Getting WISE about science and engineering

As a graduate student, outreach is an instrumental part of our educational experience, whether we are presenting our recent work at a conference or mentoring a new student who joins the lab. Here at Hopkins, we are presented with ample opportunities that would fall under each of these categories. One of the rewarding activities in which I have participated is the Women in Science and Engineering (WISE) program in partnership with Garrison Forest Schoo (GFS)l, an all-girls school located in Owings Mills, Maryland.

labwarestockThe WISE program is a partnership between GFS and Johns Hopkins University, and each year, around 14 interested juniors and seniors take part in a four-month research program. Students in the WISE program are matched with a graduate student research mentor who could be from a number of Hopkins programs, including the Schools of Engineering, Medicine, Arts and Sciences, and Public Health. The WISE students come to Hopkins for six hours each week, where they are able to participate in laboratory activities, department seminars, group meetings, classes, and even try their hand at a few experiments.

During my second year, I was able to serve as a mentor to two WISE students, and I greatly enjoyed the opportunity to mentor them. It was a wonderful opportunity for me to be able to explain my project on nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems for cancer treatment so that they could understand the research and also be able to explain it to their fellow students and teachers. I wasn’t sure how much they would be able to do, but throughout the course of the program, they were able to learn how to use pipettes, prepare the nanoparticle solutions and even try to culture cells and view them under a microscope. At the conclusion of the program, they both gave ten-minute presentations on all that they learned. Both said that without this program, they might not have strongly considered a future major in a science field but would certainly do that as a result of their experiences.

Again this year, we have another WISE student working in our lab with a first-year Biomedical Engineering graduate student. Between reading some background information on the project, learning how to use the equipment, and even trying a few simple experiments, it has been a busy, but enjoyable, first few weeks in the program.

If you are interested in more information about the WISE program, please visit http://www.gfs.org/academics/the-wise-program/. I would encourage everyone to strongly think about becoming a mentor for a WISE student in the future. It was a rewarding experience for me, and I hope it will continue to push new students into STEM fields for their future careers.

John-Michael Williford is a PhD candidate in biomedical engineering working in the laboratory of Hai-Quan Mao.