Learning How to Take a Product from Lab to Market

One of the most helpful courses that I’d ever taken as an undergraduate student was a course called, “Engineering Entrepreneurship”. This was an intense course designed to simulate the actual process of developing a startup company based on an original technology. I spent long hours with a team of students working to draw up financial reports for our pseudo company, outlining an operations plan for development and putting together a business proposal at the end. A course like this is so important because many groups in biotechnology, energy, and other industries feel that nanotechnology is on the cusp of being an industry in and of itself if not for a few very impactful ideas.

Ttech-transfer-illohere are many ways for nanotech applications to make it to the marketplace. Indeed, there are various drugs such as Doxil which have been around for years and were “nano” before it became a buzzword.(1)  Nanotechnology has become a part of other industrial processes, giving antimicrobial properties to surfaces or improving microfab processes.  We should look, however, not only to how nanotechnology can be used to supplement existing products or how to reliable existing products as nanotechnology but also how to cultivate a new industry based on nanotechnology.

How exactly can a nanotech industry be created?  I think that is something much too involved to discuss in a single blog post.  What I can suggest is that all engineering students look into taking business courses along with their other requirements.  I believe that if engineers with a background in nanotechnology can become involved in the process of developing startups that then nanotechnology will be as recognized of an industry as biotechnology has become.

1. Doxil Home Page. Accessed 10/24/2013 <http://www.doxil.com>.

By Gregory Wiedman, a graduate student from the Materials Science Department who is altering natural peptides from Bee Honey venom to improve drug delivery.

 

 

Getting my hands dirty in NanoBio lab

As a second year graduate student, classes take up a non-insignificant part of my day. One of the classes that I had the opportunity to take last spring was NanoBio Laboratory. NanoBio lab is clearly a laboratory class, which is always very exciting for an engineer. I enjoy any opportunity to get my hands dirty and really learn some techniques. And that was exactly what we had the opportunity to do.

NanoBio Lab was our chance to go into many of the labs in The Institute for NanoBioTechnology (INBT) and get an idea of some of the techniques that they use and the general area of research of the lab. Some of the techniques that were demonstrated in this course included gold nanoparticles synthesis, transfecting cells with luciferase (the chemical that makes fireflies glow), and a novel method of analyzing images. While not all of the labs necessarily apply to the work that I am doing, many of them have some relevance and could come in handy in the future.

Through this lab, I have learned techniques that could be useful in my research in the future. Not only have I learned useful techniques, it was also an excellent chance to network within other labs. In this course, we had one or two representatives from many of the labs associated with the INBT instruct us and assist us in learning the techniques. This allowed us to form a relationship with at least one member in the represented labs, which will make it easier to reach out to other labs for help learning new procedures and protocols.

I just found out that I’m going to have to attempt to transfect a cell line, which I have never done outside of the NanoBio lab. Just as all laboratory work I know that it will be difficult, and that I’m likely to fail a number of times before I have any success. Through this class, however, I know someone who I can talk to for advice and assistance as I go through this process.

Moriah Knight is a second year PhD student in Peter Searson’s lab studying Materials Science and Engineering.