Interning in INBT’s animation studio

Students from the Maryland Institute College of Art, aka MICA, have been interning at the Johns Hopkins Institute for NanobioTechnology’s Animation Studios pretty much since the studio came into existence in 2007. Studio director and INBT web guru Martin Rietveld organizes the student internships each semester and every summer.

Anny Lai.

Anny Lai.

Most evenings, MICA graphic design major Anny Lai can be found in the INBT animation computer lab working on animating the process of stem cell based tissue regeneration. She has blogged about her experience here.

For more information about internships with INBT, which are open to JHU students, MICA students and others training in the arts, go to this link. Programs used in the animation studio include Cinema 4D, AfterEffects and Adobe Flash.

Even students without training or a background in the arts are welcome to take Martin’s independent study course in animation. Students in engineering and the basic sciences have created smaller animation projects that they use in academic presentations or have submitted to peer-reviewed journals for publication.

Contact Martin at rietveld@jhu.edu for more information.

Collagen video scores high in magazines reader’s choice vote

Screen capture from INBT’s video on collagen mimetic peptides.

The Scientist magazine has announced its annual Multimedia Awards—the Labbys—and Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology’s video on collagen mimetic peptides has been selected as a finalist. According to the voting, we are a strong second in the race. It appears voting is continuing well past the original June 30 deadline. So keep voting!

Help choose us as the top science video by going to this website (http://the-scientist.com/2011/06/15/2011-labby-video-finalists/#vote)  and selecting “Mimicking Collagen.” The video features Michael Yu, associate professor of materials science and engineering and some fantastic animations and illustration from INBT’s Animation studio. Animations in the video were created by Ella McCrea, a graduate from the Maryland Institute College of Art, and Nathan Weiss, a masters graduate from Johns Hopkins University.

Winners of the reader’s choice will be announced in the magazine and online in September. Top picks will also be chosen by The Scientist’s panel of judges, which includes the father of the infographic Nigel Holmes, Kirsten Sanford of the Science Channel (aka Dr. KiKi), Jeffrey Segall of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City, and David Kirby of the University of Manchester.

You can only vote once, so share this link with your friends.

 

 

Come to the NanoBio Film Festival 11 a.m., 6/29 in Krieger 205

Charli Dvoracek storyboarding a video. Photo by Mary Spiro

Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology (INBT) hosts the NanoBio Film Festival on June 29, 11 a.m. in Krieger 205. See the world premiere of three short videos made by members of INBT’s course on science communications. Free for Hopkins community.

Videos featured in this film festival describe the current research of students working in INBT affiliated laboratories. Students in the course learn how to communicate their work in nontechnical terms for general audiences. They work in teams to write, direct, film and produce the videos within a two-week time frame. The producers will be on hand to describe their experience making the videos and to answer questions.

The INBT film festival is part of the institute’s free professional development seminar series. Topics are geared toward undergraduate and graduate students.

Future seminars include:

  • July 13: Adam Steel, PhD, Director of Systems Engineering at Becton Dickinson, will discuss medical device development. Dr. Steel joined BD in 2005. Previously he was vice president of research and development at MetriGenix. He earned his PhD in analytical chemistry at the University of Maryland College Park and undergraduate degrees in chemistry and mathematics from Gettysburg College. He completed a postdoctoral fellowship in medical device development at the National Institutes of Standards and Technology.
  • July 27: Grant submission process and how to obtain funding; a roundtable discussion with INBT affiliated postdoctoral students.

For additional information on INBT’s professional development seminar series, contact Ashanti Edwards, INBT’s Academic Program Administrator at Ashanti@jhu.edu.

 

 

Lights! Camera! Science!

 

INBT Web Director Martin Rietveld works on protocol video with PhD student Yu-Ja Huang. (Photo:MSpiro)

Everything about movie making seems so glamorous. From beautiful stars to special effects, making films might appear magical. But actually, when you break it down, shooting a film is not unlike performing experiments in a lab. And, just as reading the script would be far less entertaining as seeing a film, reading a protocol might be confusing until the steps were performed in real life.

That’s the philosophy behind a new effort at Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology: produce short films describing recently published research and the protocols that go with them. The movies are produced collaboratively with INBT’s science writer Mary Spiro, INBT’s Animation Studio director Martin Rietveld, and the scientists and engineers involved.

The INBT Animation Studio already has several research-oriented films to its credit. The animation skills of Rietveld and his student crew have taken us inside a lipid bilayer and carried us along a fiber of collagen. INBT also has produced several video news releases using the talent of students in the annual science communication course.

Recently, however, INBT produced its first film describing a protocol from Nature Methods. Investigators Bridget Wildt, a PhD in materials science and engineering, Peter Searson, Reynolds Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, and Denis Wirtz, Smoot Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, served as technical consultants for the production. The research was part of Johns Hopkins Engineering in Oncology Center, of which Wirtz is the director.

Materials science and engineering PhD candidate Yu-Ja Huang performs each step in assembling the Hopkins team’s device and demonstrates how to conduct programmed cell detachment experiments. “Studying cell detachment at the subcellular level is critical to understanding the way cancer cells metastasize,” Searson said. “Development of scientific methods to study cell detachment may guide us to prevent, limit or slow down the deadly spreading of cancer cells.”

Using a draft script developed by Wildt and Searson, Spiro simplified the text further for narrator, materials science and engineering PhD candidate Andrew Wong. Rietveld recorded Huang as he performed the protocol and refined the script further during filming. Viewing the final cut, Wong was able to read the script in a conversational and friendly tone.

You can watch the version of this new protocol video on INBT’s YouTube channel. The film may never earn an Academy Award, but we hope it will help specialists, and even the general public, to understand this unusual and complex procedure.

Related Links:

Check our INBT’s channel on YouTube.

Engineering in Oncology Center

Story by Mary Spiro

INBT students to teach about self assembly during national science expo

USA Science and Engineering Festival, Oct 23-24

Predoctoral students, faculty and staff affiliated with INBT, including students in INBT’s National Science Foundation funded IGERT program, will help demonstrate the principles of self-assembly to children and adults alike. Participants at the INBT booth will be able to see at the macro scale what happens when materials of various shapes and sizes assemble into more complex structures at the nanoscale. Through a variety of hands-on experiments and by watching a variety of movies and animations about self assembly produced by the INBT Animation Studio, the students hope to be able to share their expertise in science and engineering with the general public.

During the two-day expo, USA Science and Engineering Festival organizers anticipate at least 750 exhibits from more than 350 of the nation’s leading science and engineering organizations including colleges and universities, corporations, federal agencies, museums and science centers, and professional engineering and science societies. Topics represented range from aerospace, green energy, medicine, biotechnology, climatology to robotics, nanotechnology, botany, neuroscience, genetics, and more.

The USA Science & Engineering Festival is the result of the highly successful inaugural San Diego Science FestivalSM held in April 2009 and both are the brainchild of life science and high technology entrepreneur Larry Bock. The festival is hosted by Lockheed Martin and sponsors include Life Technologies Foundation, Clean Technology and Sustainability Industries Organization (CTSI), Larry and Diane Bock, ResMed Foundation, Farrell Family Foundation, Alexandria Real Estate Equities, Northrop Grumman Corporation, Agilent Technologies, Amgen, Celgene Corporation, The Dow Chemical Company, National Institutes of Health, Illumina, You Can Do the Rubik’s Cube, Vertex Pharmaceuticals Inc., Genentech Inc., MedImmune, Sandia National Laboratories, Project Lead The Way (PLTW), K&L Gates, NuVasive Inc., FEI Company, Case Western Reserve University, Silicon Valley Bank, Bechtel Corporation, SpaceX and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. Media partners include Popular Science and Science Illustrated, New Scientist, EE Times Group, SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN, POPULAR MECHANICS, Forbes Wolfe Emerging Tech Report, FAMILY Magazine and SciVee, Inc.

Additional Information:

Preview of the types of exhibits planned for the National Expo and view a short video of what happened in San Diego here.

For a complete list of sponsors, partners and exhibitors, click here.

Animator, scientist partner to illustrate cover of Advanced Materials

AM_3_U1resizeThe cover of the January 19, 2010 issue of the journal Advanced Materials features a photo illustration executed by Martin Rietveld, web director and animator at Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology. Rietveld’s work illustrates an article about chemomechanical actuators—grippers that open and close like a hand in response to chemical reactions. The paper is based on the research of lead author, doctoral student Jatinder Randhawa in the laboratory of David Gracias, associate professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering and faculty affiliate of the Institute for Nanobiotechnology. Randhawa conceptualized the illustration of his research for the journal cover.

Says Gracias, “Chemomechanical actuation is intellectually appealing since it is widely observed in nature, but chemomechanical actuation is relatively unexplored in human engineering where the dominant strategy to actuate structures is based on electromechanical actuation (i.e. with electrical signals). Here, microstructures open and close reversibly in response to chemical surface oxidation and reduction without the need for any wires or batteries.”

Related links:

Chemomechanical Actuators: Reversible Actuation of Microstructures by Surface-Chemical Modification of Thin-Film Bilayers. Jatinder S. Randhawa, Michael D. Keung, Pawan Tyagi, David H. Gracias.

Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology Animation Studio

David Gracias INBT Faculty Profile