My summer internship at Novozymes

Over this past summer, I had the opportunity to complete a 3-month internship with a biotechnology company near Raleigh, North Carolina. Novozymes, headquartered in Denmark, produces some microorganisms and biopharmaceutical ingredients, but their main focus is the production of enzymes for industrial use. These enzymes go to customers in the household care, food and beverage, and bioenergy industries, to name a few. Some of Novozymes’ customers you may be familiar with include Procter & Gamble (Tide laundry detergent), Nabisco (Ritz crackers), and Anheuser Busch. My summer was spent in the Research & Development department working with enzymes for biofuel production.

The corn-to-ethanol process consists of two main stages. Briefly, corn is ground, and an alpha-amylase enzyme is added to solubilize and start to break down the starch. This stage, called liquefaction, takes approximately two hours. Next, in the fermentation stage, starch is broken down further with a glucoamylase enzyme and is fermented into ethanol using yeast over the course of two to three days. Ethanol is then used as a gasoline supplement; it can increase octane rating and improve vehicle emissions.

My first task as a Novozymes intern consisted of an internal assay development project seeking to increase the throughput of corn fermentation enzyme screenings. Novozymes is planning to purchase a new liquid-handler robot to automate and quicken the lab-scale fermentation process as they test which enzyme blends can obtain the best ethanol yields. It was my job to optimize parameters such as mixing and venting within the new system and test if it could match results from conventional screening methods.

A separate project that I focused on during the second half of the summer involved a joint effort between the Research & Development and Technical Solutions departments to formulate new product blends for liquefaction and fermentation of milo, or sorghum, a grain similar to corn. Milo may provide an advantage over corn because it is not a main ingredient in food manufacturing and may help keep grocery prices down. Milo may provide an environmental advantage as well, as it is more tolerant of drought than corn crops and requires less water. This project was especially interesting in that I was able to experience some of the business applications side of research and development. In formulating new product blends, our team had to keep in mind what process conditions and enzyme prices potential customers would be willing to agree with.

Everyone at Novozymes was extremely friendly and willing to help. The internship program at the Franklinton, North Carolina location, which houses the company’s North American headquarters, is fairly large, so I was able to meet about 20 other interns at both the undergraduate and graduate school levels. The People & Organization department (a.k.a Human Resources) organized a networking lunch with site managers as well as a career prep workshop and resume review. We also attended a Carolina Mudcats baseball game, and an ice cream truck came around the work site to give out free ice cream every few weeks! Of course, there was always enough Carolina barbeque and sweet tea to go around.

Overall, my Novozymes internship was a well-rounded, enjoyable, and valuable experience. In addition to the Franklinton site, Novozymes operates in Virginia, California, Nebraska, and all over the world. The company offers internship and co-op positions at many of these locations. If you are interested, I highly recommended checking out their career site for available opportunities!

Story by Allison Chambliss, who is entering her fifth year as a PhD student in the laboratory of Denis Wirtz in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering.