High schoolers to show off their summer research

Stephanie Keyaka (left) working with Jincy Abraham (Notre Dame) in the Craig Montell Lab. Photo by Mary Spiro.

The Summer Academic Research Experience (SARE) pairs specially selected teens who come from academically disadvantaged homes with university mentors who guide them through a mini research project. The students gain valuable work skills, learn about scientific careers, get tutoring help, practice their writing, gather data for their projects and earn some cash for the future. The group will present their research findings during a poster session at the Johns Hopkins University medical campus on August 20 in the Bodian Room (1830 Building Rm 2-200) from 3:30 to 4:30 p.m.

“This is way better than flipping burgers,” laughed Stephanie Keyaka, as she prepared an image of a Western Blot performed on  Drosophila (fly) eye genes.

Keyaka is one of three high school students who worked in a biological chemistry laboratory  this summer with financial support from Johns Hopkins University Institute for NanoBioTechnology and School of Medicine.

Christopher Miller (right) with his mentor Hoku West-Foyle. Photo by Mary Spiro.

Keyaka, a rising 10th grader from The SEED School of Maryland, will be joined at the poster session by Christopher Miller, also a rising 10th grader from The SEED School of Maryland and Shaolin Holloman, a rising 11th grader at Baltimore Polytechnic Institute who is part of the Boys Hope Girls Hope of Baltimore.

The SEED School of Maryland is a public boarding school that accepts qualified children from across the state entering the 6th grade.  Boys Hope Girls Hope is a privately funded nonprofit that offers students the chance to attend academically challenging public or private schools and the opportunity to live in the Boys Hope or Girls Hope home.

Miller studied the protein myosin in the cell biology laboratory of  associate professor Douglas Robinson. Holloman worked in the cell biology lab of professor Carolyn Machamer on a project that sought to understand why the SARS coronavirus localized in the Golgi apparatus of the cell. Keyaka studied rhodopsin in the eyes of flies the lab of professor Craig Montell.

Shaolin Holloman (left) with professor Carolyn Machamer. Photo by Mary Spiro.

Help celebrate the accomplishments of our summer high school students who participated in the Summer Academic Research Experience. This event is free and open to the entire Hopkins  community. Light refreshments will be served. Students, faculty and mentors will available to discus the projects.

 

 

 

Summer scholars celebrate first high school graduates

Charles Booth and his mentor Yulia Artemenko at the 2011 Boys Hope poster session. Photo: Mary Spiro

To encourage promising high school students to pursue careers in academia and research, Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology and the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine welcome scholars from Baltimore’s Boys Hope Girls Hope (BHGH) to work in university laboratories. From June through August each summer for the past three years, high school students have worked alongside scientists in Johns Hopkins University laboratories producing raw data that supports the research goals of their mentors.

This summer, the university welcomed four BHGH scholars and, at the conclusion of the session, the scholars presented their findings to faculty, students, staff, and members of their families during a poster session held, August 12. The program also celebrated its first two high school graduates.

Matthew Green-Hill has been in the BHGH/INBT program for three summers. He graduated this spring from Archbishop Curley High School and was accepted to The College of William and Mary where he plans to study political science. He worked in the lab of assistant professor Sean Taverna in the department of pharmacology and molecular sciences. Along with his mentor PhD student Tonya Gilbert, Green-Hill presented “Cloning Yng1 to Identify Novel Histone Modification Binding Motifs that may affect Gene Expression” at the poster session.

Dwayne Thomas II worked in the cell biology laboratory of associate professor Douglas Robinson. He and his mentor, PhD student Hoku West-Foyle, conducted research that was presented in the poster “Dictyostelium discoideum myosin-ll, a modular motor.” Thomas has participated in the summer research program for two summers. He graduated from Loyola Blakefield in May and will attend Loyola University Maryland in the fall as a biology/pre-med major.

Working in the biological chemistry laboratory of professor Craig Montell, Durrell Igwe was mentored by postdoctoral fellow Marquis Walker and presented the poster “Reduced Immune Response in Drosophila Lysosomal Storage Disease Model.” This is also Igwe’s second year in the program, and he will graduate from Archbishop Curley High School in the spring of 2012.

One of the newest BHGH scholars is Charles Booth, who worked with postdoctoral fellow Yulia Artemenko in the cell biology lab of professor Peter Devreotes. He presented the poster “Analysis of the Functional Redundancy Between Dictyostelium KrsB and Its Mammalian Homolog Mstl.” Booth attends Calvert Hall and will be a junior this fall.

The BHGH program is geared toward students with academic potential but who lack the resources or stability to achieve their full potential. Some of those who have participated in the program may have at one time missed weeks of school in the past. Others have even been homeless. Students voluntarily apply to the nonprofit program to access services such as a stable home, tutoring, and counseling. Scholars have the opportunity to live together in an adult-supervised house in Baltimore and attend local private schools. Both boys and girls participate in the program and next year, Robinson said he hopes Hopkins will attract some of the young women interested in science and medicine to work in sponsored laboratories.

Additional photos on our Facebook Page.

Boys Hope Girls Hope Baltimore

Story by Mary Spiro

 

 

 

 

 

INBT summer scholars “Extreme Makeover: Home Edition” Airs Sept. 26

 

From left, Matthew Green-Hill, Dwayne Thomas II, Donte Jones, Durrell Igwe. (Photo by Mary Spiro/INBT)

Swirling test tubes and swinging hammers set the stage for four talented Baltimore city high school students whose summer included working in Johns Hopkins University medical research laboratories and helping build a new home for some of their fellow scholars. The young men, all part of Baltimore’s Boys Hope/Girls Hope program, were supported equally by Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology (INBT) and the School of Medicine to gain experience conducting research. But the producers of ABC’s “Extreme Makeover: Home Edition” television show also put the boys (and a bunch of other folks) to work to construct a spacious home for the young women of Girls Hope. (The episode featuring the Boys Hope Girls Hope home build airs this Sunday, Sept 26 at 7 p.m. as the show’s 2-hour season premier. See video in links below.)

According to the organization’s website, Boys Hope/Girls Hope is a “privately funded, non-profit multi-denominational organization that provides at-risk children with a stable home, positive parenting, high quality education, and the support needed to reach their full potential.” In the summer of 2009, INBT hosted two students to work in labs at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. This summer INBT hosted four Boys Hope Girls Hope scholars.

Matthew Green-Hill, 18, a junior at Archbishop Curley High School and Donte Jones, 17, a sophomore at Archbishop Curley High School returned this summer and were joined by Dwayne Thomas, 16, a junior at Loyola Blakefield and Durrell Igwe, 16, a sophomore at Archbishop Curley. (Other students participate in Boys Hope Girls Hope, but only four scholars had summer jobs at Johns Hopkins.)

 

Dwayne Thomas II shows off his summer research efforts. (Photo by Christie Johnson/INBT)

Doug Robinson, associate professor of cell biology at the School of Medicine spear-headed the effort to bring Boys Hope Girls Hope scholars to Johns Hopkins through INBT. Each scholar was paired with a graduate student or postdoctoral fellow in their host labs to ensure that they were actively engaged in an aspect of a research. “The goal of this program was to provide our scholars with a summer experience that was challenging, enriching, and personally rewarding,” Robinson said. “Additionally, the students participated in a class three mornings a week where they worked on writing, reading, and mathematics skills.”

The summer experience concluded with a poster session where the scholars showed off what they had done with family, friends, other faculty members and staff. For example, Dwayne Thomas II worked with postdoctoral fellow Alexandra Surcel in Cell Biology in Robinson’s lab to conduct research on cytokinesis in the organism Dictyostelium.

“My summer experience was very important to me on so many levels,” Thomas said. “The quality education I received this summer was outstanding because I learned so much it will help next year in school. I feel like this has really prepared me for college in the near future and also for my dream of becoming a medical doctor. During the summer program, it taught me a lot about professionalism such the importance of arriving at work on time. I know that this experience has made me strive even harder because not many people receive the same type of opportunities I do.”

Donte Jones worked on the problem of malaria in the laboratory of Caren Meyers, assistant professor in the Department of Pharmacology and Molecular Sciences at the School of Medicine. Durrell Igwe spent his summer in the neuroscience laboratory of Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator Alex Kolodkin in the department of neuroscience. Matthew Green-Hill participated in neurodegenerative disease research in the laboratory of Craig Montell, professor of biological chemistry at the School of Medicine.

A half dozen young women also study through Girls Hope, but unlike their male counterparts, the girls had no home where they could live with their adult mentors, only a parcel of land in the Hamilton section of Baltimore. Boys Hope/Girls Hope is completely voluntary and the organization does not serve as a legal guardian to the students, but participants have the option of living in the group house or at home with their own families. Many choose to live with their classmates in the group house.

The Boys Hope scholars wanted to help the Girls Hope scholars get their home built as soon as possible. So the boys sent a video requesting that the makers of the television Extreme Makeover: Home Edition to construct a house for the girls before the start of the next school year. The plea worked and before long, several city blocks along Fleetwood Ave. were cordoned off and filled with construction equipment and workers. The 11,000 square ft. home was built in nine short days, suffering a brief setback due to severe rainstorms. Look for more photos of the Girls Hope Home on the INBT website after the television reveal.

Related Links

Boys Hope/Girls Hope Baltimore

ABC TV Extreme Makeover: Home Edition

Girls Hope of Baltimore Gets an Amazing Gift from Extreme Makeover

Story by Mary Spiro