Researchers honored with Presidential career awards

Two Johns Hopkins researchers were honored by the White House for their research achievements, including one biomedical engineer affiliated with Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology (INBT).

Namandje Bumpus, Ph.D., and Jordan Green, Ph.D., of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine are among 105 winners of Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers, which were announced by the White House on Feb. 18. The awards recognize young researchers who are employed or funded by federal agencies “whose early accomplishments show the greatest promise for assuring America’s pre-eminence in science and engineering and contributing to the awarding agencies’ missions,” according to a White House statement.

“These early-career scientists are leading the way in our efforts to confront and understand challenges from climate change to our health and wellness,” President Barack Obama said in the statement. “We congratulate these accomplished individuals and encourage them to continue to serve as an example of the incredible promise and ingenuity of the American people.”

Namandje Bumpus, left, and Jordan Green. CREDIT Keith Weller, Johns Hopkins Medicine

Namandje Bumpus, left, and Jordan Green.
CREDIT
Keith Weller, Johns Hopkins Medicine

Bumpus, an associate professor of medicine and of pharmacology and molecular sciences, also serves as the school of medicine’s associate dean for institutional and student equity. Her research focuses on how the body processes HIV medications, converting them into different molecules, and the actions of those molecules. In recent studies, she has found genetic differences in how people process popular HIV drugs, suggesting genetic testing should have a greater role to play in combating the virus. “Since joining Johns Hopkins in 2010, Namandje has made tremendous progress toward ultimately making HIV treatment more personalized and effective,” says Mark Anderson, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Department of Medicine. “This is a well-deserved recognition of her work, and I look forward to seeing how she will continue to advance the field.”

Green, an associate professor of biomedical engineering, neurosurgery, oncology and ophthalmology, and a member of INBT, was named one of Popular Science’s Brilliant Ten in 2014. He develops nanoparticles that could potentially deliver therapeutics to the precise place in the body where they’re needed — to make tumor cells self-destruct, for example, while leaving healthy cells intact. “Jordan’s innovations and productivity are exceptional, and his findings have very exciting implications for patients,” says Leslie Tung, Ph.D., interim director of the Department of Biomedical Engineering. “He is truly an extraordinary and exemplary early-career scientist, and a wonderful colleague as well.”

The 105 award winners will be recognized at a White House ceremony this spring.

Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine

Pushing past challenges in undergraduate research

When I first applied to Johns Hopkins University, I was convinced I did not want to study engineering. I was hesitant to participate in any kind of research and wasn’t all that confident in my technical skills. I thought research would be boring and perhaps unnecessarily difficult. Still, I enjoyed biology and chemistry in high school, so I figured I would major in either one of those two subjects. After taking an engineering sampler seminar course, I found myself attracted to chemical and biomolecular engineering (ChemBE). I still had my reservations about majoring in it, but I’m not one to shy away from a challenge. So, I told myself: if I absolutely hate it, I’ll switch to something different, and if I like it, great, I’ll stick with it. And it turned out that I loved it.

Fatima Umanzor works in the laboratory of Denis Wirtz (photo by Mary Spiro)

Fatima Umanzor works in the laboratory of Denis Wirtz (photo by Mary Spiro)

After a semester of taking introductory chemistry and physics classes, I sat down with my faculty advisor, Dr. Denis Wirtz, and he asked me if I had thought about research. I told him that I had and that I really wanted to work in his lab, even if it meant waiting for a spot to open up. Smiling, he told me it would be no problem. I got an email in the late summer from my soon-to-be mentor, Hasini Jayatilaka, asking whether I would be interested in interviewing to work for her. Excited, I replied that I would be and we met soon after. Since then, my perception of research has changed for the better.

These days, I can be found in the lab most of the time, with the exception of weeks filled with midterms. When I’m not in class, I may be in the cell culture room making 3D type I collagen I matrices or conducting immunofluorescence staining, or in the bacterial room performing an RNA extraction for PCR, or in the office space, analyzing data. With each experiment that we run, I learn something new. Most of what I know about the way cancer works comes from the research that I’ve conducted related to cancer cell metastasis in Dr. Wirtz’s lab, which is a part of the Institute for NanoBioTechnology (INBT). I continue to learn more from these investigations than I do in the classroom. I’ve gained so many new skills that I know will be invaluable one day should I decide to pursue my own PhD or work in an industrial setting.

But I’ve gained so much more than just research experience: I’ve become more confident in my ability to learn and grow as a student and researcher, my mentor and peers in the lab have become sources of advice and wisdom, as well as some of my closest friends, and I’ve been exposed to so many cool opportunities I didn’t know I had before. For example, this summer I was able to participate in a Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program at the University of Pittsburgh, and I’m certain that I have my lab experience (and Dr. Wirtz) to thank for making that experience possible.

While there are days that I feel like I’m not cut out for ChemBE, I can always come back to my research team and feel assured that I’m exactly where I’m supposed to be. Between team outings and hearing stories of past experiences, I know that I am not alone when times get hard. And while at times I struggle to deal with discouraging exam grades or frustratingly difficult problem sets, I know that my experiences more than make up for flaws in other aspects and that the time spent on my work in the lab is not in vain. I am lucky enough to work for someone who sees a lot of potential in me, even when I don’t see it in myself, and pushes me to pursue various opportunities and believes in me. That belief and support is a priceless part of what I get from working in the INBT.

Overall, I would say research is one of the most rewarding aspects of my undergraduate career. I’ve made friends, gained an assortment of skills and a lot of new knowledge, and have learned more about myself and potential post-grad opportunities. I’m grateful I can come into a space every day with a purpose and set goals for myself, surrounded by people who are passionate about their work, and be motivated to work hard and discover something new each day.

Fatima Umanzor is a junior studying chemical and biomolecular engineering with a concentration in molecular and cellular bioengineering and an interest in cancer metastasis and tumorigenesis.

All press inquiries about INBT should be directed to Mary Spiro, INBT’s science writer and media relations director at mspiroATjhu.edu.

 

 

Two INBT affiliates among 2016 Siebel Scholars

Two of the five Johns Hopkins graduate students who were recently named to the 2016 class of Siebel Scholars are affiliated with Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology. Congratulations to Sebastian F. Barreto Ortiz, who is completing his PhD in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering in the lab of Sharon Gerecht, and to Dong Jin Shin, who is completing his PhD in biomedical engineering in the laboratory of Jeff Tza-Huei Wang in the Department of Mechanical Engineering.

Dong Jin Shin (l) and Sebastian Barreto-Ortiz are among the 2016 Siebel Scholars.

Dong Jin Shin (l) and Sebastian Barreto-Ortiz are among the 2016 Siebel Scholars.

Barreto-Ortiz, who was part of INBT’s Center for Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence training grant, is developing human blood vessels to replace damaged or diseased vessels in patients. Barreto engineered the first self-standing mid-sized vascular construct (less than 1 millimeter in diameter), which could eventually connect tiny capillaries with much larger lab-grown vessels.

Shin is a fellow in INBT’s Cancer Nanotechnology Training Center. His research focuses on droplet magnetofluidics and biomedical instrumentation with the aim to build small, low-cost lab-on-a-chip devices that can perform diagnostic tests at a point-of-care that produce results in an hour or less. He recently unveiled a prototype that can detect the sexually transmitted disease chlamydia within 30 minutes. (Read more about this technology in an article in The Baltimore Sun here.) The technology could eventually be used to detect cancer biomarkers as well as infectious diseases such as strep throat and the flu.

The merit-based Siebel program recognizes research skills, academic achievements and leadership qualities and provides $35,000 for use in the students’ final year of graduate studies. Read about all the Siebel scholars here.

All press inquiries about INBT should be directed to Mary Spiro, INBT’s science writer and media relations director at mspiroATjhu.edu.

INBT alum named 2015 Outstanding Young Engineer in Maryland

Laura Ensign-Hodges, PhD, an assistant professor in the Department of Ophthalmology at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, was recently named the 2015 Outstanding Young Engineer by the Maryland Academy of Sciences at the Maryland Science Center (see video below). Ensign, who graduated from Johns Hopkins with a doctorate in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering in 2012, was a Howard Hughes Medical Institute fellow through the Institute for NanoBioTechnology and among INBT’s first training grant students. We asked her how her experience with INBT helped guide her career path.

Copyright 2011 by Marty Katz

Laura Ensign-Hodges (Photo by Marty Katz)

What role did your association with INBT play in your research and career path?

Joining INBT as an HHMI fellow was one of the reasons I decided to come to JHU for graduate school. The emphasis on multidisciplinary research is something I’ve certainly carried with me throughout my training. I strongly believe that truly impactful research results from multidisciplinary teams/collaboration.

Why did you choose to stay at JHU/JHMI after graduation?

I chose to stay at JHU/JHMI for a few reasons: (1) I had many new and exciting research areas developing to which I am intellectually and emotionally attached, (2) the research environment at JHU/JHMI is unparalleled and an ideal place for multidisciplinary collaboration and translational research;  and (3) it made the most sense for my family as well as my career.

What advice might you give to young women thinking about going into engineering?

My advice for women thinking about going into engineering is to approach it with no reservations or assumptions. Although engineering is still a male-dominated field, I have worked alongside many well-respected, successful female engineers … and they didn’t have to act more “like a man”!

What are your current research interests?

My current research interests can generally be encompassed in mucosal drug delivery and characterization of mucosal barriers and microbiome. The applications range from treatment of inflammatory bowel disease to prevention of preterm labor.

Learn more about Laura Ensign-Hodges’ research here.

 

All press inquiries about INBT should be directed to Mary Spiro, INBT’s science writer and media relations director at mspiroATjhu.edu.

Gerecht to present Frontier Award Lecture Dec. 1

Sharon Gerecht, Kent Gordon Croft Investment Management Faculty Scholar and associate professor in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, will present the Inaugural President’s Frontier Award Lecture at 11 a.m. on Tuesday, Dec. 1 in Mason Hall Auditorium. A reception will follow.

Sharon Gerecht

Sharon Gerecht

Gerecht is a bioengineer whose research focuses on using engineering fundamentals to study basic questions in stem cell biology in order to regenerate and repair damaged blood vessels and halt the spread of cancer.

In January, Gerecht became the first winner of the $250,000 President’s Frontier Award. She will become an associate director of the Institute for Nanobiotechnology in January.

Gerecht and Mao to join INBT leadership effective January 1

The Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology (INBT) recently announced that Sharon Gerecht and Hai-Quan Mao have been appointed as associate directors, effective January 1, 2016.

“The addition of Gerecht and Mao to the Institute’s leadership team will be crucial in developing new research areas,” says director Peter C. Searson, the Joseph R. and Lynn C. Reynolds Professor in Materials Science and Engineering at the Whiting School.

mao-gerecht

Hai-Quan Mao and Sharon Gerecht join INBT as associate directors in 2016

Associate director Denis Wirtz, Vice Provost for Research and the Theophilus H. Smoot Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering adds, “Their broad research interests and forward-thinking vision will contribute to shaping the institute’s future.”

Both Gerecht and Mao are engaged in collaborative projects with investigators in Johns Hopkins University’s School of Medicine, Bloomberg School of Public Health, and Krieger School of Arts and Sciences, and the university’s Applied Physics Laboratory.

Gerecht, the Kent Gordon Croft Investment Management Faculty Scholar and an associate professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering, has been a member of the INBT since arriving at Johns Hopkins in 2007. Gerecht’s research interests include stem cell differentiation, biomaterials development and tissue engineering approaches for regenerative medicine and cancer. In 2015, Gerecht received the inaugural President’s Frontier Award from Johns Hopkins University, in recognition of her scholarly achievements and exceptional promise.

Mao, a professor of materials science and engineering, has been active in INBT since its inception in 2006.  Mao holds joint appointments in the Translational Tissue Engineering Center in the School of Medicine and the Whitaker Biomedical Engineering Institute. His research focuses on creating nanofiber matrix platforms to direct stem cell expansion and differentiation, nanomaterials to modulate the immunoenvironment and promote neural regeneration, and developing nanoparticle systems to deliver plasmid DNA, siRNA, vaccines and other therapeutic agents.

“INBT has been instrumental in advancing science and engineering in critically important areas of research,” says Ed Schlesinger, the Benjamin T. Rome Dean of the Whiting School of Engineering. “An additional manifestation of the INBT’s success and growth is the astonishingly talented faculty who are part of the institute and who are willing and able to take on leadership roles. I have no doubt that in their new roles Sharon and Hai-Quan will help advance the INBT’s mission and its stellar reputation.”

INBT was launched in 2006 with support from Senator Barbara Mikulski to promote multidisciplinary research at the interface of nanotechnology and medicine.  The institute, with more than 250 affiliated faculty members from the Johns Hopkins University’s School of Medicine, Whiting School of Engineering, Krieger School of Arts and Sciences, School of Education, Bloomberg School of Public Heath, and the Applied Physics Laboratory, is home to several center grants and numerous education, training, and outreach programs.

All press inquiries about this program or about INBT in general should be directed to Mary Spiro, INBT’s science writer and media relations director at mspiroATjhu.edu.

New INBT symposium puts undergrad research in the spotlight

2015 INBT Undergraduate Symposium

2015 INBT Undergraduate Symposium

Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology (INBT) held its first-ever undergraduate research symposium “Innovations in Medicine: An Engineering and Biological Perspective” on Nov. 5, 2015 in the Glass Pavilion in Levering on the Homewood campus. Members of the INBT Undergraduate Research Leaders team organized the event.  Thirty-six posters were presented and four students gave keynote talks. Approximately 70 people attended throughout the day.

The symposium supports INBT’s mission to promote interdisciplinary research and collaboration at all academic levels. Since more than 100 undergraduates conduct research in institute-affiliated laboratories across the university, members of INBT’s Undergraduate Research Leaders, founded in 2012, felt a research symposium showcasing only undergraduate work was needed.

Ben Wheeler

Ben Wheeler

“We have in the past focused primarily on building community within INBT and helping to facilitate opportunities for undergraduates to build their research repertoire and network with others here at Hopkins and beyond,” said Benjamin Wheeler (2016 BME), who co-organized the event. “I think hosting the symposium fit very nicely with our previous goals and event planning experience but on a much larger scale. In organizing it, our goals were to allow undergraduates across all of Hopkins Campuses to showcase their amazing work while getting practice making posters, giving talks, and enjoying face time with professors and representatives from outside industry.”

In addition to poster presentations, four students were chosen to give talks during the symposium. They included: Andrew Tsai (BME 2017/Miller Lab) “Tunable Electrospun Antimicrobial Coatings for Orthopedic Implants;” Miguel Sobral (BME 2017/ Gerecht Lab) “Addressing the Shortcomings of Convection Enhances Delivery to the Brain;” Xinyi Xin (ChemBE 2017/ Cui Lab) “Tuning Paclitaxel-Drug Amphiphiles Self-Assembly Behavior by Modification of Hydrophobicity and Aromaticity;” and Michael Saunders (ChemBE 2016/ Gerecht Lab) “The Creation and Use of PDMS Substrates for Examining Matrix Elasticity.”

“We thought the symposium would be a great opportunity to feature the scientific research being done by undergraduate students at Hopkins not just within INBT but campus wide,” said event co-organizer Victoria Laney (ChemBE 2016). “We came up with ‘Innovations in Medicine’ as this year’s theme because we thought it really embodied the spirit of INBT and of many other labs at Hopkins.”

Victoria Laney

Victoria Laney

Prizes for top poster presenters were given to the following students:

First Place

  • Brendan Deng, “The Role of Megf11 in Oligodendrocyte Precursor Cell Tiling and Differentiation”

Second Place

  • Melissa Lin, “Monitoring Uterine Contractions in the Developing World”

Crowd Favorites

  • Fatima Umanzor, “Functional coupling of Cancer Cell Proliferation and Migration through the Synergistic Paracrine Signaling of Interleukins 6/8”
  • Asish Anam, “Design of a Novel Functionalized Hyaluronic Acid Hydrogel Microenvironment for Regulation of Cell Migration for Peripheral Nerve Regeneration Applications.”
2015 INBT Undergraduate Symposium

2015 INBT Undergraduate Symposium

The team invited judges to evaluate the posters on display. They included INBT alumni Matt Dallas (Thermo Fisher), Laura Dickson (Gemstone), and Steven Lu (Secant), current doctoral candidate Kristen Kozielski (Green Lab), and INBT affiliated faculty members Michael Edidin from biology and Jennifer Elisseeff from biomedical engineering.

Laney said the team intends to make sure the undergraduate symposium continues to happen for years to come.  “We absolutely plan on passing on the torch to our incredible juniors,” Laney said. “They also contributed a lot of time and effort into preparing this symposium, and we believe that they have the experience, dedication and enthusiasm to pull it off again.”

DSC_0892web

2015 Undergraduate Research Symposium

Story and photos by Mary Spiro.

All press inquiries about this program or about INBT in general should be directed to Mary Spiro, INBT’s science writer and media relations director at mspiroATjhu.edu.

 

 

High school intern analyzes insect athletics for improved robot design

Nico Deshler was one of three high school students that Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology was able to support for a research internship during Summer 2015. Deshler, a rising senior at the Washington International School, conducted research in INBT affiliated labs through a supplement to the institute’s annual National Science Foundation funded Research Experience for Undergraduates.

Nico Deshler, center, with Emily Palmer, left, and Prof.  Mittal, right. Photo by Will Kirk.

Nico Deshler, center, with Emily Palmer, left, and Prof. Mittal, right. Photo by Will Kirk.

Deshler worked in the mechanical engineering laboratory of Rajat Mittal, who is studying the motion of spider crickets to improve robot design. Deshler was co-mentored by Noah Cowan, associate professor of mechanical engineering. The research team thinks that by analyzing the movements of non-human creatures, they may engineer better helper robot designs. Read more about this fascinating work, including a slow-motion video of crickets jumping, in a Johns Hopkins University press release.

Other high schoolers who participated in the summer REU supplemental program included Prathik Naidu, a student at Thomas Jefferson High School who worked in the Martin Ulmschneider lab and Nahom Yimam, a student at Thomas S. Wooton High School who worked in the Peter Searson lab.

All press inquiries about this program or about INBT in general should be directed to Mary Spiro, INBT’s science writer and media relations director at mspiroATjhu.edu.

 

International research experience info sessions Oct 22

Through a National Science Foundation grant, Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology has been able to offer the chance for several students to conduct research abroad. INBT’s International Research Experience for Students (IRES) has been sending undergraduates and some grad students to Leuven, Belgium to conduct 10 weeks of summer research at IMEC since 2009. IMEC is known as for its state-of-the-art nano- and micro fabrication facilities and for being a hub of international collaborative multi-disciplinary work. IMEC researchers from Johns Hopkins are supported with travel expenses, housing and a stipend. Come find out more at these two info sessions on October 22. Session 1 is from 1-2 p.m. in Shaffer 100 and Session 2 is from 5-6 p.m. in the Mason Hall Alumni boardroom. RSVP to tfekete1@jhu.edu.

IRES Flyer 10-20-15

First-ever INBT undergraduate symposium set for Nov 5

Save the date November 5, 2015 for the inaugural  Undergraduate Research Symposium hosted  by Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology’s Undergraduate Leadership Board.

“Innovations in Medicine: An Engineering & Biological Perspective” will be held Thursday, November 5 from 1- 6 p.m. in the Levering Glass Pavilion and Arellano Theatre.  The event includes a poster session and judging from 1 – 4:30 p.m. and speakers from  3 – 4  p.m.

Posters and speaker abstracts are now being accepted. You may submit your abstracts and posters online here, and all majors are invited to participate. The Deadline for submission is Oct 23 at 11:59 p.m.

postcard symposium