REU student profile: Rebecca Majewski

DNA, the genetic sequence that tells cells what proteins to manufacture, typically resides inside the nucleus of a cell, but not always. Rebecca Majewski is studying the uptake of DNA into cell nuclei using a different polymer chains. Rebecca is a rising senior in BioMolecular Engineering from the Milwaukee School of Engineering and is working as a summer intern in the Johns Hopkins Institute for Nanobiotechnology’s REU program.

“We are interested in how much of the DNA with the polyplex can get into the nucleus,” she said, but explains that DNA associated outside of the nucleus can cause false higher measurements.

Rebecca Majewski. Photo by Mary Spiro

Rebecca Majewski. Photo by Mary Spiro

Rebecca is washing the cells with the nuclei to get rid of DNA outside the nucleus and then comparing the measurement of uptake of the DNA by the cell versus the measurement of the uptake of DNA by the nucleus.

“We are interested in what DNA gets inserted into the nucleus because that is what is ultimately expressed. It is important to find out how much makes it to the final destination and then is expressed. The goal of this work is to test different polymer chains to see which one actually does the better job of getting the DNA into the nucleus,” she said.

Rebecca works alongside PhD students and postdoctoral fellows in the biomedical engineering lab of Jordan Green lab at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. She says she highly values the opportunity for a research experience through INBT’s REU because her undergraduate institution does not train graduate students.

For all press inquiries regarding INBT, its faculty and programs, contact Mary Spiro, mspiro@jhu.edu or 410-516-4802.

Three new science and engineering films to premiere at INBT fest

INBT’s Annual SCIENCE and ENGINEERING Film Fest is Wednesday, July 23 at 10:30 a.m. in Schaffer 3 at Johns Hopkins University Homewood campus. Students from the summer class Science Communication for Scientists and Engineers: Video News Releases will be presenting their final projects and be availablmovie_clapper_board_clip_art_23354e for question and answer about their video news releases.

Film topics this year include drug delivery, lab-on-a-chip technology and how cells become cancerous. Don’t miss this opportunity to see the students’ work up on the big screen!!!!!!! This event is open to the entire Johns Hopkins community. FREE.

Facebook event page here.

Check out a previous video made in this class:

REU student profile: Ian Reucroft

Sitting at what looks like a pottery wheeled turned on its side, Ian Reucroft is using a method called electrospinning to create a nano-scale polymer fiber embedded with a drug that encourages nerve growth. The strand is barely visible to the eye, but the resulting fibers resemble spider web.

Ian Reucroft, a rising junior in Biomedical Engineering at Rutgers University, is working in the medical school campus laboratory of Hai-Quan Mao, professor of materials sciences and engineering at Johns Hopkins University. He is part of Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology’s summer REU, or research experience for undergraduates program.

Ian Reucroft in the Mao lab. Photo by Mary Spiro.

Ian Reucroft in the Mao lab. Photo by Mary Spiro.

“We are developing a material to help regrow nerves, either in central or peripheral nervous systems,” said Ian. One method of doing that he explained is to make nanofibers and incorporating a drug into those fibers, drugs that promote neuronic growth or cell survival or various other beneficial qualities. The Mao lab is looking into a relatively new and not well-studied drug called Sunitinib that promotes neuronal survival.

“We make a solution of the component to make the fiber, which is this case is polylactic acid (PLA), and the drug, which I have to dissolve into the solution,” Ian said. Although the drug seems to remain stable in solution, one of the challenges Ian has faced has been improving the distribution of the drug along the fiber.

This is Ian’s first experience with electrospinning but not his first time conducting research. He plans to pursue a PhD in biomedical engineering and remain in academia.

For all press inquiries regarding INBT, its faculty and programs, contact Mary Spiro, mspiro@jhu.edu or 410-516-4802.

The IMEC blog and why you should read it

Every summer since 2009, Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology has been sending students to the lovely town of Leuven in Belgium to conduct 10 weeks of research at IMEC, that country’s leader in nanoelectronics fabrication and testing. The students, both undergraduates and pre-doctoral students, collaborate on projects coordinated by Hopkins and IMEC faculty.

The research program is co-funded by the National Science Foundation International Research Experience for Students (IRES) program, by INBT and by IMEC. Travel, housing and a stipend are covered for each student. They work hard during the week, but weekends are open for European travel, which they all take advantage of.

IMEC summer researchers from left, Matthew Gonzalez, Polly Ma, Rustin Golnabi and Eugene Yoon.

IMEC summer researchers from left, Matthew Gonzalez, Polly Ma, Rustin Golnabi and Eugene Yoon.

We ask the students to blog about their experiences there. Four students are currently working at IMEC for summer 2014. This year the blog has been pretty active, so we invite you to check it out. Find out what it is like to conduct research in a foreign country. Find out about Belgian beer. Experience their summer away vicariously through their writings and photos.

You can find the IMEC blog here.

For all press inquiries regarding INBT, its faculty and programs, contact Mary Spiro, mspiro@jhu.edu or 410-516-4802.

Congratulations to INBT symposium poster prize winners

Five winners took home prizes during the poster session held at the annual symposium hosted by Johns Hopkins Institute for Nanobiotechnology May 2 at the School of Medicine. The theme of the symposium was Stem Cell Science and Engineeering: State of the Art. Fifty-six posters were presented from disciplines across the university and were judged by faculty and industry experts. First, second and third place winners won Nikon cameras and honorable mentions won digital frame key chains.

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From left, Rebecca Schulman, Thomas Joseph, Kirsten Crapnell, Lauren Woodard, Jane Chisholm, Tao Yu, and Robert Ivkov. (Photo by Yi-An Lin)

The winners and poster titles included:

First Place:

Lauren Woodard: Synthesis and characterization of multifunctional core-shell magnetic nanoparticles for cancer theranostics. Lauren E. Woodard, Cindi L. Dennis, Anilchandra Attaluri, Julie A. Borchers, Mohammad Hedayati, Charlene Dawidczyk, Esteban Velarde, Haoming Zhou, Theodore L. DeWeese, John W. Wong, Peter C. Searson, Martin G. Pomper* and Robert Ivkov.

Second Place:

Tao Yu:  Intravaginal Delivery Of Paclitaxel Via Mucus-Penetrating Particles For Local Chemotherapy Against Cervical Cancer. Yu T, Yang M, Wang Y-Y, Lai SK, Zeng Q, Miao B, Tang BC, Simons BW, Ensign L, Liu G, Chan KWY, Juang C-Y, Mert O, Wood J, Fu J, McMahon MT, Wu T-C, Hung C-F, Hanes J.

Third Place:

Jane Chisholm: Mucus-penetrating cisplatin nanoparticles for the local treatment of lung cancer. Jane Chisholm, Jung Soo Suk, Craig Peacock, Justin Hanes.

Honorable mentions went to:

Anilchandra Attalur: Magnetic Nanoparticle Hyperthermia As Radiosensitizer For Locally Advanced Pancreas Cancer. Anilchandra Attaluri, Haoming Zhou, Yi Zhong, Toni-rose Guiriba, Mohammad Hedayati, Theodore L. DeWeese, Eleni Liapi, Christine Iacobuzio-Donahue, Joseph Herman, and Robert Ivkov

Maureen Wanjare:  The Differentiation and Maturation of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Derived from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells using Biomolecular and Biomechanical Approaches. Maureen Wanjare, Frederick Kuo, Gyul Jung, Nayan Agarwal, Sharon Gerecht

Poster Judges included Robert Ivkov, PhD, assistant professor in radiaton oncology/ radiobiology and Seulki Lee, PhD, assistant professor in neuroradialogy, both from the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine; Rebecca Schulman, PhD, assistant professor in chemical and biomolecular engineering at the Whiting School of Engineering; and Kirsten Crapnell, PhD, and Thomas Joseph, PhD, both of BD Diagnostics.

Check out a gallery of some photos from the poster session shot by PhD candidate Yi-An Lin who works in the laboratory of Honggang Cui in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering.

 

 

 

 

Student engineers solve village problems through Global Engineering Innovation Program

Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology hosts teams of students to travel to foreign countries to apply their engineering skills to solve local problems through a program called Global Engineering Innovation. This story, featured in the Johns Hopkins Gazette, describes one of those projects in Nazaçu, along the Amazon River in Brazil: the design and production of a safer cassava mill that reduces the risk of injury. INBT has also hosted teams in Tanzania and India.

GEU design team with the finalized pedal power grain mill in Tanzania (from left to right) Kristen Kosielski, Jeannine Coburn, Iwen Wu and local resident Jackson. (Photo courtesy Jeannine Coburn)

GEU design team with the finalized pedal power grain mill in Tanzania (from left to right) Kristen Kosielski, Jeannine Coburn, Iwen Wu and local resident Jackson. (Photo courtesy Jeannine Coburn)

Said program director Jennifer Elisseeff, the Jules Stein Professor of Ophthalmology at the Wilmer Eye Institute: “This program has enormous potential to have students visit various communities around the world to design and solve real problems that can help people in their daily lives.”

Read more from the Gazette article here.

Read more about the INBT GEI program here.

 

Interning in INBT’s animation studio

Students from the Maryland Institute College of Art, aka MICA, have been interning at the Johns Hopkins Institute for NanobioTechnology’s Animation Studios pretty much since the studio came into existence in 2007. Studio director and INBT web guru Martin Rietveld organizes the student internships each semester and every summer.

Anny Lai.

Anny Lai.

Most evenings, MICA graphic design major Anny Lai can be found in the INBT animation computer lab working on animating the process of stem cell based tissue regeneration. She has blogged about her experience here.

For more information about internships with INBT, which are open to JHU students, MICA students and others training in the arts, go to this link. Programs used in the animation studio include Cinema 4D, AfterEffects and Adobe Flash.

Even students without training or a background in the arts are welcome to take Martin’s independent study course in animation. Students in engineering and the basic sciences have created smaller animation projects that they use in academic presentations or have submitted to peer-reviewed journals for publication.

Contact Martin at rietveld@jhu.edu for more information.

What is INBT?

At Johns Hopkins University, the Institute for NanoBioTechnology is sort of a strange hybrid animal— a unique entity in academia. Founded in 2006, we are a virtual center that draws faculty membership from four divisions – the medical school, engineering school, school of arts and sciences and from public health.

Four different divisions comprise INBT.

Four different divisions comprise INBT.

Two faculty members, Peter Searson, the Joseph R. and Lynn C. Reynolds Professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, and Denis Wirtz, the Theophilus H. Smoot Professor in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, started INBT. They thought it made sense to combine the efforts of people in engineering with people working in the medical and basic sciences as well as in public health to better solve problems in health care. We have more than 220 affiliated faculty members. There are no other centers or institutes at Hopkins with as many participants from as many different disciplines.

Any faculty member can become a member of INBT; they just have to have an interest in incorporating nanobiotechnology—or science at the scale of just a few atoms—into their research. Researchers at INBT are working on everything from drug delivery systems to solving problems in basic science and engineering using nanobiotechnology.

Physically, INBT is located on the Johns Hopkins Homewood campus in Suite 100 of Croft Hall. That’s where our administrative offices are and some of our faculty members have laboratories in this building. But our research occurs wherever our faculty members are working, and much of that is at the School of Medicine. In fact, nearly half of our members come from the medical school. Faculty members in other divisions are mostly likely collaborating with people at the School of Medicine.

At INBT, we search for funding opportunities for our members and offer small seed grants that help collaborators launch projects. Sometimes these projects are later funded and sustained by larger federal grants. We feel good about helping new ideas find “legs”.

In addition, we train up-and-coming scientists and engineers from high school through the postdoctoral level in our affiliated labs. These include short-term summer programs as well as highly competitive government funded research experiences and fellowships that last several years. INBT is educating the next generation of researchers who will solve problems at the interface of science, engineering and medicine. Our graduate students who fulfill specific requirements are awarded a Certificate of Advanced Study in NanoBioTechnology.

We have global outreach programs as well. INBT has funded research teams to India and Tanzania to solve engineering problems in local communities. Sometimes the challenges are medical, and sometimes they are purely engineering, but the teams much use local materials and resources to accomplish their goals.

Finally, we have industry affiliations. By working with companies in the U.S. and worldwide, we are developing training opportunities for our students that result in the development of new knowledge and hopefully new patented and marketable products. We don’t want to keep our innovations in the lab; we want to bring them to people for the benefit of humankind.

So in a nutshell, that’s what INBT is all about. To learn more about some of our specific programs and about some of the other centers we have launched under the INBT “brand”, read the other articles in this series. You can also watch this video about INBT. 

This article is part of a series of brief reports on INBT and its different components and programs. Together, we hope these articles will help readers inside and outside of the Johns Hopkins University community to understand what INBT is and what we do.

 

My life as an undergraduate researcher

I joined the Denis Wirtz Lab in the Institute for NanoBioTechnology the summer after my freshman year. I was nervous to start in a lab with such brilliant scientists, but everyone was really welcoming and friendly. After observing graduate students and postdoctoral fellows in the lab, I was given my own project. I had free rein to design the protocol and figure out how to analyze the data.

Katherine Tschudi. (Photo by Mary Spiro)

Katherine Tschudi. (Photo by Mary Spiro)

At first, it was difficult, but working through this and the inevitable obstacles that came made me a better researcher and scientist. I am incredibly grateful for this experience as a senior as I look back and see how the Wirtz Lab has helped me grow professionally and academically.

As a Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering major at Hopkins, we study how different physical, chemical, and biological processes work. In Wirtz Lab, I have had the opportunity to see this in action. Through my two years, I’ve looked at the differences in cell proliferation and motility for metastatic and primary cancer cells. I learned how to ask the right questions, how to think critically about data, and how to solve problems. Using the skills from Wirtz Lab, I also had the amazing opportunity to research abroad in Switzerland at the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne.

In February 2014, I will be starting a job at Genentech, and I give a lot of credit to the great undergraduate research experience I’ve had in INBT. If you want to read more about my research experiences, I wrote a blog for Hopkins Admissions during my years at Hopkins and have around six posts detailing my experience.

Click here to read Kate’s six blog entires about working in the Wirtz Lab at Hopkins-Interactive.

Kate Tschudi earned her degree in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering in December 2013. She is just one of the many undergraduate students who have benefitted by participating in undergraduate research in an INBT affiliated laboratory. Johns Hopkins University, founded as a research institute, emphasizes undergraduate research experiences, and more than half of the undergraduates participate in research projects at some point during their academic careers here.  Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology actively supports undergraduate research opportunities and in an informal way helps match students to projects in laboratories of affiliated faculty members. 

Related Links:

Wirtz Lab

 

Studying cells in 3D, the way it should be

When scientists experiment on cells in a flat Petri dish, it’s more been a matter of convenience than anything that recapitulates what that cell experiences in real life. Johns Hopkins professor Denis Wirtz for some time has been growing and studying cells three dimensions, rather than the traditional two dimensions. And pretty much, he’s discovered that a lot of what we think we know about cells is dead wrong.

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Cell in 3D. Image by Anjil Giri/Wirtz Lab

In this recent article by Johns Hopkins writer Dale Keiger, you will discover what Wirtz has discovered through his investigations. Furthermore, you will find out about the man behind these revolutionary ideas that are turning basic cell biology upside-down, as well as challenge a lot of what we thought we understood about diseases like cancer.

Wirtz directs the Johns Hopkins Physical-Sciences Oncology Center and is associate director and co-founder of Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology. He recently launched the Center for Digital Pathology. He is a the Theophilus Halley Smoot professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering.

You can read the entire magazine article “Moving cancer research out of the Petri dish and into the third dimension” online here at the JHU Hub.