns include:

At the Whiting School of Engineering…

Amani Alkayyali from Wayne State University is an REU student in the laboratory of Honggang Cui assistant professor in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering. Also in the Cui lab are CCNE intern Matthew Fong from the University of California, Berkeley and Michelle LaComb, an REU student from Rice University.

Sharon Gerecht, assistant professor in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular engineering, is hosting three interns. Josh Porterfield of Cornell University and Carolyn Zhang from the University of California, San Diego are both PS-OC interns, and Bria Macklin of Howard University is an REU intern.

Jacqueline Carozza of Cornell University is a PS-OC student working in the lab of Denis Wirtz, professor in the Department Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering. Cassandra Loren from Oregon State University is a PS-OC intern also working in the Wirtz lab.

Eric Do from the University of Washington is an REU working in the lab of assistant professor Margarita Herrara-Alonso in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering.

Olivia Hentz from Cornell is an REU student working in the lab of Jonah Erlebacher, professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering.

Justin Samorajski from the University of Dallas is a returning summer intern, once again working in the materials science and engineering lab of professor Peter Searson as part of the CCNE.

At the School of Medicine…

Lauren Lee of Cornell University is an REU working in the lab of biomedical engineering lab of associate professor Hai-Quan Mao.

Albert Lu from the University of California Berkeley is a CCNE intern working in the biomedical engineering lab of associate professor Jeff Wang.

Bianca Lascano from Norfolk State University is an REU in assistant professor Jordan Green’s biomedical engineering lab.

Charlie Nusbaum of the Richard Stockton College is an REU intern in the radiation oncology lab of assistant professor Robert Ivkov.

At the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences…

Anthony Loder of Rowan University is an REU working in the biology lab of assistant professor Xin Chen.

Daniel McClelland is also REU from Bethany College works in the chemistry laboratory of professor Howard Fairbrother.

 

 

In vivo visualization of angiogenesis during wound healing featured on journal cover

Laser speckle contrast images showing (l-r) sequential images of the in vivo blood flow changes that occur on days 0, 3, 5, 7, 10 and 12 after wound creation.

Innovative ways of imaging wound healing can reveal much about blood vessel remodeling and blood flow following an injury. Researchers in the Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science and Department of Biomedical Engineering at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine have developed a method for using laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) to elucidate the changes that occur in the microvasculature over time as a wound heals. Researchers in the laboratory of Arvind P. Pathak have visualized the wound healing process in a mouse ear model by capturing images of angiogenesis—or the development of new blood vessels—over a 12-day period.

“LSCI is a powerful tool for observing the architecture and remodeling of microvasculature as well as the hemodynamic changes (blood flow) during angiogenesis,” said Pathak, an assistant professor of radiology and oncology and principal investigator on the study. “Being able to watch this process occur in a living animal helps us better understand the role of the vasculature during various phases of the wound healing process.”

Stunning images obtained from their experiments were featured on the cover of the March issue of the journal Angiogenesis. The LSCI images shown on the cover from left to right are sequential images of the in vivo blood flow changes that occur on days 0, 3, 5, 7, 10 and 12 after wound creation. The “hotter” colors indicate higher blood flow. The background image is a grayscale LSCI image from an uninjured mouse ear.

Wound healing typically proceeds in three phases, Pathak explained: inflammation (which initiates the immune response and recruits immune cells and molecules to the injury), proliferation (the formation of new blood vessels and epithelium) and remodeling (which removes the vascular scar created during blood vessel formation). LSCI is ideal for imaging the progression of each phase because it can monitor in vivo changes in microvascular architecture and hemodynamics at the same time, he said.

LSCI images are created when tissue illuminated by a laser is photographed through a small aperture, explained Pathak. “The resulting images exhibit a random interference pattern, also called a ‘speckle’ pattern. In blood vessels, this speckle pattern shifts due to the orderly motion of red blood cells, causing a blur over the exposure time of the camera. The degree of blurring in the LSCI image is proportional to the velocity of blood in the vessels and constitutes the biophysical basis of LSCI. Therefore, LSCI can distinguish blood vessels in tissue without any fluorescent dye or contrast agent.”

In this way, Pathak added, LSCI is capable of “wide area mapping” of the tissue, allowing us to measure not only the length and perfusion of blood vessels but their tortuosity (twistiness) and the overall flow of blood to the wound site as healing progresses.

In addition to angiogenesis research, the imaging method has practical applications in drug testing, Pathak said. “Using LSCI alongside a drug study would provide better insight into the efficacy of drug delivery and therapeutic outcome,” he said.

The lead author of the paper was Abhishek Rege, a graduate student in biomedical engineering co-mentored by Pathak and Nitish V. Thakor, professor of biomedical engineering in whose neuroengineering laboratory LSCI was developed. Kevin Rhie, a research technician in Pathak’s laboratory was the other author on this study.

This work was supported jointly by a Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBiotechnology (INBT) Junior Faculty Pilot Award to Pathak, and grants from the National Institute of Aging and the Department of Health and Human Services to Thakor.

Story by Mary Spiro

Princeton physicist to discuss physics of cancer cell resistance

Physics professor Robert Austin, right, and graduate ¬student Guillaume Lambert observe prostate cancer cells growing on chips of silicon and silicon-based plastic. (Princeton Office of Communications)

The fact that cancer cells frequently re-emerge after initial therapeutic attempts has dogged the efforts of oncologists to save patients’ lives for decades. According to Princeton physicist, Robert H. Austin, cancer cell resistance is primarily a biological reaction to stress and “one of the great unsolved, and deadly, problems in oncology.”

On Thursday, February 4, Austin will discuss, “The Physics of Cancer,” during a 3 p.m. joint colloquium hosted by Johns Hopkins University departments of Physics and Astronomy and Biophysics in the Schafler auditorium of the Bloomberg Center on the Homewood campus. The talk is free and open to the public.

Austin is principal investigator for Princeton’s Physical Science-Oncology Center and a trans-network partner with Johns Hopkins Engineering in Oncology Center, both of which are National Cancer Institute funded organizations.

Austin will address the general principles of physics, ecology, and biology and why recurrence of resistant cancer cells seems to be a universal phenomenon in cancer. He says that “evolution in small, stressed habitats is key to the rapid and inevitable re-emergence of resistance of cancer cells” (and) “that modern techniques of physical probes, genomics, proteomics and nanotechnology will allow us to analyze the evolutionary path of these emergent resistant cells.”

Related Links

Johns Hopkins Engineering in Oncology Center

Flyer for  Prof. Austin’s colloquium

Physical Sciences in Oncology Centers of the National Cancer Institute