Cui featured speaker for Society of Biomaterials talk on nano

Join the Society for Biomaterials for their last meeting of the semester today, December 4 at 5 p.m. in Maryland Hall room 109 on the Homewood campus of Johns Hopkins University. Honggang Cui, assistant professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering, will present “How Nano Impacts Medicine.” Refreshments will be served. Cui is an affiliated faculty member of Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology.

Here is an abstract for Dr. Cui’s talk:

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Honggang Cui

From the dawn of civilization, humans have recognized the therapeutic effect of some natural herbs, and the use of plants as therapeutic agents is a long-standing practice throughout the human history. However, the major advance in medicine did not start until the mid-19th century when the active compounds could be actually isolated, purified and identified. The identification of the active compound and its pharmacophore allows not only for the administration of drugs with a known dose, but more importantly for the synthesis of modified drugs with improved efficacy.

Nowadays, modern pharmacology has become part of our daily living, greatly improving the quality of life and transforming the way we live. However, there are still many incurable diseases, such as cancer, that medicine has yet to provide a solution. The emergence of nanotechnology as a field in 1980s has impacted many scientific disciplines including medicine. In particular, nanotechnology-based medicine has entered clinical use over the past two decades.

Can nano help provide a revolutionary solution to cancer? And how could the uses of nano improve the current clinical practice in cancer treatments? This lecture will provide a brief overview of the impact that nanotechnology could have on medicine.

 

 

 

Johns Hopkins and UVa co-host 2-day imaging workshop

Learn about state-of-the-art imaging methods at the In Vivo Preclinical Imaging: an Introductory Workshop, March 20-21 at Johns Hopkins University’s School of Medicine Turner Auditorium. Co-hosted by Johns Hopkins University, the University of Virginia and the Society of Nuclear Medicine (SNM), this workshop will bring together gifted lecturers to cover the fundamentals of in vivo small animal imaging.

The workshop will cover an incredible breadth of material of interest and value to physicians, scientists (including postdoctoral fellows and graduate students) and scientific laboratory professionals interested in using molecular imaging for in vivo biomedical applications. Individuals with experience in small animal imaging as well as beginners are welcome. Participants learn the fundamentals of various small animal imaging modalities. A limited number of participants will also have the opportunity to register to attend a half-day, hands on workshop held on the afternoon of the second day, March 21. Registration for this unique opportunity is on first-come first-served, so don’t wait to register.

Speakers will address imaging modalities including MRI and MRS, PET, SPECT, optical imaging (bioluminescence & fluorescence imaging/tomography), ultrasound, x-ray CT, photoacoustic imaging and multimodality imaging. Speakers will also examine instrumentation, acquisition and reconstruction, MR/SPECT/PET imaging probes, targets and applications, small animal handling, techniques for imaging infectious disease models and data analysis.

More information about the workshop, including a full agenda of topics, registration and details about transportation and lodging can be found at the workshop website. www.snm.org/pci2012.

 

Environmental, health impacts of engineered nanomaterials theme of INBT’s annual symposium

By 2015, the National Science Foundation reports that the nanotechnology industry could be worth as much as $1 trillion. Nanomaterials have many beneficial applications for industry, medicine and basic scientific research. However, because nanomaterials are just a few atoms in size, they also may pose potential risks for human health and the environment.

Cross-sectional autoradiograms of rodent brains showing (A) control physiological state; and (B) and (C) showing distribution of brain injury from an injected neurotoxicant. Red areas indicate the highest concentrations of a biomarker that identifies brain areas that are damaged by the neurotoxicant. (Guilarte Lab/JHU)

Cross-sectional autoradiograms of rodent brains showing (A) control physiological state; and (B) and (C) showing distribution of brain injury from an injected neurotoxicant. Red areas indicate the highest concentrations of a biomarker that identifies brain areas that are damaged by the neurotoxicant. (Guilarte Lab/JHU)

To increase awareness of Hopkins’ research in this emerging area of investigation, the theme for the fourth annual symposium hosted by Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology (INBT) will be environmental and health impacts of engineered nanomaterials. INBT’s symposium will be held Thursday, April 29, from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the university’s Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore, Md.

Morning talks in Sheldon Hall by eight Hopkins faculty experts will discuss neurotoxicity, exposure assessment, manufacture and characterization of nanomaterials, policy implications and many other topics. In the afternoon, a poster session will be held in Feinstone Hall featuring nanobiotechnology research from across the university’s divisions.

INBT is seeking corporate sponsorships for the symposium. Interested parties should contact Thomas Fekete, INBT’s director of corporate partnerships at tmfeke@jhu.edu or 410-516-8891.

Media inquiries should be directed to Mary Spiro, INBT’s science writer and media relations director, at mspiro@jhu.edu or 410-516-4802.

A call for posters announcement will be made at a later date.

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