INBT-Shirt Design Contest

You are cordially invited to submit a design for the INBT-Shirt Design Contest!

Here are the rules:

1) You need to use the Gildan Ultra Cotton T-Shirt on Custom Ink to design your shirt. You can chose any color scheme you like. Here’s a link to the page.

2) You need to use the inbt logo somewhere on the tshirt. I’ve attached two inbt logos that can be uploaded while you design.

Besides that the sky is the limit in terms of your design. The submission deadline is Friday, March 1st. Please submit all designs to me. My email is scmjhu@gmail.com.

A panel consisting of various members from the INBT will judge all the tshirt designs and chose the best one. The undergrad who submits the best design will receive a $25 gift card!!

At the end of the contest, if there is an outstanding submission, all INBT undergraduate researchers will receive free tshirts!! So start designing, and may the odds be ever in your favor.

Please let me know if you have any questions.

Good luck,

Shaun McGovern

Links to the logos are below.

inbt-logo

inbt-undergrad-research-shirt-3

jhu

 

Self-assembling drug molecules could fight cancer

A popular method of targeted drug delivery for anti-cancer drugs involves doping another material with the desired pharmaceutical to obtain better targeting efficiency to tumor sites. The problem with this method, researchers have discovered, is that the quantity of drug payload per delivery unit can vary widely and that the materials used for delivery can have toxic side effects.

But what if you could turn the drug molecule itself into a nanoscale delivery system, cutting out the middleman completely?

TEM image of nanotubes formed by self-assembly of an anticancer drug amphiphile. These nanotubes possess a fixed drug loading of 38% (w/w). Image from Cui Lab.

TEM image of nanotubes formed by self-assembly of an anticancer drug amphiphile. These nanotubes possess a fixed drug loading of 38% (w/w). Image from Cui Lab.

Using the process of molecular self-assembly, that is what Honggang Cui, an assistant professor in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at Johns Hopkins University, is attempting to do. His efforts have netted him the prestigious Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Award from the National Science Foundation. Cui, an affiliated faculty member of the Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology, will receive the $500,000 award over five years.

Cui explained that a current method of delivering anti-cancer drugs is to enclose them in a nanoscale carrier made of natural or synthetic materials, but this method presents several challenges. “The amount of drug loaded per carrier is very much limited and varies from batch to batch. Even in the same batch, there is a drug loading variation from carrier to carrier. Additionally, the carrier material itself may have toxic side effects,” he said.

Cui’s research seeks to eliminate the need for the carrier by coaxing the drug molecules themselves to form their own carrier through the process of self-assembly. His team is developing new molecular engineering strategies to assemble anti-cancer drugs into supramolecular nanostructures.

“Such supramolecules could carry as much as 100 percent of the drug, would possess a fixed amount of drug per nanostructure and would minimize the potential toxicity of the carrier,” Cui said.

To learn more about research in the Cui lab go to http://www.jhu.edu/cui/

 

Nanotech checks on transplanted cell survival

Researchers at Johns Hopkins are using nanotechnology to track the survival and location of transplanted cells. The device, based on nanoscale ph sensors and imaging via magnetic resonance, could help improve outcomes from cell replacement therapies used for conditions such as liver disease or type 1 diabetes.

Cartoon showing nanoscale probe used to detect pH change caused by death of transplanted cell. (McMahon/Nature Materials)

Cartoon showing nanoscale probe used to detect pH change caused by death of transplanted cell. (McMahon/Nature Materials)

“This technology has the potential to turn the human body into less of a black box and tell us if transplanted cells are still alive,” says Mike McMahon, Ph.D., an associate professor of radiology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine principal investigator on the study. “That information will be invaluable in fine-tuning therapies.”

Transplanted cells often fall victim to assault from the body’s immune system, which sees the news cells as foreign invaders. Says McMahon,  “once you put the cells in, you really have no idea how long they survive.”

When cells die there is a change in the acidity nearby. Using this fact, the researchers developed a nanoparticle sensor that could both sense the change in pH and be detected via MRI. The team tested the sensors on mice and found they they were able to track the location of surviving transplanted cells and determine the proportion that had survived.

“It was exciting to see that this works so well in a living body,” says research fellow Kannie Chan, Ph.D., the lead author on the study, which was published in Nature Materials. This should take a lot of the guesswork out of cell transplantation by letting doctors see whether the cells survive, and if not, when they die,” Chan says. “That way they may be able to figure out what’s killing the cells, and how to prevent it.”

Chan works in the laboratory of Jeff Bulte, Ph.D., the director of cellular imaging at Johns Hopkins’ Institute for Cell Engineering. Bulte and McMahon collaborated on the study. Additional authors include Guanshu Liu, Xiaolei Song, Heechul Kim, Tao Yu, Dian R. Arifin, Assaf A. Gilad, Justin Hanes, Piotr Walczak and Peter C. M. van Zijl, all of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. McMahan, Bulte, Gilad, Hanes and van Zijl are all affiliated faculty members of Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology.

Funding for this study was provided by the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (grant numbers R01 EB012590, EB015031, EB015032 and EB007825).

Follow this link to read the paper, MRI-detectable pH nanosensors incorporated into hydrogels for in vivo sensing of transplanted-cell viability, in Nature Materials online http://www.nature.com/nmat/journal/vaop/ncurrent/abs/nmat3525.html

FLC event focuses on Maryland technology

Screen Shot 2013-02-04 at 10.59.42 AMMaryland Technology Past, Present and Future is the topic of a day-long symposium, February 28 at the National Electronics Museum hosted by the Federal Laboratory Consortium Mid-Atlantic Region.

The FLC is a national organization chartered by Congress to foster technology transfer from federal research laboratories and field centers, to other federal agencies; state and local government; academia and the private sector. One of the regional consortium’s efforts has been to conduct a series of one-day forums that highlight specific areas of technology and encourage collaboration and partnership development with federal labs.

Registration is $25 and includes refreshments and lunch. Registration deadline is February 15 and can be made online at this link.

The National Electronics Museum is located at 1745 West Nursery Road in Linthicum, Md. The symposium begins with registration at 8:15 a.m. and adjourns at 3:45 p.m.

In addition to the presentations, the day will offer the opportunity to meet scientists from the regions National Labs such as NASA, NIST, NIH and Goddard as well as representatives of local industry. In addition to the FLC Mid-Atlantic Region, participating organizations for this symposium include Johns Hopkins University and TEDCO.

For further information or if you have difficulty accessing the registration site, please contact John Emond at 301-384-2809 or johnlamaremond@aol.com. You may also contact INBT’s director of corporate partnerships, Tom Fekete at 410-516-8891 or tmfeke@jhu.edu.

A flyer and agenda for the event are below:

Maryland Technology Day Agenda

Maryland Technology Day Flyer

INBT engineers coax stem cells to diversify

Growing new blood vessels in the lab is a tough challenge, but a Johns Hopkins engineering team has solved a major stumbling block: how to prod stem cells to become two different types of tissue that are needed to build tiny networks of veins and arteries.

The team’s solution is detailed in an article appearing in the January 2013 print edition of the journal Cardiovascular Research. The article also was published recently in the journal’s online edition. The work is important because networks of new blood vessels, assembled in the lab for transplanting into patients, could be a boon to people whose circulatory systems have been damaged by heart disease, diabetes and other illnesses.

blood-vessel-3-72

Illustration by Maureen Wanjare

“That’s our long-term goal—to give doctors a new tool to treat patients who have problems in the pipelines that carry blood through their bodies,” said Sharon Gerecht, an assistant professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering who led the research team. “Finding out how to steer these stem cells into becoming critical building blocks to make these blood vessel networks is an important step.”

In the new research paper, the Gerecht team focused on vascular smooth muscle cells, which are found within the walls of blood vessels. Two types have been identified: synthetic smooth muscle cells, which migrate through the surrounding tissue, continue to divide and help support the newly formed blood vessels; and contractile smooth muscles cells, which remain in place, stabilize the growth of new blood vessels and help them maintain proper blood pressure.

To produce these smooth muscle cells, Gerecht’s lab has been experimenting with both National Institutes of Health-approved human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells. The induced pluripotent stem cells are adult cells that have been genetically reprogrammed to act like embryonic stem cells. Stem cells are used in this research because they possess the potential to transform into specific types of cells needed by particular organs within the body.

In an earlier study supervised by Gerecht, her team was able to coax stem cells to become a type of tissue that resembled smooth muscle cells but didn’t quite behave properly. In the new experiments, the researchers tried adding various concentrations of growth factor and serum to the previous cells. Growth factor is the “food’ that the cells consume; serum is a liquid component that contains blood cells.

“When we added more of the growth factor and serum, the stem cells turned into synthetic smooth muscle cells,” Gerecht said. “When we provided a much smaller amount of these materials, they became contractile smooth muscles cells.”

This ability to control the type of smooth muscle cells formed in the lab could be critical in developing new blood vessel networks, she said. “When we’re building a pipeline to carry blood, you need the contractile cells to provide structure and stability,” she added. “But in working with very small blood vessels, the migrating synthetic cells can be more useful.”

In cancer, small blood vessels are formed to nourish the growing tumor. The current work could also help researchers understand how blood vessels are stabilized in tumors, which could be useful in the treatment of cancer.

“We still have a lot more research to do before we can build complete new blood vessel networks in the lab,” Gerecht said, “but our progress in controlling the fate of these stem cells appears to be a big step in the right direction.”

In addition to her faculty appointment with Johns Hopkins’ Whiting School of Engineering, Gerecht is affiliated with the university’s Institute for NanoBioTechnology (INBT) and the Johns Hopkins Engineering in Oncology Center.

The lead author of the new Cardiovascular Research paper is Maureen Wanjare, a doctoral student in Gerecht’s lab who is supported both by the INBT, through a National Science Foundation Integrative Graduate Education and Research Traineeship, and by the NIH. Coauthors of the study are Gerecht and Frederick Kuo, who participated in the research as an undergraduate majoring in chemical and biomolecular engineering. The human induced pluripotent stem cells used in the study were provided by Linzhao Cheng, a hematology professor in the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.

This research was supported by an American Heart Association Scientist Development Grant and NIH grant R01HL107938.

Original press release can be found here.

 

Young, global entrepreneur to speak Dec. 12

The Center for Bioengineering Innovation and Design (CBID) hosts a guest speaker on  Wednesday, December 12, from 12:30 to 2 p.m. in Clark Hall 110 at the Johns Hopkins University Homewood campus.

Jodie Wu, founder/CEO, Global Cycle Solutions

Jodie Wu, founder and CEO of Global Cycle Solutions, will present: “Engineer to Entrepreneur: Starting a business in Africa at Age 22,: in which she will discuss the journey of Global Cycle Solutions, its history, its vision, its operations, and how it became what it is today.

In 2009, Wu at age 22, officially became a full-fledged entrepreneur, packing her bags and moving to Tanzania. Wu will talk about her journey from engineer to entrepreneur and give the insider story of taking her company Global Cycle Solutions, from the classroom to the field.

In addition, Wu will share her fantastic “failures”, the challenges of selling products to the world’s bottom billion, and her vision for the future now that her company has sold over 13,000 products across East Africa and is now operationally break even.

This talk is free and open to the Johns Hopkins community.

 

Molecular culprit linked to breast cancer spread

Johns Hopkins researchers have uncovered a protein “partner” commonly used by breast cancer cells to unlock genes needed for spreading the disease around the body. A report on the discovery, published Nov. 5 on the website of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, details how some tumors get the tools they need to metastasize.

“We’ve identified a protein that wasn’t known before to be involved in breast cancer progression,” says Gregg Semenza, M.D., Ph.D., the C. Michael Armstrong Professor of Medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and director of the Vascular Program at the university’s Institute for Cell Engineering. “The protein JMJD2C is the key that opens up a whole suite of genes needed for tumors to grow and metastasize, so it represents a potential target for cancer drug development.” Semenza also is associate director of the Johns Hopkins Physical Sciences-Oncology Center.

Semenza and his colleagues made their finding when they traced the activity of HIF-1, a protein known to switch on hundreds of genes involved in development, red blood cell production, and metabolism in normal cells. Previous studies had shown that HIF-1 could also be hijacked to switch on genes needed to make breast tumors more malignant.

Would-be tumor cells face a host of challenges as they make the transition from working with their host to working against it, such as the need to evade the immune system and to produce more cancer cells, explains Weibo Luo, Ph.D., an instructor in the Institute for Cell Engineering and Department of Biological Chemistry who led the project. All of these efforts require switching on the right genes for the job.

To learn more about how HIF-1 works, the researchers tested a range of human proteins to see whether they would interact with HIF-1. They then sifted through the 200 resulting hits, looking for proteins involved in chemical changes to sections of DNA that determine whether or not the genes they contain are available for use. “In order for HIF-1 to switch genes on, they have to be available, but many of the genes HIF-1 activates are normally locked down in mature cells,” explains Luo. “So we thought HIF-1 must have a partner that can do the unlocking.”

That partner turned out to be JMJD2C, Luo says. Delving deeper, the researchers found that HIF-1 switches on the JMJD2C gene, stimulating production of the protein. HIF-1’s presence also enables JMJD2C to bind to DNA at other HIF-1 target genes, and then loosen those DNA sections, enabling more HIF-1 to bind to the same sites and activate the target genes.

To test the implications of their discovery, the research team injected mice with breast cancer cells in which the JMJD2C protein was not produced. Tumors with depleted JMJD2C were much less likely to grow and metastasize to the lungs, confirming the protein’s role in breast cancer progression, says Luo.

“Active HIF proteins have been found in many types of tumors, so the implications of this finding go beyond breast cancer,” says Luo. “JMJD2C is both an important piece of the puzzle of how tumors metastasize, and a potential target for anti-cancer therapy.”

Other authors of the research report are Ryan Chang, Jun Zhong, Ph.D., and Akhilesh Pandey, M.D., Ph.D., all of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

This work was supported by grants from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (contracts N01-HV28180 and HHS-N268201000032C), and by funds from the Johns Hopkins Institute for Cell Engineering.

On the Web:

Johns Hopkins Physical Sciences-Oncology Center: http://psoc.inbt.jhu.edu/

Link to article: http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2012/10/31/1217394109.abstract

Semenza lab: http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/institute_cell_engineering/experts/gregg_semenza.html

Q&A with Semenza: http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/institute_cell_engineering/experts/meet_scientists/gregg_semenza.html

Original press release by Shawna WilliamsCatherine Kolf and Vanessa McMains

 

 

RNA nanotechnology and therapeutics conference registration opens

Mark your calendar. Those affiliated with Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology or Center for Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence may be interested to know that online registration is now open for the 2013 International Conference of RNA Nanotechnology and Therapeutics to be held in Lexington, KY on April 3-5, 2013 at the Crowne Plaza Hotel & Resorts.  The meeting is organized by Peixuan Guo (University of Kentucky CNPP), John Rossi (Beckman Research Institute), Bruce Shapiro (NCI), and Neocles Leontis (Bowling Green State University). Along with invited speakers, there will also be a poster session. Invited speakers are yet to be announced.

Program topics include:

  •  Biophysical and Single Molecule Approaches in RNA Nanotechnology
  • RNA Structure and Folding in Nanoparticles
  • RNA Computation and Modeling
  • RNA Nanoparticle Assembly
  • RNA Nanoparticles in Therapeutics
  • RNA Chemistry for Synthesis, Conjugation, & Labeling of Nanoparticles
  • RNA Systems Biology and Engineering
  • Exosomes and Extracellular RNA Communication

Additional details and registration information can be found at http://nanobio.uky.edu/RNA2013

 

Breast cancer patient advocates offer insight

Researchers are tapping into the first-hand knowledge of survivors of breast cancer through the cancer patient advocate program at Johns Hopkins Physical Sciences-Oncology Center (PS-OC).

“Breast cancer patients can provide valuable insight into the impact of therapies,” said Abigail Hielscher, a chemical and biomolecular engineering postdoctoral fellow in the Sharon Gerecht laboratory. Hielscher is helping to organize an effort to locate breast cancer survivors and patients, as well as those who work closely with them such as oncology nurses, to inform the efforts of researchers developing cancer diagnosis and treatments.

In addition to acting as a liaison between the population of breast cancer survivors and patients and the community of Johns Hopkins PS-OC scientists performing breast cancer-related research, patient advocates also are charged with telling the public and funding agencies about the latest breast cancer research being performed in PS-OC labs.

Likewise, researchers must communicate their findings via laboratory demonstrations and brief, non-technical talks to the breast cancer advocates.

“Survivors can facilitate communication between those directly affected by the disease and those working to treat or cure it,” Hielscher said. “The advocates, both patients and nurses, allow researchers to better understand and implement the needs of breast cancer patients in terms of new therapies and treatment strategies.”

Cancer patient advocates meet periodically with Johns Hopkins PS-OC researchers. Currently, PS-OC patient advocates are Mary Capano, MSN, RN, CBPN-IC and Nancy Cardwell.

If you or someone you know is a breast cancer survivor who would like to learn about the volunteer opportunity as a patient advocate contact Abigail Hielscher at ahielsc1@jhu.edu or via phone: 402-889-0283.

 

Cancer data stored in the cloud could improve treatments

These days, storing photos or music remotely in “the cloud”  has become common place. Now Johns Hopkins researchers are applying the concept to the storage of medical data in the hopes of predicting and improving cancer patient treatments and outcomes.

Images courtesy Denis Wirtz/JHU

“The long-range goal is to make these data available through the Internet to physicians who are diagnosing and treating cancer patients around the world,” said Denis Wirtz , associate director of the Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology and professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering. Using a $3.75 million grant over five years from the National Cancer Institute Common Fund Single Cell Analysis Program, Wirtz launched the program in October, with two colleagues from the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Anirban Maitra and Ralph Hruban.

Initially the database will focus on information from pancreatic cancer patient cell lines but will expand to other types of cancer, including ovarian.  Data gathered and stored will be at the single cell level, which Wirtz explains, provides better information for predicting how individual patients may respond to certain drugs. Drugs that work well for one patient may do nothing at all, or even be harmful, for another, Wirtz said. Understanding and predicting these outcomes before treatment is a step toward more personalized medicine, he added.

To read more about “cloud pathology,” go to the press release issued by John Hopkins University.

Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology

Johns Hopkins Engineering in Oncology Center

Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center