Researchers honored with Presidential career awards

Two Johns Hopkins researchers were honored by the White House for their research achievements, including one biomedical engineer affiliated with Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology (INBT).

Namandje Bumpus, Ph.D., and Jordan Green, Ph.D., of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine are among 105 winners of Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers, which were announced by the White House on Feb. 18. The awards recognize young researchers who are employed or funded by federal agencies “whose early accomplishments show the greatest promise for assuring America’s pre-eminence in science and engineering and contributing to the awarding agencies’ missions,” according to a White House statement.

“These early-career scientists are leading the way in our efforts to confront and understand challenges from climate change to our health and wellness,” President Barack Obama said in the statement. “We congratulate these accomplished individuals and encourage them to continue to serve as an example of the incredible promise and ingenuity of the American people.”

Namandje Bumpus, left, and Jordan Green. CREDIT Keith Weller, Johns Hopkins Medicine

Namandje Bumpus, left, and Jordan Green.
Keith Weller, Johns Hopkins Medicine

Bumpus, an associate professor of medicine and of pharmacology and molecular sciences, also serves as the school of medicine’s associate dean for institutional and student equity. Her research focuses on how the body processes HIV medications, converting them into different molecules, and the actions of those molecules. In recent studies, she has found genetic differences in how people process popular HIV drugs, suggesting genetic testing should have a greater role to play in combating the virus. “Since joining Johns Hopkins in 2010, Namandje has made tremendous progress toward ultimately making HIV treatment more personalized and effective,” says Mark Anderson, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Department of Medicine. “This is a well-deserved recognition of her work, and I look forward to seeing how she will continue to advance the field.”

Green, an associate professor of biomedical engineering, neurosurgery, oncology and ophthalmology, and a member of INBT, was named one of Popular Science’s Brilliant Ten in 2014. He develops nanoparticles that could potentially deliver therapeutics to the precise place in the body where they’re needed — to make tumor cells self-destruct, for example, while leaving healthy cells intact. “Jordan’s innovations and productivity are exceptional, and his findings have very exciting implications for patients,” says Leslie Tung, Ph.D., interim director of the Department of Biomedical Engineering. “He is truly an extraordinary and exemplary early-career scientist, and a wonderful colleague as well.”

The 105 award winners will be recognized at a White House ceremony this spring.

Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine

Symposium speakers 2015: Jordan Green

Neuro X is the title and theme for the May 1 symposium hosted by Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology. The event kicks off with a continental breakfast at 8 a.m. in the Owens Auditorium, between CRB I and CRB II on the Johns Hopkins University medical campus. Talks begin at 9 a.m. Posters featuring multidisciplinary research from across many Hopkins divisions and departments will be on display from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.

One of this year’s speakers is Jordan J. Green, PhD.

Jordan Green, PhD

Jordan Green, PhD

Jordan Green is an associate professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Johns Hopkins University. He graduated from Carnegie Mellon University with a bachelor’s degree in Biomedical Engineering, Chemical Engineering and then attended Massachusetts Institute of Technology to earn his doctorate in Biological Engineering. Green joined the Johns Hopkins faculty in 2008 His research focuses on cellular engineering and nanobiotechnology, with special interests in biomaterials, controlled drug delivery, and gene therapy. The potential of gene therapy and genetic medicine to benefit human health is tremendous as almost all human diseases have a genetic component, from cancer to cardiovascular disease. Methods for drug and gene delivery that are both safe and effective have remained elusive. New insights into understanding and controlling the mechanisms of delivery are required to further advance the field. To accomplish this, Green’s research team is developing a framework where biomaterials and nanoparticles can be rationally designed and computationally modeled. These same biomedical insights can also be used more broadly in the fields of regenerative medicine and nanomedicine.

Dr. Green is working at the chemistry/biology/engineering interface to answer fundamental scientific questions and create innovative technologies and therapeutics that can directly benefit human health. In 2014, Dr. Green was named one of Popular Science magazine’s “Brilliant Ten” list, highlighting young scientists who are revolutionizing their fields. He is also a member of the USA Science and Engineering Festival’s Nifty Fifty, which includes 200 of the most dynamic scientists and engineers in the United States who were selected for their unique ability to inspire the next generation of students to pursue careers in the STEM fields. He and Dr. Alfredo Quiñones-Hinojosa recently won a BioMaryland Center Biotechnology Development Award to advance their work on a biodegradable nanoparticle therapy enabling effective transfection of a patient’s stem cells derived from adipose tissue that are applied directly to the post-operative site of brain cancer.

Additional speakers will be profiled in the next few weeks. To register your poster and for more details visit

For all press inquiries regarding INBT, its faculty and programs, contact Mary Spiro, or 410-516-4802.




INBT’s fall student symposium Nov. 7

An important opportunity in graduate school is to get peer and mentor feedback on results. One of the best ways to do that is to share what you have been working on with your colleagues at a symposium.

Jordan Green

Jordan Green

Come hear the latest updates from Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology’s research centers on Friday, November 7 from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in the Great Hall at Levering on the Homewood campus! Students affiliated with laboratories from the Johns Hopkins Physical Sciences-Oncology Center, Johns Hopkins Center of Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence and INBT will present at this student-organized symposium. This event is free and open to the Johns Hopkins community. Refreshments provided.

The keynote faculty speaker is Jordan Green, associate professor at Johns Hopkins Department of Biomedical Engineering. Green was recently named one of Popular Science magazine’s “Brilliant 10.” Breakfast, networking and introductions begin at 9 a.m.

Student speakers and topics include:
**Kristen Kozielski – Bioreducible nanoparticles for efficient and environmentally triggered siRNA delivery to primary human glioblastoma cells. Jordan Green Lab. 9:30-9:45 a.m.

**Angela Jimenez – Spatio-temporal characterization of tumor growth and invasion in three-dimensions (3D). Denis Wirtz Lab. 9:50-10:05 a.m.

**Amanda Levy – Development of an in vitro system for the study of neuroinflammation. Peter Searson Lab. 10:10- 10:25 a.m.

**Max Bogorad – An engineered microvessel platform for quantitative imaging of drug permeability and absorption.  Peter Searson Lab. 10:30-10:45 a.m.

**Greg Wiedman – Peptide Mediated Methods of Nanoparticle Drug Delivery. Kalina Hristova Lab. 10:50 to 11:05 a.m.

**Jordan Green – Particle-based micro and nanotechnology to treat cancer 11:10 a.m. – 12:10 p.m.

Please RSVP on our Facebook event page here.

For all press inquiries regarding INBT, its faculty and programs, contact Mary Spiro, or 410-516-4802.

Jordan Green named to PopSci’s Brilliant Ten

Jordan Green, Johns Hopkins University associate professor of biomedical engineering and executive committee member for the Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology, was named one of Popular Science magazine’s Brilliant Ten. The magazine recognized “inspired young scientists and engineers … whose ideas will transform the future.”

Jordan Green (Photo by Marty Katz)

Jordan Green (Photo by Marty Katz)

Green’s work focuses on using nanoscale particles made in the shape of footballs that can train the body’s own immune system to tackle cancer cells. Turns out, particles with the elongated ovoid shape have a slightly larger surface area, which gives them an edge over spherical particles. The football-shaped particles did a better job of triggering the immune system to attack the cancer cells.

Green collaborated with Jonathan Schneck, M.D., Ph.D., professor of pathology, medicine and oncology at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. Both are affiliated faculty members of Johns Hopkins Institute for  NanoBioTechnology. Their work was published in the journal Biomaterials on Oct 5, 2013.

Read more about their research here.

Congratulations to Dr. Green for the recognition of your interesting and promising work!

Watch a video where Green explains his work in simple terms using toys.

In cancer fight, one sportsball-shaped particle works better than another

Apparently in the quest to treat or cure cancer, football trumps basketball. Research from the laboratory of Jordan Green, Ph.D., assistant professor of biomedical engineering at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, has shown that elliptical football-shaped microparticles do a better job than basketball-shaped ones in triggering an immune response that attacks cancer cells.

football particles-greenGreen collaborated with Jonathan Schneck, M.D., Ph.D., professor of pathology, medicine and oncology. Both are affiliated faculty members of Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology. Their work was published in the journal Biomaterials on Oct 5.

The particles, which are essentially artificial antigen presenting cells (APCs), are dotted with tumor proteins (antigens) that signal trouble to the immune response. It turns out that flattening the spherical particles into more elliptical, football-like shapes provides more opportunities for the fabricated APCs to come into contact with cells, which helps initiate a stronger immune response.

If you think about it, this makes sense. You can’t tackle someone on the basketball court the way you can on the gridiron.

Read the Johns Hopkins press release here:


Read the journal article here:

Particle shape dependence of CD8+ T cell activation by artificial antigen presenting cells

Nanotechnology for gene therapy

Editor’s Note: The following is a summary of one of the talks from the 2013 Nano-bio Symposium hosted by Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology held May 17. This summary was written by Randall Meyer, a doctoral candidate in the biomedical engineering and a member of the Cancer Nanotechnology Training Center. Look for other symposium summaries on the INBT blog.

One of the key features of nanotechnology is its wide range of applicability across multiple biological scenarios ranging from gene therapy to immune system modulation. Jordan Green, an assistant professor of Biomedical Engineering at Johns Hopkins University, summarized some of the fascinating applications of nanotechnology on which his laboratory has been working. Green is an INBT affiliated faculty member.

One of the Green lab projects involves the design and implementation of nanoparticle based vectors for delivery of genetic material to the cell. Green demonstrated how these particles could be used to deliver DNA and induce expression of a desired gene, or small interfering RNA (siRNA) to silence the expression of a target gene. These genetic therapeutics are being developed to target a wide variety of retinal diseases and cancers.

Jordan Green (Photo by Marty Katz)

Jordan Green (Photo by Marty Katz)


As opposed to viral based vectors for gene therapy, nonviral vectors such as nanoparticles are safer, more flexible in their range of cellular targets, and can carry larger cargoes than viruses, Green explained.


Another project in the Green lab involves the development of micro and nano dimensional artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPCs) for cancer immunotherapy. These aAPCs mimic the natural signals that killer T-cells receive when there is an invader (bacteria, virus, cancer cell, etc.) in the body. The Green lab is currently working with these particles to stimulate the immune system to fight melanoma.


Green Group