2014 BioNano summer institute to be held at University of Illinois

It’s like summer camp for nanobiotechnology.

nanobioinstituteuofiThe 2014 BioNano summer institute will be held at University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, July 28 to August 8. Click on this link for a pdf flyer.

Come for two weeks of lectures and hands-on training in engineering, biological, and physical science laboratory techniques covering topics such as cancer nanotechnology, cell mechanics, cell biology, molecular biology, lab-on-a-chip, and NanoBio devices. The institute is accepting applications from advanced undergraduates, graduate students, post-docs, and faculty from engineering, physical sciences, and biological sciences who are interested in state-of-the-art interdisciplinary research at the intersection of engineering and biology.

Applications must be received by midnight on Friday, March 28, 2014. Find details and apply online at this link: nano.illinois.edu/summer-institute-2014.

Lectures come from California Institute of Technology, Georgia Institute of Technology, Harvard University, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Northwestern University, Stanford University, University of California Berkeley, University of California Merced, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of Kentucky, and industry. The cost is $1,500/selected participant and breakfast and lunch each weekday and dormitory housing is included from July 27-August 8. NOTE: Limited financial assistance may be available toward the registration fee. If you wish to attend and require financial help, please indicate your request on the application form.

 

Hopkins’ Herrera-Alonso earns NSF CAREER award

Margarita Herrera-Alonso

Margarita Herrera-Alonso, assistant professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, has received the National Science Foundation CAREER Award. Herrera’s CAREER funding will support her goal of better understanding the structure and property relationships of new polymers inspired by nature.

Her research will enable these building blocks to be used in the context of other bio-inspired materials applications, such as drug carrier design. The CAREER Award recognizes the highest levels of excellence and promise in early-career scholars and teachers.

Herrera joined the Johns Hopkins University faculty in early 2010. She is an affiliated faculty member of Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology. She earned her PhD in polymer science and engineering from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. Find out more about the projects the Herrera Group is working on at this website.

 

Agenda set for Oct. 10 mini-symposium on cancer, nanotech

From the spring mini-symposium.

Johns Hopkins Physical Sciences-Oncology Center and Center of Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence will host a mini-symposium on Monday Oct., 10 in the Hackerman Hall Auditorium. Talks on topics related to cancer and nanotechnology begin at 9 a.m.

Speakers include:

  • 9:15 a.m.: The pulsating motion of breast cancer cell is regulated by surrounding epithelial cells. Speaker: Meng Horng Lee
  • 9:40 a.m.: Breast tumor extracellular matrix promotes vasculogenesis. Speaker: Abigail Hielscher
  • 10:00 a.m.: Attachment to growth substrate regulates expression of GDF15, an important molecule in metastatic cancer. Speaker: Koh Meng Aw Yong
  • 10:20 a.m.: Mucin 16 is a functional selectin ligand on pancreatic cancer cells. Speaker: Jack Chen
  • 10:40 a.m.: Particle tracking in vivo. Speaker: Pei-Hsun Wu

These talks are open to the entire Hopkins community. No RSVP is required. Refreshments will be served.

 

 

Breast cancer highlighted at Homewood mini-symposium

A tumor cell breaking free and entering the blood stream. (From animation by Ella McCrea, Nathan Weiss and Martin Rietveld)

Breast cancer will be topic of at least two of the talks planned for a mini-symposium October 10 on the Homewood campus.

UPDATED: Click here for updated list of talk titles.

Students from Johns Hopkins Physical Sciences-Oncology Center (PSOC) and Center of Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence (CCNE) will hold their second mini-symposium of the year on October 10 at 9 a.m. in Hackerman Hall Auditorium. The symposia, scheduled each spring and fall on the Homewood campus, encourage an exchange of ideas between PhD students and postdoctoral fellows associated with these centers. The entire Hopkins community is invited to attend, and no RSVP is required.

Some of the talk titles include, from the department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, “The Pulsing Motion of Breast Cancer Cell is Regulated by Surrounding Epithelial Cells” presented by Meng Horng Lee, a PSOC postdoctoral fellow in the Denis Wirtz lab; “Breast Tumor Extracellular Matrix Promotes Vasculogenesis” presented by Abigail Hielscher, a postdoctoral fellow in the Sharon Gerecht lab; and “Mucin 16 is a Functional Selectin Ligand on Pancreatic Cancer Cells” given by Jack Chen, a pre-doctoral fellow in the lab of Konstantinos Konstantopoulos. Additional speakers include postdoctoral fellow Pei-Hsun Wu, PhD, a from the Wirtz Lab and Koh Meng Aw Yong, a pre-doctoral student affiliated with Princeton University’s Physical Sciences-Oncology Center.

The purpose of these twice a year, student run mini-symposia is to facilitate communication among researchers working in laboratories studying the mechanistic aspects of cancer spread (i.e., those affiliated with the PSOC) and those working on novel means of using nanotechnology for cancer diagnosis or treatment (i.e., those associated with the CCNE). Anjil Giri coordinated the fall mini-symposium, a PSOC pre-doctoral fellow in the Wirtz lab , with Erbil Abaci, a PSOC pre-doctoral fellow with in the Gerecht lab. Visit the INBT website (inbt.jhu.edu) for further details, as additional speakers and talk titles will be announced.

Money makes the (research) world go ‘round

Photo Illustration by Mary Spiro.

Grant money drives research, but obtaining funding can be a daunting task for those unfamiliar with the process. Wouldn’t it be nice to have someone to show you the ropes?

That’s why three postdoctoral fellows from Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology were asked to present a sort of crash course in how to get those almighty research dollars. The talk, given as one of INBT’s professional development seminars on July 27 to a group of graduate, undergraduate and a few high school summer research interns, covered basics, as well as some commonly overlooked issues encountered in the grant application process.

“When applying for grant funds you have to assume that everyone else also has a good idea. Your idea has to be better than great; it has to be outstanding,” Eric Balzer told attendees. Balzer is a postdoctoral fellow with professor Konstantinos Konstantopoulos in the department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering.

He also advised the group to avoid novice grant writing errors such as “submitting a proposal on lung cancer to an agency that only funds breast cancer research.” In other words, read the funding agency’s mission statement.

Yanique Rattigan stressed the importance of avoiding overly complex language in grant applications. “Grant reviewers often include patient representatives who are not scientists and engineers, so you have to make sure that there is a section describing the research in lay terms that they can understand,” offered Rattigan, who is conducting research in the pathology lab of professor Anirban Maitra at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.

Granting agencies look to fund novel research ideas, explained Daniele Gilkes. “They want to know how your work will fill in the knowledge gaps that exist in the field. You can determine this through thorough analysis of the current literature pertinent to your area of research,” added Gilkes, who works with Denis Wirtz, the Smoot Professor of Engineering in the Department of Chemical and Bimolecular Engineering.”

The group stressed the need to edit and re-edit a grant application prior to submission, and emphasized the importance of choosing the right referee to compose letters that truly support the candidates potential for independent research.

The teams’ insight into the grant application process can be found in this SlideShare slide show, click here.

Story by Mary Spiro.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Collagen video scores high in magazines reader’s choice vote

Screen capture from INBT’s video on collagen mimetic peptides.

The Scientist magazine has announced its annual Multimedia Awards—the Labbys—and Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology’s video on collagen mimetic peptides has been selected as a finalist. According to the voting, we are a strong second in the race. It appears voting is continuing well past the original June 30 deadline. So keep voting!

Help choose us as the top science video by going to this website (http://the-scientist.com/2011/06/15/2011-labby-video-finalists/#vote)  and selecting “Mimicking Collagen.” The video features Michael Yu, associate professor of materials science and engineering and some fantastic animations and illustration from INBT’s Animation studio. Animations in the video were created by Ella McCrea, a graduate from the Maryland Institute College of Art, and Nathan Weiss, a masters graduate from Johns Hopkins University.

Winners of the reader’s choice will be announced in the magazine and online in September. Top picks will also be chosen by The Scientist’s panel of judges, which includes the father of the infographic Nigel Holmes, Kirsten Sanford of the Science Channel (aka Dr. KiKi), Jeffrey Segall of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City, and David Kirby of the University of Manchester.

You can only vote once, so share this link with your friends.

 

 

Come to the NanoBio Film Festival 11 a.m., 6/29 in Krieger 205

Charli Dvoracek storyboarding a video. Photo by Mary Spiro

Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology (INBT) hosts the NanoBio Film Festival on June 29, 11 a.m. in Krieger 205. See the world premiere of three short videos made by members of INBT’s course on science communications. Free for Hopkins community.

Videos featured in this film festival describe the current research of students working in INBT affiliated laboratories. Students in the course learn how to communicate their work in nontechnical terms for general audiences. They work in teams to write, direct, film and produce the videos within a two-week time frame. The producers will be on hand to describe their experience making the videos and to answer questions.

The INBT film festival is part of the institute’s free professional development seminar series. Topics are geared toward undergraduate and graduate students.

Future seminars include:

  • July 13: Adam Steel, PhD, Director of Systems Engineering at Becton Dickinson, will discuss medical device development. Dr. Steel joined BD in 2005. Previously he was vice president of research and development at MetriGenix. He earned his PhD in analytical chemistry at the University of Maryland College Park and undergraduate degrees in chemistry and mathematics from Gettysburg College. He completed a postdoctoral fellowship in medical device development at the National Institutes of Standards and Technology.
  • July 27: Grant submission process and how to obtain funding; a roundtable discussion with INBT affiliated postdoctoral students.

For additional information on INBT’s professional development seminar series, contact Ashanti Edwards, INBT’s Academic Program Administrator at Ashanti@jhu.edu.

 

 

Drazer wins NSF Career Award

German Drazer

German Drazer (Photo: Will Kirk)

German Drazer, assistant professor in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering and affiliated faculty member of Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology was recently named a recipient of the National Science Foundation Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) awards, given in recognition of a young scientist’s commitment to research and education. Drazer was given the award for “Deterministic and Stochastic Transport of Suspended Particles in Periodic Systems: Fundamentals and Applications in Separation Science.” The grant will support his investigations into the transport phenomena that arise in the motion of suspended particles in spatially periodic systems, and the translation of these phenomena into new principles for the manipulation of suspended particles in fluidic devices.

Read more about the work in the Drazer Lab here.

INBT researchers use LEGO to study what happens inside lab-on-a-chip devices

INBT, EOC directors named AAAS 2009 Fellows

The Johns Hopkins Whiting School of Engineering faculty members who direct the Institute for NanoBioTechnology and Engineering in Oncology Center both have been awarded the distinction of AAAS Fellow. Election as a Fellow is an honor bestowed upon AAAS members by their peers.

Peter Searson, INBT director. Photo by Will Kirk/JHU

Peter Searson, INBT director. Photo by Will Kirk/JHU

Denis Wirtz, EOC director. Photo by Will Kirk/JHU

Denis Wirtz, EOC director. Photo by Will Kirk/JHU

Peter C. Searson, the Joseph R. and Lynn C. Reynolds Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, was named for distinguished contributions to the field of surface chemistry and nanoscience. His research interests include surface and molecular engineering, and semiconductor quantum dots.

Searson directs the interdivisional Institute for NanoBioTechnology launched in May 2006, which brings together researchers from medicine, engineering, the sciences, and public health to create new knowledge and develop new technologies to revolutionize health care and medicine. INBT currently has more than 190 affiliated faculty members. Searson has secondary appointments in the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences Department of Physics and Astronomy and the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine Department of Oncology.

Denis Wirtz, the Theophilus H. Smoot Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, was elected for his contributions to cell micromechanics and cell adhesion. He also was distinguished for his development and application for particle tracking methods to probe the micromechanical properties of living cells in normal conditions and disease state. Wirtz studies the biophysical properties of healthy and diseased cells, including interactions between adjacent cells and the role of cellular architecture on nuclear shape and gene expression.

Wirtz directs the newly formed Johns Hopkins Engineering in Oncology Center. The EOC is a Physical Sciences in Oncology program center of the National Cancer Institute launched in October 2009 with a $14.8 million grant from the National Institutes of Health. EOC brings together experts in cancer biology, molecular and cellular biophysics, applied mathematics, materials science, and physics to study and model cellular mobility and the assorted biophysical forces involved in the spread of cancer. Wirtz also serves as co-director of the Institute for NanoBioTechnology and has a joint appointment in the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine Department of Oncology.

A total of seven Johns Hopkins faculty members were elected to AAAS this year. Read about all of them in a Johns Hopkins University press release listed in the links below.

This year 531 members have been awarded this honor by AAAS because of their scientifically or socially distinguished efforts to advance science or its applications. New Fellows will be presented with an official certificate and a gold and blue (representing science and engineering, respectively) rosette pin on Feb. 20 at the AAAS Fellows Forum during the 2010 AAAS Annual Meeting in San Diego.  AAAS Fellows were announced in the AAAS News & Notes section of the journal Science on Dec. 18,  2009.

Story by Mary Spiro with materials provided by AAAS.

Seven Johns Hopkins Researchers Named 2009 AAAS Fellows

Searson Group Lab page

Wirtz Group Lab page

Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology

Whiting School of Engineering

Nano education website features INBT mission, programs

The website TryNano.org now features a comprehensive article on Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology  (INBT) and its mission, programs and outreach.

Visit INBT's profile on TryNano.org.

Visit INBT’s profile on TryNano.org.

The TryNano.org website contains feature articles, links, information boxes, videos, and interviews with professionals focused on research and applications of matter at the nanoscale. Generally, the nanoscale is considered to be dimensions from 1 to 100 nanometers, with 1 nm equal to 10-9m. This site strives to a one-stop resource for students, parents, educators and professionals seeking information about nanoscience and nanotechnology. Trynano.org is sponsored by IBM, IEEE and TryScience.

To check out INBT’s profile on TryNano.org, click here.