LinkedIn Advice from the experts

INBT undergraduates attended a session, giving expert advice on how to build an effective profile and how to use LinkedIn for visibility, networking, and finding your next step.  The presenter discusses the latest features, and find connections you didn’t even know about. The presenter is Donna Vogel, MD, PhD, Professional Development Office (JHMI) Director and LinkedIn member since 2003.

 

In celebration of data

The Celebration of Data Symposium features a keynote talk by Denis Wirtz, Vice Provost for Research, Theophilus Halley Smoot Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering and associate director of INBT. Speakers will be discussing how they have been using and leveraging data in their new lives. Topics will vary widely, from academic science, to the biotech industry, to work in the private and government sectors. The symposium will be held Friday, June 20 in Hackerman Hall B-17 (basement auditorium) from 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. on the Homewood campus. This event is free and open to the Hopkins community.

Former PhD Shyam Khatau with Dens Wirtz. Photo by Will Kirk

Former PhD Shyam Khatau (left) with Dens Wirtz. Photo by Will Kirk

Agenda

  • 9:00 – 9:10 am Andrew Douglas Vice Dean for Faculty, WSE, Opening Remarks
  • 9:10 – 9:30 am Soichiro Yamada, PhD Associate Professor, UC Davis, To adhere or not to adhere: self-contact elimination by membrane fusion
  • 9:30 – 9:50 am Osi Esue, PhD, MBA Strategy Manager, Genentech, From single cells to the clinic: the roadmap of drug discovery and development
  • 9:50 – 10:10 am Daniele Gilkes, PhD, Assistant Research Professor, JHU Hypoxia and the ECM: drivers of tumor metastasis
  • 10:10 – 10:30 am Shyam Khatau, PhD, Senior Consultant, Navigant The secret life of a consultant
  • 10:30 – 11:00 am Coffee Break
  • 11:00 – 11:20 am Jerry S.H. Lee, PhD Health Sciences Director, NCI, Advancing Convergence and Innovation in Cancer Research
  • 11:20 – 11:40 am Tom Kole, MD, PhD Radiation Oncology Resident, Georgetown, Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy of Prostate Adenocarcinoma
  • 11:40 – 12 noon Owen McCarty, PhD Associate Professor, OHSU, Cytoskeletal remodeling of blood cells
  • 12 noon – 1 pm Lunch
  • 1:00 – 1:20 pm Steph Fraley, PhD BWF CASI Fellow, JHU, Digital Nucleic Acid Melting Analysis for Rapid Infectious Disease Diagnostics
  • 1:20 – 1:40 pm Brian Daniels, PhD Program Manager, Draper Laboratory, Design, development, and deployment
  • 1:40 – 2:00 pm Michelle Dawson, PhD Assistant Professor, Georgia Tech, Mechanosensitivity and the Rho/ROCK pathway
  • 2:00 – 2:20 pm Eva Lai, PhD Innovation Officer, JHU, Translational medicine in the DoD
  • 2:20 – 2:40 pm Coffee Break
  • 2:40 – 3:00 pm Konstantinos Konstantopoulos, PhD Professor and Chair, Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, JHU, The physical biology of cancer metastasis
  • 3:00 – 3:45 pm Denis Wirtz, PhD VP of Research, TH Smoot Professor of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, Oncology and Pathology, JHU, The measurement science of cell migration
  • 3:45 Owen McCarty, PhD Associate Professor, OHSU, Closing Remarks

 

 

INBT Seminar: the graduate school admissions process

The next professional development seminar hosted by Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology will be held Wednesday, June 18 at 10:30 a.m. in the Schaffer 3 Auditorium. The speaker is Maya Suraj, new Director of Graduate Admissions and Enrollment for Arts & Sciences and Engineering at the Homewood campus.

Maya Suraj

Maya Suraj

Prior to Hopkins, she was at the Illinois Institute of Technology, where she focused on streamlining the graduate process. This included making the graduate office proficient in credential evaluation, redesigning workflows, integrating technology and developing recruitment plans. Suraj will talk to the students about the graduate admissions process from cradle to grave, best practices and tips. A Q&A will follow.

This seminar is free and open to the Hopkins community, but an RSVP is required to Danielle Tiggle at dtiggle1@jhu.edu.

Seminar on bioinspired micropatterned surfaces

The Hopkins Extreme Materials Institute hosts the talk, “Bioinspired Micropatterned Surfaces with Switchable Functionality” with speaker Eduard Arzt, Scientific Director of the Leibniz Institute for New Materials and Department of Materials Science, Saarland University (Germany) on Wednesday, June 18 at 11 a.m. in B17 Hackerman Hall.

Eduard Arzt

Eduard Arzt

Abstract: New surfaces and coatings can drastically improve the properties and applicability of materials. At INM, we develop  and investigate new micro- and nanopatterned surfaces for diverse functionalities: low friction, adhesion, corrosion protection, anti-reflection, electric storage and combinations of these. Such surfaces either exhibit new chemistries or new topographies, sometimes on different hierarchical levels. This talk will first summarize some of our developments by bridging the scientific principles with existing or emerging applications. It will then focus on micropatterning of surfaces for novel adhesive functionalities: the exploitation of judiciously designed surface protrusions, “fibrils” and other features at the micron scale – as insects, spiders and geckos – to create fundamentally new degrees of freedom for mechanical and other surface functions. Our extensive research in this area has recently led to the following results: i)design of active surfaces that exploit a transition from an adhesive to non-adhesive state, ii) first implementation in active pick-and-place systems, and iii) our recent developments in producing functional surfaces for interaction with soft materials, such as human skin. Our current emphasis is on controlling adhesion and friction, which is of great potential interest in microfabrication, construction industry, and sports equipment. Such developments require modeling and simulation activities which help understand the micromechanics of patterned adhesion and identify optimum parameters in a vast parameter space.

This talk is free and open to the Hopkins community. Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBiotechnology supports this event.

HEMI

INM

 

 

 

 

Apply now for Certificate of Advanced Studies in Nanobiotechnology

Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology is recruiting for the fall and spring cohorts for our graduate training program. Doctoral students who successfully complete the program will receive a Certificate of Advanced Studies in Nanobiotechnology. Students already admitted to graduate programs in most science and engineering disciplines are invited to apply.

Read a full description of the program in this certificate flyer. Screen Shot 2014-06-03 at 3.30.11 PM

If accepted, INBT training program students participate in:

  • weekly journal clubs and tutorials
  • additional education through an engineering course and dvanced cell biology course
  • the intersession Nanobio Bootcamp
  • a science communications course

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact Ashanti Edwards directly at Ashanti@jhu.edu or reach out to INBT directors Peter Searson or Denis Wirtz. We look forward to reviewing the files of prospective applicants for the program.

For more information on our graduate programs visit this link.

For media inquires regarding Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology or its programs, centers or faculty experts, contact Mary Spiro, Media Relations Director, at mspiro@jhu.edu or 410-516-4802.

 

INBT seminar focuses on grad school process

inbt-abstractJohns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnolgy’s first professional development seminar of the summer will be held June 4 at 10:30 a.m. in Schaffer 3 (downstairs). This week we will have a graduate panel give three different perspectives of the graduate school process. The panel consists of current PhD students and recent graduates of INBT laboratories, all from the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering.

Speakers include:

Quinton Smith was a previous REU (twice!) and works in Sharon Gerecht lab. He will give his perspective of how you can transitions from being an REU to a graduate student.

Luisa Russell can give a general perspective on graduate school, the admissions process, choosing a lab, etc. She is a second-year PhD candidate in the materials science department working on hybrid multifunctional nanoparticles in Peter Searson’s research group.

Allison Chambliss recently defended her PhD and can give the full perspective of being a graduate student, research, defending and looking for a job. She was part of the Denis Wirtz laboratory.

This event is free and open to the Hopkins community.

 

 

Applications now being accepted for Global Engineering Innovation

THE DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS HAS BEEN EXTENDED TO NOON ON JUNE 10.

The Global Engineering Innovation (GEI) program was started by Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology (INBT) to give Hopkins-trained engineers the chance to to solve the community problems of developing nations. Now it it’s third year, INBT seeks new applicants for the next round of projects.

“As a part of GEI, I was able to collaborate with the staff of the Indonesian non-profit, Kopernik – some of the coolest, most passionate people I have ever met,” said Sakina Girnary, biomedical engineering (Class of 2015). “The interactions I had with the warm and friendly locals felt truly genuine, and the work we carried out was the most fulfilling I have ever accomplished in my life”

DSCF9434-webINBT has obtained university funding to annually support two engineering mission teams composed of two to four students at a variety of international host sites. Teams will have two mentors: one from the Johns Hopkins faculty and one from the host site. Together, they will develop budgets, timelines and project plans to address a problem identified at a host location.

Once teams, mentors and challenges are defined, the team or team leader will travel to site to further evaluate the challenge and design constraints. Returning to Baltimore, the teams will meet to further research the challenge and brainstorm potential solutions. The Global Engineering Innovation program gives Johns Hopkins’ graduate students and select undergraduates an opportunity to investigate and tackle engineering challenges in the developing world. The JHU School for Advanced International Studies (SAIS) will be consulted so that students will be aware of the social and political atmosphere that may impact utilization and potential distribution of the engineering solutions.

Applications are now being accepted for Global Engineering Innovation projects designed to give Johns Hopkins’ graduate students and select undergraduates an opportunity to investigate and tackle engineering challenges in the developing world. CIMG1403-webJohns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology has funding for five additional students to join a team working on a Fish Dryer and Rice Harvesting machine for Rural East Java, Indonesia. The team is mentored by Professor Jennifer Elisseeff and partnering with Kopernik, a non-profit that balances a philanthropic and business approach to distributing technology in last-mile communities around the world. The team will have to build prototypes to be tested at the end of this summer in Indonesia.

To be eligible to apply, undergraduate and graduate students should be public health or engineering majors (other majors will be considered if a fit is evident based on application material). Students available this summer are particularly encouraged to apply.

To apply for this unique opportunity, go to this link for application instructions and forms. After the new team is defined, they will immediately start contributing in the development of the prototype to be tested this summer. If the test is successful, potential avenues of translation will be investigated with advisory board members with relevant experience.

If you have additional questions, please contact Makesi Paul (mpaul18@jhu.edu), Yunuscan Sevimli (yunuscan.sevimli@jhu.edu) or Sakina Girnary (sakinagirnary@gmail.com), for more information on the application process.

For media inquires regarding Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology or its programs, centers or faculty experts, contact Mary Spiro, Media Relations Director, at mspiro@jhu.edu or 410-516-4802.

Congratulations to INBT symposium poster prize winners

Five winners took home prizes during the poster session held at the annual symposium hosted by Johns Hopkins Institute for Nanobiotechnology May 2 at the School of Medicine. The theme of the symposium was Stem Cell Science and Engineeering: State of the Art. Fifty-six posters were presented from disciplines across the university and were judged by faculty and industry experts. First, second and third place winners won Nikon cameras and honorable mentions won digital frame key chains.

DSC_0186

From left, Rebecca Schulman, Thomas Joseph, Kirsten Crapnell, Lauren Woodard, Jane Chisholm, Tao Yu, and Robert Ivkov. (Photo by Yi-An Lin)

The winners and poster titles included:

First Place:

Lauren Woodard: Synthesis and characterization of multifunctional core-shell magnetic nanoparticles for cancer theranostics. Lauren E. Woodard, Cindi L. Dennis, Anilchandra Attaluri, Julie A. Borchers, Mohammad Hedayati, Charlene Dawidczyk, Esteban Velarde, Haoming Zhou, Theodore L. DeWeese, John W. Wong, Peter C. Searson, Martin G. Pomper* and Robert Ivkov.

Second Place:

Tao Yu:  Intravaginal Delivery Of Paclitaxel Via Mucus-Penetrating Particles For Local Chemotherapy Against Cervical Cancer. Yu T, Yang M, Wang Y-Y, Lai SK, Zeng Q, Miao B, Tang BC, Simons BW, Ensign L, Liu G, Chan KWY, Juang C-Y, Mert O, Wood J, Fu J, McMahon MT, Wu T-C, Hung C-F, Hanes J.

Third Place:

Jane Chisholm: Mucus-penetrating cisplatin nanoparticles for the local treatment of lung cancer. Jane Chisholm, Jung Soo Suk, Craig Peacock, Justin Hanes.

Honorable mentions went to:

Anilchandra Attalur: Magnetic Nanoparticle Hyperthermia As Radiosensitizer For Locally Advanced Pancreas Cancer. Anilchandra Attaluri, Haoming Zhou, Yi Zhong, Toni-rose Guiriba, Mohammad Hedayati, Theodore L. DeWeese, Eleni Liapi, Christine Iacobuzio-Donahue, Joseph Herman, and Robert Ivkov

Maureen Wanjare:  The Differentiation and Maturation of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Derived from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells using Biomolecular and Biomechanical Approaches. Maureen Wanjare, Frederick Kuo, Gyul Jung, Nayan Agarwal, Sharon Gerecht

Poster Judges included Robert Ivkov, PhD, assistant professor in radiaton oncology/ radiobiology and Seulki Lee, PhD, assistant professor in neuroradialogy, both from the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine; Rebecca Schulman, PhD, assistant professor in chemical and biomolecular engineering at the Whiting School of Engineering; and Kirsten Crapnell, PhD, and Thomas Joseph, PhD, both of BD Diagnostics.

Check out a gallery of some photos from the poster session shot by PhD candidate Yi-An Lin who works in the laboratory of Honggang Cui in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering.

 

 

 

 

Stem Cell Science, Engineering theme of May 2 symposium

Johns Hopkins Institute for Nanobiotechnology is now accepting posters for its annual symposium to be held May 2 at Owens Auditorium (located between CRB I and CRB II) at the School of Medicine. Deadline for poster registration is April 30. Top presenters are eligible to win one of three NIKON cameras.

All disciplines and topics are encouraged to register, even if not related to theme.

Go to this link for full agenda and to register.

nano-bio-symposium-14-flyer (2)The theme this year is Stem Cell Science and Engineering: State-of-the-Art. Speakers start at 9 a.m. through noon. Then at 1:30 there will be a poster session where students across Johns Hopkins will present some of their current research findings. Judges have been selected from industry and the university. Don’t miss this exciting exploration of how scientists, engineers and clinicians can work together with stem cells to solve some of humanities pressing problems in health and medicine.

This year’s speakers and talk titles include:

• 8:30-9 am Registration Lobby of Owens Auditorium

• 9:00-9:05 Welcome and Introduction of speakers Peter Searson

• 9:05-9:35 Human cell engineering: recent progress in reprogramming cell fates and editing the nuclear genome, Linzhao Cheng

• 9:35-10:05 Regenerating Musculoskeletal Tissues from Fat, Warren Grayson

• 10:05-10:35 Hitting the Bull’s Eye: Targeting HMGA1 in Cancer Stem Cells using Nanotechnology, Linda M. S. Resar

• 10:35-10:45 Coffee Break

• 10:45-11:15 Engineering biomaterials to enhance stem cell potential, Hai-Quan Mao

• 11:15 -11:45 Engineered Human Pluripotent Stem Cells for Disease Modeling Applications, Mark Powers

• 11:45-12:15 Understanding the function of risk genes for mental disorders using iPSC models, Guo-li Ming

Lunch break

• 1:30-3:30 pm Poster Sessions Owens Corridor

• 3:30 Announcement of Poster Session Winners/Adjourn

 

 

 

“Cells Performing Secret Handshake” wins grand prize

Sebastian F. Barreto, a doctoral student of chemical and biomolecular engineering in the laboratory of Sharon Gerecht, won the grand prize for his image “Cells Performing Secret Handshake” from the Regenerative Medicine Foundation. Another image that Barreto submitted received 3rd place (shown below), and a third image received honorable mention.

Late last year, RMF issued an international call for macro-photography of regenerative medicine images taken through a microscope. This inaugural contest resulted in nearly 100 images representing scientists from the United States, Australia, Canada, Germany, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom.

Cells-Performing-Secret-Handshakes

This image by Sebastian Barreto of Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells “performing a secret handshake” won the grand prize in the first photo contest of the Regenerative Medicine Foundation.

Barreto’s image was included in the “Art of Science: Under the Surface” exhibition that featured an opening lecture and public reception with global expert in regenerative medicine Anthony Atala, M.D. and award winning photographer, painter and sculpture, Kelly Milukas, whose talk focused on the impact of art on healing. The winning images will also be featured in a special public patron gallery exhibition component during the Regenerative Medicine Foundation annual meeting held in San Francisco, May 5-7, 2014.

In a congratulatory letter, Joan F. Schanck, the Academic Research Program Officer, Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine and Director of Education for the Regenerative Medicine Foundation, said, “This competition will assist in developing a digital library that can be used to excite, inform and educate a broad audience.”

Barreto is affiliated with both the Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology and with the Physical Sciences-Oncology Center.

Captions for both photos can be found below:

Technical description for the grand prize photo: Epifluorescence image was taken at 1280 x 1024 using an Olympus BX60 microscope. Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVECs) were cultured for five days and stained for F-actin (green), Vascular Endothelial cadherin (VEcad; red), and nuclei was counter-stained with DAPI (blue).

 

Endothelial-Cells-Resisting-Smooth-Muscle-Cell-Pull

Barreto’s image of endothelial cells won 3rd place in the RMF photo contest.

 

Technical description for 3rd place photo: Epifluorescence image was taken at 1280 x 1024 using an Olympus BX60 microscope. Human Endothelial Colony Forming Cells (ECFCs) were cultured for eight days before being co-cultured with human Smooth Muscle Cells (SMCs) for four more days. ECFCs were stained with CD31 (red), SMCs with SM22 (green), and nuclei was counterstained with DAPI (blue).