Drazer wins NSF Career Award

German Drazer

German Drazer (Photo: Will Kirk)

German Drazer, assistant professor in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering and affiliated faculty member of Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology was recently named a recipient of the National Science Foundation Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) awards, given in recognition of a young scientist’s commitment to research and education. Drazer was given the award for “Deterministic and Stochastic Transport of Suspended Particles in Periodic Systems: Fundamentals and Applications in Separation Science.” The grant will support his investigations into the transport phenomena that arise in the motion of suspended particles in spatially periodic systems, and the translation of these phenomena into new principles for the manipulation of suspended particles in fluidic devices.

Read more about the work in the Drazer Lab here.

INBT researchers use LEGO to study what happens inside lab-on-a-chip devices

Princeton physicist to discuss physics of cancer cell resistance

Physics professor Robert Austin, right, and graduate ¬student Guillaume Lambert observe prostate cancer cells growing on chips of silicon and silicon-based plastic. (Princeton Office of Communications)

The fact that cancer cells frequently re-emerge after initial therapeutic attempts has dogged the efforts of oncologists to save patients’ lives for decades. According to Princeton physicist, Robert H. Austin, cancer cell resistance is primarily a biological reaction to stress and “one of the great unsolved, and deadly, problems in oncology.”

On Thursday, February 4, Austin will discuss, “The Physics of Cancer,” during a 3 p.m. joint colloquium hosted by Johns Hopkins University departments of Physics and Astronomy and Biophysics in the Schafler auditorium of the Bloomberg Center on the Homewood campus. The talk is free and open to the public.

Austin is principal investigator for Princeton’s Physical Science-Oncology Center and a trans-network partner with Johns Hopkins Engineering in Oncology Center, both of which are National Cancer Institute funded organizations.

Austin will address the general principles of physics, ecology, and biology and why recurrence of resistant cancer cells seems to be a universal phenomenon in cancer. He says that “evolution in small, stressed habitats is key to the rapid and inevitable re-emergence of resistance of cancer cells” (and) “that modern techniques of physical probes, genomics, proteomics and nanotechnology will allow us to analyze the evolutionary path of these emergent resistant cells.”

Related Links

Johns Hopkins Engineering in Oncology Center

Flyer for  Prof. Austin’s colloquium

Physical Sciences in Oncology Centers of the National Cancer Institute

Environmental, health impacts of engineered nanomaterials theme of INBT’s annual symposium

By 2015, the National Science Foundation reports that the nanotechnology industry could be worth as much as $1 trillion. Nanomaterials have many beneficial applications for industry, medicine and basic scientific research. However, because nanomaterials are just a few atoms in size, they also may pose potential risks for human health and the environment.

Cross-sectional autoradiograms of rodent brains showing (A) control physiological state; and (B) and (C) showing distribution of brain injury from an injected neurotoxicant. Red areas indicate the highest concentrations of a biomarker that identifies brain areas that are damaged by the neurotoxicant. (Guilarte Lab/JHU)

Cross-sectional autoradiograms of rodent brains showing (A) control physiological state; and (B) and (C) showing distribution of brain injury from an injected neurotoxicant. Red areas indicate the highest concentrations of a biomarker that identifies brain areas that are damaged by the neurotoxicant. (Guilarte Lab/JHU)

To increase awareness of Hopkins’ research in this emerging area of investigation, the theme for the fourth annual symposium hosted by Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology (INBT) will be environmental and health impacts of engineered nanomaterials. INBT’s symposium will be held Thursday, April 29, from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the university’s Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore, Md.

Morning talks in Sheldon Hall by eight Hopkins faculty experts will discuss neurotoxicity, exposure assessment, manufacture and characterization of nanomaterials, policy implications and many other topics. In the afternoon, a poster session will be held in Feinstone Hall featuring nanobiotechnology research from across the university’s divisions.

INBT is seeking corporate sponsorships for the symposium. Interested parties should contact Thomas Fekete, INBT’s director of corporate partnerships at tmfeke@jhu.edu or 410-516-8891.

Media inquiries should be directed to Mary Spiro, INBT’s science writer and media relations director, at mspiro@jhu.edu or 410-516-4802.

A call for posters announcement will be made at a later date.

More:

INBT, EOC directors named AAAS 2009 Fellows

The Johns Hopkins Whiting School of Engineering faculty members who direct the Institute for NanoBioTechnology and Engineering in Oncology Center both have been awarded the distinction of AAAS Fellow. Election as a Fellow is an honor bestowed upon AAAS members by their peers.

Peter Searson, INBT director. Photo by Will Kirk/JHU

Peter Searson, INBT director. Photo by Will Kirk/JHU

Denis Wirtz, EOC director. Photo by Will Kirk/JHU

Denis Wirtz, EOC director. Photo by Will Kirk/JHU

Peter C. Searson, the Joseph R. and Lynn C. Reynolds Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, was named for distinguished contributions to the field of surface chemistry and nanoscience. His research interests include surface and molecular engineering, and semiconductor quantum dots.

Searson directs the interdivisional Institute for NanoBioTechnology launched in May 2006, which brings together researchers from medicine, engineering, the sciences, and public health to create new knowledge and develop new technologies to revolutionize health care and medicine. INBT currently has more than 190 affiliated faculty members. Searson has secondary appointments in the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences Department of Physics and Astronomy and the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine Department of Oncology.

Denis Wirtz, the Theophilus H. Smoot Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, was elected for his contributions to cell micromechanics and cell adhesion. He also was distinguished for his development and application for particle tracking methods to probe the micromechanical properties of living cells in normal conditions and disease state. Wirtz studies the biophysical properties of healthy and diseased cells, including interactions between adjacent cells and the role of cellular architecture on nuclear shape and gene expression.

Wirtz directs the newly formed Johns Hopkins Engineering in Oncology Center. The EOC is a Physical Sciences in Oncology program center of the National Cancer Institute launched in October 2009 with a $14.8 million grant from the National Institutes of Health. EOC brings together experts in cancer biology, molecular and cellular biophysics, applied mathematics, materials science, and physics to study and model cellular mobility and the assorted biophysical forces involved in the spread of cancer. Wirtz also serves as co-director of the Institute for NanoBioTechnology and has a joint appointment in the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine Department of Oncology.

A total of seven Johns Hopkins faculty members were elected to AAAS this year. Read about all of them in a Johns Hopkins University press release listed in the links below.

This year 531 members have been awarded this honor by AAAS because of their scientifically or socially distinguished efforts to advance science or its applications. New Fellows will be presented with an official certificate and a gold and blue (representing science and engineering, respectively) rosette pin on Feb. 20 at the AAAS Fellows Forum during the 2010 AAAS Annual Meeting in San Diego.  AAAS Fellows were announced in the AAAS News & Notes section of the journal Science on Dec. 18,  2009.

Story by Mary Spiro with materials provided by AAAS.

Seven Johns Hopkins Researchers Named 2009 AAAS Fellows

Searson Group Lab page

Wirtz Group Lab page

Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology

Whiting School of Engineering

A Perinuclear Actin Cap Regulates Shape

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Nano education website features INBT mission, programs

The website TryNano.org now features a comprehensive article on Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology  (INBT) and its mission, programs and outreach.

Visit INBT's profile on TryNano.org.

Visit INBT’s profile on TryNano.org.

The TryNano.org website contains feature articles, links, information boxes, videos, and interviews with professionals focused on research and applications of matter at the nanoscale. Generally, the nanoscale is considered to be dimensions from 1 to 100 nanometers, with 1 nm equal to 10-9m. This site strives to a one-stop resource for students, parents, educators and professionals seeking information about nanoscience and nanotechnology. Trynano.org is sponsored by IBM, IEEE and TryScience.

To check out INBT’s profile on TryNano.org, click here.

Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology updates now on Twitter

Follow INBT on Twitter

For the most up-to-the-minute news on what is happening at Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology (INBT) follow us on Twitter. INBT’s science writer, Mary Spiro, will be tweeting the latest information about the institute’s research, educational programs, newest affiliated faulty members, workshops and events. Follow us at @INBT_JHU or visit the INBT Twitter page.

Date change for final professional development seminar talk: Matthew J. Lesho

The talk “Life after graduate school: Or lessons learned after 15 years in industry” by Matthew J. Lesho has been rescheduled to Tuesday July 28 at 11 a.m. in Room B17 CSEB.

For more details visit http://inbt.jhu.edu/life-after-graduate-school-or-lessons-learned-after-15-years-in-industry/2009/07/09

Life after graduate school: Or lessons learned after 15 years in industry

Matthew Lesho

Matthew Lesho

Update – this talk has been rescheduled to Tuesday July 28 at 11 a.m. in 110 Maryland Hall.

Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology presents Matthew J. Lesho, PhD, Biomedical Engineer with Northrop Grumman Electronic Systems for the final Professional Development Seminar for this summer. His talk, “Life after graduate school: Or lessons learned after 15 years in industry,” will be held July 22 Tuesday July 28 at 11 a.m. in 110 Maryland Hall Room B17 CSEB. This seminar is free and open to students, faculty, and staff.

Ever wonder what it might be like to work in industry for a small medical device start-up company or a large defense contractor? Learn from an expert with nearly 15 years in industry. Lesho will lead an interactive discussion that will highlight the similarities and differences of working in industry as compared to a career in academia. Lesho also will ask the audience to share their perceptions about what they think life will be like after graduation. This seminar provides some real world examples of product and technology development in the industrial environment to help students studying science and engineering gain some perspective on how their academic degrees could be applied to current medical, the military, or homeland defense challenges.

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INBT Presents Professional Development Seminars

Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology (INBT) will host four professional development seminars for scientists and engineers this summer. These seminars aim to expand student’s knowledge of issues and ideas relevant to but outside of the laboratory and classroom experience. Topics this summer will include intellectual property, science journalism, and more. Talks will be held June 10, June 24, July 8, and July 22 at 11 a.m. in Maryland Hall 110. Please RSVP to Ashanti Edwards, aedwards@jhu.edu to attend.

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Charles Day, second speaker at the 2009 INBT Professional Development Seminars

Charles Day, second speaker at the 2009 INBT Professional Development Seminars.

June 24:

“From tip to tale: How science news is made“

Charles Day, senior editor Physics Today

Day earned a PhD in astronomy from the University of Cambridge. After a postdoctoral position at Japan’s Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, he worked for six years at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. He now writes for and edits the Search and Discovery Department for Physics Today, the flagship publication of The American Institute of Physics and most influential and closely followed physics magazine in the world.

July speakers to be announced. Check back here for more info.

Past speakers:

June 10:

“The Role of Intellectual Property in Technology Commercialization and Academic Research.”

John N. Fini, director of intellectual property, Krieger School of Arts and Sciences, Whiting School of Engineering

Fini brings a wealth of experience in technology transfer and technology commercialization and in the entrepreneurial environment. He works closely with Johns Hopkins Technology Transfer with the aim of promoting the Homewood campus as a technology powerhouse.