Student engineers solve village problems through Global Engineering Innovation Program

Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology hosts teams of students to travel to foreign countries to apply their engineering skills to solve local problems through a program called Global Engineering Innovation. This story, featured in the Johns Hopkins Gazette, describes one of those projects in Nazaçu, along the Amazon River in Brazil: the design and production of a safer cassava mill that reduces the risk of injury. INBT has also hosted teams in Tanzania and India.

GEU design team with the finalized pedal power grain mill in Tanzania (from left to right) Kristen Kosielski, Jeannine Coburn, Iwen Wu and local resident Jackson. (Photo courtesy Jeannine Coburn)

GEU design team with the finalized pedal power grain mill in Tanzania (from left to right) Kristen Kosielski, Jeannine Coburn, Iwen Wu and local resident Jackson. (Photo courtesy Jeannine Coburn)

Said program director Jennifer Elisseeff, the Jules Stein Professor of Ophthalmology at the Wilmer Eye Institute: “This program has enormous potential to have students visit various communities around the world to design and solve real problems that can help people in their daily lives.”

Read more from the Gazette article here.

Read more about the INBT GEI program here.

 

Meet INBT’s summer interns, already digging into their research

Research does not take a holiday during the summer at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Md. In fact, it ramps up with the addition of many new faces from across the country.

The Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology summer research interns have arrived and are already busy at work in various laboratories. This year’s group is the largest the institute has ever hosted, with 17 undergraduates from universities nationwide.

Of the total, three students are affiliated with the Center of Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence and four are affiliated with the Physical Sciences-Oncology Center. The remaining 10 are part of the National Science Foundation Research Experience for Undergraduates program. All are hosted through INBT, which serves as a hub for their academic and social activities.

INBT summer interns conduct 10 weeks of research in a laboratory either on the Homewood or the medical campus of the University. At the end of that time, students have learned how to work in a multidisciplinary team and how to manage a short term research project.  They also discover if research is a pathway they want to pursue after earning their bachelor’s degrees.

In August, interns from many of the science, medicine, engineering and public health summer programs will gather for a  poster session to be held on August 2 at 3 p.m. in Turner Concourse. The poster session will allow students to show off the results of their their work.

This year’s INBT/PS-OC/CCNE interns include:

At the Whiting School of Engineering…

Amani Alkayyali from Wayne State University is an REU student in the laboratory of Honggang Cui assistant professor in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering. Also in the Cui lab are CCNE intern Matthew Fong from the University of California, Berkeley and Michelle LaComb, an REU student from Rice University.

Sharon Gerecht, assistant professor in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular engineering, is hosting three interns. Josh Porterfield of Cornell University and Carolyn Zhang from the University of California, San Diego are both PS-OC interns, and Bria Macklin of Howard University is an REU intern.

Jacqueline Carozza of Cornell University is a PS-OC student working in the lab of Denis Wirtz, professor in the Department Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering. Cassandra Loren from Oregon State University is a PS-OC intern also working in the Wirtz lab.

Eric Do from the University of Washington is an REU working in the lab of assistant professor Margarita Herrara-Alonso in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering.

Olivia Hentz from Cornell is an REU student working in the lab of Jonah Erlebacher, professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering.

Justin Samorajski from the University of Dallas is a returning summer intern, once again working in the materials science and engineering lab of professor Peter Searson as part of the CCNE.

At the School of Medicine…

Lauren Lee of Cornell University is an REU working in the lab of biomedical engineering lab of associate professor Hai-Quan Mao.

Albert Lu from the University of California Berkeley is a CCNE intern working in the biomedical engineering lab of associate professor Jeff Wang.

Bianca Lascano from Norfolk State University is an REU in assistant professor Jordan Green’s biomedical engineering lab.

Charlie Nusbaum of the Richard Stockton College is an REU intern in the radiation oncology lab of assistant professor Robert Ivkov.

At the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences…

Anthony Loder of Rowan University is an REU working in the biology lab of assistant professor Xin Chen.

Daniel McClelland is also REU from Bethany College works in the chemistry laboratory of professor Howard Fairbrother.

 

 

INBT obtains funding for engineering and science missions

Johns Hopkins students helped develop a bicycle-powered grain mill in Tanzania.

Engineering Missions for Graduate Student Education and Local Innovation

Applications are now being accepted for Global Engineering Innovation projects designed to give Johns Hopkins’ graduate students and select undergraduates an opportunity to investigate and tackle engineering challenges in the developing world. Undergraduate and graduate opportunities are available. Application deadline is April 5, 2013.

An information session on the Global Engineering Innovation program will be held on April 12  at 6 p.m. in  room G40 (ground floor conference room) in the New Engineering Building.

Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology has obtained funding to support three engineering mission teams composed of two to four students at a variety of international host sites. Teams will be mentored by an engineering faculty and a faculty member from the host site. Budgets, time lines and project plans will be developed by the team members with assistance by the host site faculty member.

To be eligible to apply, undergraduate and graduate students should be science or engineering majors (other majors will be considered if a fit is evident based on application material). Teams can be predefined by the students prior to applying but each team member must submit all application material. We will attempt to keep predefined teams together but the final decision will be made by the coordination committee (we will add or remove members if we feel a better team composition can be made).

To apply for this unique opportunity, send the following items to Ashanti Edwards at ashanti@jhu.edu.

  • Your resume including any outreach experience (domestic or international) and any foreign language capability (not required)
  • A brief (300 words max.) statement of your interest in Global Engineering Innovation
  • The name and contact information of at least one referee, preferably your faculty research advisor (or academic advisor for undergraduate students)

After teams, mentors and challenges are defined, the team or team leader will travel to the site to further evaluate challenge and design constraints. After return to Baltimore, the teams will meet to further research the challenge and brainstorm potential solutions. The JHU School for Advanced International Studies (SAIS) will be consulted so that students will be aware of the social and political atmosphere that may impact utilization and potential distribution of the engineering solutions. By the end of the first year, the students will have designed a working prototype. The teams will then travel to the Global Site with their working prototype to test solution feasibility and modify as needed. If successful, potential avenues of translation will be investigated with advisory board members with relevant experience.

 

Panel discussion tackles the question: Is undergraduate research for you?

Undergraduates presenting at summer research symposium.

Are you an undergraduate  engineering student who wants to do research but just doesn’t know where to start?

The Johns Hopkins chapter of the Society of Women Engineers  will host a panel discussion Thursday, October 27 at 7 PM in room 132 of Gilman Hall  on the Homewood campus.  The panel discussion is designed to answer your questions about getting started in research at Johns Hopkins University.   Listen to a panel of undergraduate research students in engineering discuss what it’s like to work in an engineering lab.

Undergraduate research experience is extremely important if you want to apply for internships, jobs, scholarships and postgraduate work. Conducting research while you’re an undergraduate also helps put this ideas that you’ve learned in class into action for larger goal. Some undergraduate researchers  even have their work published in peer-reviewed journals.

Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBiotechnology offers a summer research experience for undergraduates in nano bio.   A criteria for applying to an REU  program is that you have had prior research experience.  Don’t miss your opportunity to learn about this exciting component of your undergraduate academic career.

For more information about the Society of Women Engineers go to http://www.jhu.edu/swe/index.html

For details about  about Johns Hopkins Institute for Nano Biotechnology summer Research Experience for Undergraduates program, go to http://inbt.jhu.edu/education/undergraduate/reu/

Applications for the 2012 summer program will be accepted soon.

Nanobio postdocs offer trusted tips on getting grant money

Photo illustration by Mary Spiro.

Three postdoctoral fellows from Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology will offer a one-hour crash course in how to get those research dollars; July 27, 11 a.m. Krieger 205. Free for Hopkins community.

Funding dollars make the research world go ‘round. Few know that better than postdoctoral fellows, who would be out of work without it. As part of Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology’s last professional development seminar of the summer, three INBT affiliated postdoctoral fellows will offer their sage advice on preparing winning research grants.

Topics to be covered on the basic aspects of grant writing include:

  • knowing when to write a grant
  • identifying funding sources
  • planning a timeline
  • how to structure a competitive proposal
  • do’s and dont’s of grant writing and planning
  • basic science writing tips for conveying ideas clearly and succinctly

This seminar will be led by Eric Balzer, postdoctoral fellow with professor Konstantinos Konstantopoulos (ChemBE); Yanique Rattigan, postdoctoral fellow with professor Anirban Maitra (Oncology/Pathology); and Daniele Gilkes, postdoctoral fellow with professor Denis Wirtz (ChemBE).

For additional information on INBT’s professional development seminar series, contact Ashanti Edwards, INBT’s Academic Program Administrator at Ashanti@jhu.edu.

 

 

 

 

Summer interns join PS-OC labs

Each summer, Johns Hopkins Institute for Nanobiotechnology (INBT) hosts several summer research interns, five of who will conduct research as part of Johns Hopkins Physical Sciences-Oncology Center.

Erin Heim, from University of Florida, will be testing the effects of cell geometry and chemotaxis on cell polarity in the Denis Wirtz lab (Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering). “The goal is to find which of the two is more important to polarity when working against each other,” she said.

Also in the Wirtz lab, Nick Trenton is developing an agarose-based microfluidics chamber that can be used to establish a chemotaxis gradient in 3D cell culture. “We’ll be testing various cell knockdowns in 3D in the presence of a chemokine gradient,” he said.

Rachel Louie from Johns Hopkins, works in the Peter Searson lab (Materials Science and Engineering). She is characterizing the properties of human umbilical vein endothelial cells cultured under different conditions. “We’re testing to see how the amount of growth factors in cell culture medium will affect transendothelial electrical resistance values,” Louie said.

Thea Roper from North Carolina State University works in the Sharon Gerecht lab (Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering). Roper said she will analyze how human embryonic stem cells mature into smooth muscle cells. “To do this, I must determine the pathway by using techniques such as immunofluorescence, RT-PCR, and Western Blot to examine Myocardin, a transcriptional co-activator, Elk-1, a ternary complex factor, PDGF-R, platelet-derived growth factor receptors, and SRF, serum response factors,” she said.

Quinton Smith also works in the Gerecht lab. This is his second year interning at Hopkins. Smith, from University of New Mexico, is fabricating a microfluidic device that recreates hypoxic (low oxygen) conditions. “I’ll study how adult and embryonic stem cells respond to this dynamic environment,” he said.

Read more about INBT’s summer interns at the following link: http://wp.me/p1sSPo-VT

 

Hopkins alumni learn about engineering in oncology

Denis Wirtz directs INBT’s Engineering in Oncology Center. Photo: Mary Spiro

As  part of Johns Hopkins Alumni Weekend 2011, Denis Wirtz, director of the Johns Hopkins Engineering in Oncology Center, gave a talk April 29 on how researchers are using physics and engineering to better understand cancer. Wirtz is the Theophilus H. Smoot Professor in the Whiting School of Engineering Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering.

Wirtz spoke in Mason Hall Auditorium with about 100 alumni in attendance. He showed animations explaining the process of metastasis and concluded his remark with a viewing of the short movie “INBT: An Overview.” The audience seemed engaged and asked several questions following Wirtz’s presentation. The talk was presented for the Class of ’61 alumni.

Johns Hopkins Engineering in Oncology Center is a Physical Sciences-Oncology Center funded by the National Cancer Institute. It was established in 2009.

To see the full gallery of photos from this event, visit this link on the PS-OC  Facebook page.

Mini symposium highlights Johns Hopkins student work in cancer nanotechnology

Maureen Wanjara and Laura Dickinson, Johns Hopkins INBT predoctoral students from Sharon Gerecht’s lab (Photo: Marty Katz)

Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology will host a half-day mini-symposium on Wednesday, March 23 to showcase current research from students affiliated with its Engineering in Oncology Center and Center of Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence. Talks begin at 9 a.m. in Hackerman Hall Auditorium (Room B17) and will conclude by noon.

Students speaking include from the Whiting School of Engineering, predoctoral fellows in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Stephanie Fraley, Laura Dickinson, and Craig Schneider; and postdoctoral fellows Christopher Hale, Jaeho Park, and Eric Balzer. Speaking from Biomedical Engineering will be predoctoral fellow Yi Zhang and undergradute Kelvin Liu; and in Mechanical Engineering postdoctoral fellow Sam Walcott. Also giving presentations are predoctoral fellow Dipankar Pramanik in Pathology at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and John Fini, director of intellectual property for the Homewood campus schools.

Johns Hopkins Engineering in Oncology Center, a Physical Sciences-Oncology Center (PS-OC) funded by a grant from the National Cancer Institute, aims to unravel the physical underpinnings involved in the growth and spread of cancer. Johns Hopkins Center of Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence, also funded by a grant from the NCI, aims to use a multidisciplinary approach to develop nanotechnology-based tools and strategies for comprehensive cancer diagnosis and therapy and to translate those tools to the marketplace.

There is no need to RSVP for the mini-symposium. All Johns Hopkins students, faculty and staff are welcome to attend.

John Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology

Engineering in Oncology Center

Center of Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence

Cells studied in 3-D may reveal novel cancer targets

Stephanie Fraley

Stephanie Fraley, a doctoral student in chemical and biomolecular engineering, was lead author of the study. Photo by Will Kirk/HomewoodPhoto.jhu.edu

Showing movies in 3-D has produced a box-office bonanza in recent months. Could viewing cell behavior in three dimensions lead to important advances in cancer research? A new study led by Johns Hopkins University engineers indicates it may happen. Looking at cells in 3-D, the team members concluded, yields more accurate information that could help develop drugs to prevent cancer’s spread.

“Finding out how cells move and stick to surfaces is critical to our understanding of cancer and other diseases. But most of what we know about these behaviors has been learned in the 2-D environment of Petri dishes,” said Denis Wirtz, director of the Johns Hopkins Engineering in Oncology Center and principal investigator of the study. “Our study demonstrates for the first time that the way cells move inside a three-dimensional environment, such as the human body, is fundamentally different from the behavior we’ve seen in conventional flat lab dishes. It’s both qualitatively and quantitatively different.”

One implication of this discovery is that the results produced by a common high-speed method of screening drugs to prevent cell migration on flat substrates are, at best, misleading, said Wirtz, who also is the Theophilus H. Smoot Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at Johns Hopkins. This is important because cell movement is related to the spread of cancer, Wirtz said. “Our study identified possible targets to dramatically slow down cell invasion in a three-dimensional matrix.”

When cells are grown in two dimensions, Wirtz said, certain proteins help to form long-lived attachments called focal adhesions on surfaces. Under these 2-D conditions, these adhesions can last several seconds to several minutes. The cell also develops a broad, fan-shaped protrusion called a lamella along its leading edges, which helps move it forward. “In 3-D, the shape is completely different,” Wirtz said. “It is more spindlelike with two pointed protrusions at opposite ends. Focal adhesions, if they exist at all, are so tiny and so short-lived they cannot be resolved with microscopy.”

The study’s lead author, Stephanie Fraley, a Johns Hopkins doctoral student in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, said that the shape and mode of movement for cells in 2-D are merely an “artifact of their environment,” which could produce misleading results when testing the effect of different drugs. “It is much more difficult to do 3-D cell culture than it is to do 2-D cell culture,” Fraley said. “Typically, any kind of drug study that you do is conducted in 2D cell cultures before it is carried over into animal models. Sometimes, drug study results don’t resemble the outcomes of clinical studies. This may be one of the keys to understanding why things don’t always match up.”

collagen fibers

Reflection confocal micrograph of collagen fibers of a 3D matrix with cancer cells embedded. Image by Stephanie Fraley/Wirtz Lab

Fraley’s faculty supervisor, Wirtz, suggested that part of the reason for the disconnect could be that even in studies that are called 3-D, the top of the cells are still located above the matrix. “Most of the work has been for cells only partially embedded in a matrix, which we call 2.5-D,” he said. “Our paper shows the fundamental difference between 3-D and 2.5-D: Focal adhesions disappear, and the role of focal adhesion proteins in regulating cell motility becomes different.”

Wirtz added that “because loss of adhesion and enhanced cell movement are hallmarks of cancer,” his team’s findings should radically alter the way cells are cultured for drug studies. For example, the team found that in a 3-D environment, cells possessing the protein zyxin would move in a random way, exploring their local environment. But when the gene for zyxin was disabled, the cells traveled in a rapid and persistent, almost one-dimensional pathway far from their place of origin.

Fraley said such cells might even travel back down the same pathways they had already explored. “It turns out that zyxin is misregulated in many cancers,” Fraley said. Therefore, she added, an understanding of the function of proteins like zyxin in a 3-D cell culture is critical to understanding how cancer spreads, or metastasizes. “Of course tumor growth is important, but what kills most cancer patients is metastasis,” she said.

To study cells in 3-D, the team coated a glass slide with layers of collagen-enriched gel several millimeters thick. Collagen, the most abundant protein in the body, forms a network in the gel of cross-linked fibers similar to the natural extracellular matrix scaffold upon which cells grow in the body. The researchers then mixed cells into the gel before it set. Next, they used an inverted confocal microscope to view from below the cells traveling within the gel matrix. The displacement of tiny beads embedded in the gel was used to show movement of the collagen fibers as the cells extended protrusions in both directions and then pulled inward before releasing one fiber and propelling themselves forward.

Fraley compared the movement of the cells to a person trying to maneuver through an obstacle course crisscrossed with bungee cords. “Cells move by extending one protrusion forward and another backward, contracting inward, and then releasing one of the contacts before releasing the other,” she said. Ultimately, the cell moves in the direction of the contact released last.

When a cell moves along on a 2-D surface, the underside of the cell is in constant contact with a surface, where it can form many large and long-lasting focal adhesions. Cells moving in 3-D environments, however, only make brief contacts with the network of collagen fibers surrounding them–contacts too small to see and too short-lived to even measure, the researchers observed.

“We think the same focal adhesion proteins identified in 2-D situations play a role in 3-D motility, but their role in 3-D is completely different and unknown,” Wirtz said. “There is more we need to discover.”

Fraley said her future research will be focused specifically on the role of mechanosensory proteins like zyxin on motility, as well as how factors such as gel matrix pore size and stiffness affect cell migration in 3-D.

Co-investigators on this research from Washington University in St. Louis were Gregory D. Longmore, a professor of medicine, and his postdoctoral fellow Yunfeng Feng, both of whom are affiliated with the university’s BRIGHT Institute. Longmore and Wirtz lead one of three core projects that are the focus of the Johns Hopkins Engineering in Oncology Center, a National Cancer Institute-funded Physical Sciences in Oncology Center. Additional Johns Hopkins authors, all from the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, were Alfredo Celedon, a recent doctoral recipient; Ranjini Krishnamurthy, a recent bachelor’s degree recipient; and Dong-Hwee Kim, a current doctoral student.

Funding for the research was provided by the National Cancer Institute.  This study, a collaboration with researchers at Washington University in St. Louis, appeared in the June issue of Nature Cell Biology.

Related links:

Johns Hopkins Engineering in Oncology Center

Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering

Watch a related video on YouTube

Story by Mary Spiro

INBT’s Nano-Magic appears at first USA Science and Engineering Festival Expo

The first USA Science & Engineering Festival Expo is set for October 23-24 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., and Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology will be there showcasing some of our research. More than 1,500 interactive exhibits and stage shows are planned.

INBT will present a hands-on exhibit of demonstrations dedicated to self-assembly entitled “Nano-Magic” that will allow visitors of all ages a chance to learn about now atoms, molecules and materials have ways of building structures all by themselves. Graduate students affiliated with INBT training programs will help visitors understand the science. In addition, several of the videos created by INBT’s Animation Studio will be on display on a computer monitor.

Some of the other exhibits include the science behind TRON and other Hollywood movies, baseball, superheroes, Thanksgiving dinner, and NASCAR as well as the mathematics of speed jump roping. There are also 50 stage shows featuring science musicians, comedians, and rock stars. Even the Redskins cheerleaders will be leading a pep rally for science.

Bring the whole family to this free event. Come check out our booth located at Section NM 6, Booth No. 610, along with several other Johns Hopkins affiliated exhibits listed here. Visit the official festival website to view all exhibit and stage shows, download a map of the Expo grounds, and view the entire festival calendar.

Related Link:

INBT Animation Studio