Landmark physical characterization of cancer cells completed

An enormous collaborative effort between a multitude of academic and research centers has characterized numerous physical and mechanical properties on one identical human cancer cell line. Their two-year cooperative study, published online in the April 26, 2013 journal Science Reports, reveals the persistent and agile nature of human cancer cells as compared to noncancerous cells. It also represents a major shift in the way scientific research can be accomplished.

Human breast cancer cells like these were used in the study. (Image created by Shyam Khatau/ Wirtz Lab)

Human breast cancer cells like these were used in the study. (Image created by Shyam Khatau/ Wirtz Lab)

The research, which was conducted by 12 federally funded Physical Sciences-Oncology Centers (PS-OC) sponsored by the National Cancer Institute, is a systematic comparison of metastatic human breast-cancer cells to non-metastatic breast cells that reveals dramatic differences between the two cell lines in their mechanics, migration, oxygen response, protein production and ability to stick to surfaces. They have also discovered new insights into how human cells make the transition from nonmalignant to metastatic, a process that is not well understood.

Denis Wirtz, a Johns Hopkins professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering with joint appointments in pathology and oncology who is the corresponding author on the study, remarked that the work adds a tremendous amount of information about the physical nature of cancer cells. “For the first time ever, scientists got together and have created THE phenotypic signature of cancer” Wirtz said. “Yes, it was just one metastatic cell line, and it will require validation with many other cell lines. But we now have an extremely rich signature containing many parameters that are distinct when looking at metastatic and nonmetastatic cells.”

Wirtz, who directs the Johns Hopkins Physical Sciences-Oncology Center, also noted the unique way in which this work was conducted: all centers used the same human cell line for their studies, which makes the quality of the results unparalleled. And, since human and not animal cells were used, the findings are immediately relevant to the development of drugs for the treatment of human disease.

“Cancer cells may nominally be derived from the same patient, but in actuality they will be quite different because cells drift genetically over just a few passages,” Wirtz said.  “This makes any measurement on them from different labs like comparing apples and oranges.” In this study, however, the genetic integrity of the cell lines were safeguarded by limiting the number times the original cell cultures could be regrown before they were discarded.

The nationwide PS-OC brings together researchers from physics, engineering, computer science, cancer biology and chemistry to solve problems in cancer, said Nastaran Zahir Kuhn, PS-OC program manager at the National Cancer Institute.

“The PS-OC program aims to bring physical sciences tools and perspectives into cancer research,” Kuhn said. “The results of this study demonstrate the utility of such an approach, particularly when studies are conducted in a standardized manner from the beginning.”

For the nationwide project, nearly 100 investigators from 20 institutions and laboratories conducted their experiments using the same two cell lines, reagents and protocols to assure that results could be compared. The experimental methods ranged from physical measurements of how the cells push on surrounding cells to measurements of gene and protein expression.

“Roughly 20 techniques were used to study the cell lines, enabling identification of a number of unique relationships between observations,” Kuhn said.

Wirtz added that it would have been logistically impossible for a single institution to employ all of these different techniques and to measure all of these different parameters on just one identical cell line. That means that this work accomplished in just two years what might have otherwise taken ten, he said.

The Johns Hopkins PS-OC made specific contributions to this work. Using particle-tracking microrheology, in which nanospheres are embedded in the cell’s cytoplasm and random cell movement is visually monitored, they measured the mechanical properties of cancerous versus noncancerous cells. They found that highly metastatic breast cancer cells were mechanically softer and more compliant than cells of less metastatic potential.

Using 3D cell culturing techniques, they analyzed the spontaneous migratory potential (that is, migration without the stimulus of any chemical signal) of cancerous versus noncancerous cells. They also analyzed the extracellular matrix molecules that were deposited by the two cell lines and found that cancerous cells deposited more hyaluronic acid (HA). The HA, in turn, affects motility, polarization and differentiation of cells.  Finally, the Hopkins team measured the level of expression of CD44, a cell surface receptor that recognizes HA, and found that metastatic cells express more CD44.

The next steps, Wirtz said, would be to validate these results using other metastatic cell lines.  To read the paper, which is published in an open access journal, follow this link: http://www.nature.com/srep/2013/130422/srep01449/full/srep01449.html

Excerpts from original press release by Princeton science writer Morgan Kelly were used.

 

 

 

 

Recent publications from the Johns Hopkins Physical Sciences-Oncology Center

Johns Hopkins Physical Sciences-Oncology Center has had a productive quarter publishing from February to May 2013. Here are some of the most recent publications in support or the center’s core research projects, including a huge collaborative work drawing on the knowledge and research findings of the entire PS-OC network.

Screen Shot 2013-05-15 at 4.27.37 PMThat paper, A physical sciences network characterization of non-tumorigenic and metastatic cells, was the work of 95 authors from all 12 of the National Cancer Institute’s PS-OC  program centers. JHU’s PS-OC director Denis Wirtz, the Theophilus H. Smoot Professor in the Johns Hopkins Department of Chemical and Ciomolecular Engineering, is the corresponding author on this massive effort. We will be discussing the findings of that paper in a future post here on the PS-OC website. Until then, here is a link to that network paper and 13 other recent publications from the Johns Hopkins PS-OC.

  • A physical sciences network characterization of non-tumorigenic and metastatic cells.Physical Sciences – Oncology Centers Network, Agus DB, Alexander JF, Arap W,Ashili S, Aslan JE, Austin RH, Backman V, Bethel KJ, Bonneau R, Chen WC,Chen-Tanyolac C, Choi NC, Curley SA, Dallas M, Damania D, Davies PC, Decuzzi P,Dickinson L, Estevez-Salmeron L, Estrella V, Ferrari M, Fischbach C, Foo J,Fraley SI, Frantz C, Fuhrmann A, Gascard P, Gatenby RA, Geng Y, Gerecht S,Gillies RJ, Godin B, Grady WM, Greenfield A, Hemphill C, Hempstead BL, HielscherA, Hillis WD, Holland EC, Ibrahim-Hashim A, Jacks T, Johnson RH, Joo A, Katz JE,Kelbauskas L, Kesselman C, King MR, Konstantopoulos K, Kraning-Rush CM, Kuhn P,Kung K, Kwee B, Lakins JN, Lambert G, Liao D, Licht JD, Liphardt JT, Liu L, LloydMC, Lyubimova A, Mallick P, Marko J, McCarty OJ, Meldrum DR, Michor F,Mumenthaler SM, Nandakumar V, O’Halloran TV, Oh S, Pasqualini R, Paszek MJ,Philips KG, Poultney CS, Rana K, Reinhart-King CA, Ros R, Semenza GL, Senechal P,Shuler ML, Srinivasan S, Staunton JR, Stypula Y, Subramanian H, Tlsty TD, TormoenGW, Tseng Y, van Oudenaarden A, Verbridge SS, Wan JC, Weaver VM, Widom J, Will C, Wirtz D, Wojtkowiak J, Wu PH.  Sci Rep. 2013 Apr 25;3:1449. doi:10.1038/srep01449. PubMed PMID: 23618955; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3636513. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23618955
  • Procollagen Lysyl Hydroxylase 2 Is Essential for Hypoxia-Induced Breast Cancer Metastasis. Gilkes DM, Bajpai S, Wong CC, Chaturvedi P, Hubbi ME, Wirtz D, Semenza GL.Mol Cancer Res. 2013 May 7. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 23378577. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23378577
  • Predicting how cells spread and migrate: Focal adhesion size does matter. Kim DH, Wirtz D. Cell Adh Migr. 2013 Apr 29;7(3). [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 23628962. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23628962
  • Hypoxia-inducible Factor 1 (HIF-1) Promotes Extracellular Matrix Remodeling under Hypoxic Conditions by Inducing P4HA1, P4HA2, and PLOD2 Expression in Fibroblasts. Gilkes DM, Bajpai S, Chaturvedi P, Wirtz D, Semenza GL. J Biol   Chem. 2013 Apr 12;288(15):10819-29. doi: 10.1074/jbc.M112.442939. Epub 2013 Feb 19. PubMed PMID: 23423382; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3624462. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23423382
  • Perivascular cells in blood vessel regeneration. Wanjare M, Kusuma S, Gerecht S. Biotechnol J. 2013 Apr;8(4):434-47. doi: 10.1002/biot.201200199. PubMed PMID: 23554249. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23554249
  • Focal adhesion size uniquely predicts cell migration. Kim DH, Wirtz D. FASEB J. 2013 Apr;27(4):1351-61. doi: 10.1096/fj.12-220160. Epub 2012 Dec 19. PubMed PMID: 23254340; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3606534. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23254340
  • Notch4-dependent Antagonism of Canonical TGFβ1  Signaling Defines Unique Temporal Fluctuations of SMAD3 Activity in Sheared Proximal Tubular Epithelial Cells. Grabias BM, Konstantopoulos K. Am J Physiol Renal Physiol. 2013 Apr 10. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 23576639. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23576639
  • Integration and regression of implanted engineered human vascular networks during deep wound healing. Hanjaya-Putra D, Shen YI, Wilson A, Fox-Talbot K, Khetan S, Burdick JA, Steenbergen C, Gerecht S. Stem Cells Transl Med. 2013 Apr;2(4):297-306. doi: 10.5966/sctm.2012-0111. Epub 2013 Mar 13. PubMed PMID: 23486832. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23486832
  • Collagen Prolyl Hydroxylases are Essential for Breast Cancer Metastasis. Gilkes DM, Chaturvedi P, Bajpai S, Wong CC, Wei H, Pitcairn S, Hubbi ME, Wirtz D, Semenza GL. Cancer Res. 2013 Mar 28. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 23539444. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23539444
  • Simultaneously defining cell phenotypes, cell cycle, and chromatin modifications at single-cell resolution.Chambliss AB, Wu PH, Chen WC, Sun SX, Wirtz D.FASEB J. 2013 Mar 28. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 23538711.http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23538711
  • Interstitial friction greatly impacts membrane mechanics. Wirtz D. Biophys J.2013 Mar 19;104(6):1217-8. doi: 10.1016/j.bpj.2013.02.003. Epub 2013 Mar 19.PubMed PMID: 23528079; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3602747.http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23528079
  • Functional interplay between the cell cycle and cell phenotypes. Chen WC, Wu PH, Phillip JM, Khatau SB, Choi JM, Dallas MR, Konstantopoulos K,Sun SX, Lee JS, Hodzic D, Wirtz D.Integr Biol (Camb). 2013 Mar;5(3):523-34. doi:10.1039/c2ib20246h. PubMed PMID: 23319145 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23319145
  • High-throughput secretomic analysis of single cells to assess functional cellular heterogeneity. Lu Y, Chen JJ, Mu L, Xue Q, Wu Y, Wu PH, Li J, Vortmeyer AO, Miller-Jensen K, Wirtz D, Fan R. Anal Chem. 2013 Feb 19;85(4):2548-56. doi:10.1021/ac400082e. Epub 2013 Feb 1. PubMed PMID: 23339603; PubMed Central PMCID:  PMC3589817.http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23339603\

 

Microscopic grippers used successfully in animal biopsies

Tiny, untethered microscale grippers have been successfully used to perform tissue biopsies in live animals, a study in the journal Gastroenterology reports. Researchers affiliated with the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Whiting School of Engineering and Institute for NanoBiotechnology developed the self-assembling microgrippers, called mu-grippers. The star-shaped devices use the animal’s own body heat to trigger them to clamp down around tissue to grab a sample like a tiny hand. Because the grippers are magnetic, they can later be retrieved for a minimally invasive procedure.

Dozens of dust-sized surgical mu- grippers in a vial. (Photo by  Evin Gultepe, Gracias Lab, Johns Hopkins University)

Dozens of dust-sized surgical mu- grippers in a vial. (Photo by Evin Gultepe, Gracias Lab, Johns Hopkins University)

David Gracias, the principal investigator for the study and associate professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering, was quoted in a Johns Hopkins press release about the work: “This is the first time that anyone has used a sub-millimeter-sized device — the size of a dust particle — to conduct a biopsy in a live animal … That’s a significant accomplishment. And because we can send the grippers in through natural orifices, it is an important advance in minimally invasive treatment and a step toward the ultimate goal of making surgical procedures noninvasive.”

Read more here.

 

Regenerative medicine theme of science-writer bootcamp

Screen Shot 2013-04-01 at 3.19.05 PMJohns Hopkins invites you to the fifth annual science-writer boot camp. This year’s topic will be Regenerative Medicine. Join Johns Hopkins experts in regenerative medicine to learn the latest in stem cell research, tissue regeneration and organ transplantation.

Three of the 11 presenters are affiliated faculty members of the Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology. This event is sponsored by the Johns Hopkins Institute for Basic Biomedical Sciences.  There is no cost but reservations are required. Working press as well as freelance writers are invited to attend.

WHAT: Body Building: Recent Advances in Regenerative Medicine

WHEN: Monday, April 29, 2011, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. (lunch will be provided)

WHERE: Bernstein-Offit Building, room LL7, Johns Hopkins SAIS Campus, 1717 Massachusetts Ave., NW, Washington, D.C. 20036

RSVP: Vanessa McMains at vmcmain1@jhmi.edu or 410-502-9410 by April 19

Confirmed speakers:

  • Gerald Brandacher, M.D. Scientific Director, Composite Tissue Allotransplantation (Reconstructive Transplant) Program
  • Robert Brodsky, M.D. Director, Division of Hematology
  • Jeff Bulte, Ph.D. Director, Cellular Imaging Section, Institute for Cell Engineering (INBT affiliated faculty)
  • Mark Donowitz, M.D. Director, Center for Epithelial Disorders; Director, Conte GI Core Research Center
  • Gary Gerstenblith, M.D. Professor, Medicine
  • Warren Grayson, Ph.D. Assistant Professor, Biomedical Engineering (INBT affiliated faculty)
  • Jun Liu, Ph.D. Professor, Pharmacology and Molecular Sciences
  • Erika Matunis, Ph.D. Associate Professor, Cell Biology
  • Guo-li Ming, M.D., Ph.D. Professor, Neurology and member of the Institute for Cell Engineering (INBT affiliated faculty)
  • Ronald Schnaar, Ph.D. Professor, Pharmacology and Molecular Sciences; Director, Lung Inflammatory Disease Program of Excellence in Glycoscience

We look forward to seeing you on April 29!

Download the color flyer here.

 

Wenk lecture on tech and public policy slated for May 2

The annual Carolyn and Edward Wenk Jr. Lecture in Technology and Public Policy will be held Thursday, May 2, 3:30 in the Mason Hall Auditorium on the Johns Hopkins University Homewood campus.

Christopher Welch

Christopher Welch

This year’s theme is “How Technological Innovation Enables the Development of Sustainable Solutions to 21st Century Healthcare Problems.” The guest speaker is Christopher J. Welch Merck Research Laboratories, Merck & Co., Inc., Rahway, NJ. Welch is Science Lead for Analytical Chemistry within the Process and Analytical Chemistry area at Merck Research Laboratories in Rahway, NJ. He also co-chairs the New Technologies Review and Licensing Committee, the organization that oversees identification, acquisition and evaluation of new technologies of potential value to Merck Research Laboratories.

Welch will address the daunting challenge facing scientists and engineers today of providing sustainable healthcare solutions to the world’s population in the 21st century. Several examples of the application of new technologies to the development of today’s medicines will be highlighted, with an explanation of how multiple layers of complex technologies are often involved in the discovery, development and manufacturing of a seemingly simple pill or tablet. In keeping with the spirit of the Wenk lecture, the important role of conscientious scientific citizenship in engaging the scientific community, steering the direction of scientific innovation, and contributing to the creation, maintenance and repair of a global scientific infrastructure will also be discussed.

This year’s Wenk lecture is co-sponsored by Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology and the Whiting School of Engineering Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering.

 

Spring nano-bio mini-symposium set for April 3

Catch up on the latest research happening in Johns Hopkins University labs working in nanobiotechnology, the physics of cancer and cancer nanotech at INBT’s spring mini-symposium Wednesday, April 3 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. in Leverings’s Great Hall on the Homewood campus.

AT AT GLANCE- INBT new signSMALL

Mini-symposiums are organized in the spring and fall by student leaders in the Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology, the Engineering in Oncology Center and the Center of Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence. They are a means of showcasing current work, learning from guest speakers and facilitating communication and collaboration among affiliated laboratories. This event is open to the entire Johns Hopkins Community. Save the date!

The agenda is as follows:

  • 9:00 am ~ 9:10 am Welcome speech Denis Wirtz, PhD, Director of Johns Hopkins Physical Science Oncology Center (PS-OC)
  • 9:10 am ~ 9:40 am “Role of ion channels and aquaporins in cancer cell migration in confined microenvironments” Kimberly M. Stroka, PhD, Postdoc fellow (PS-OC) Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Johns Hopkins University
  • 9:40 am ~ 10:10 am “TBD” Helena Zec, Graduate student (CCNE) Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University
  • 10:10 am ~ 10:40 am “Single-cell protein profiling to study cancer cell heterogeneity” Jonathan Chen, Graduate student (PS-OC) Department of Biomedical Engineering, Yale University
  • 10:40 am ~ 11:30 am “Synthetic cell biology: total synthesis of cellular functions” Takanari Inoue, PhD, Assistant professor Department of Cell Biology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
  • 11:30 am ~ 11:40 am Coffee Break
  • 11:40 am ~ 12:10 pm “TBD” Yu-Ja Huang, Graduate student (PS-OC) Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University
  • 12:10 pm ~ 1:00 pm “Infections, Chronic Inflammation, and Prostate Cancer” Karen Sandell Sfanos, PhD, Assistant professor Department of Pathology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
  • 1:00 pm ~ 1:30 pm “Development of CEST liposomes for monitoring nanoparticle-based cancer therapies using MRI” Tao Yu, Graduate student (CCNE) Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University

INBT Spring mini-symposium flyer

INBT-Shirt Design Contest

You are cordially invited to submit a design for the INBT-Shirt Design Contest!

Here are the rules:

1) You need to use the Gildan Ultra Cotton T-Shirt on Custom Ink to design your shirt. You can chose any color scheme you like. Here’s a link to the page.

2) You need to use the inbt logo somewhere on the tshirt. I’ve attached two inbt logos that can be uploaded while you design.

Besides that the sky is the limit in terms of your design. The submission deadline is Friday, March 1st. Please submit all designs to me. My email is scmjhu@gmail.com.

A panel consisting of various members from the INBT will judge all the tshirt designs and chose the best one. The undergrad who submits the best design will receive a $25 gift card!!

At the end of the contest, if there is an outstanding submission, all INBT undergraduate researchers will receive free tshirts!! So start designing, and may the odds be ever in your favor.

Please let me know if you have any questions.

Good luck,

Shaun McGovern

Links to the logos are below.

inbt-logo

inbt-undergrad-research-shirt-3

jhu

 

Self-assembling drug molecules could fight cancer

A popular method of targeted drug delivery for anti-cancer drugs involves doping another material with the desired pharmaceutical to obtain better targeting efficiency to tumor sites. The problem with this method, researchers have discovered, is that the quantity of drug payload per delivery unit can vary widely and that the materials used for delivery can have toxic side effects.

But what if you could turn the drug molecule itself into a nanoscale delivery system, cutting out the middleman completely?

TEM image of nanotubes formed by self-assembly of an anticancer drug amphiphile. These nanotubes possess a fixed drug loading of 38% (w/w). Image from Cui Lab.

TEM image of nanotubes formed by self-assembly of an anticancer drug amphiphile. These nanotubes possess a fixed drug loading of 38% (w/w). Image from Cui Lab.

Using the process of molecular self-assembly, that is what Honggang Cui, an assistant professor in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at Johns Hopkins University, is attempting to do. His efforts have netted him the prestigious Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Award from the National Science Foundation. Cui, an affiliated faculty member of the Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology, will receive the $500,000 award over five years.

Cui explained that a current method of delivering anti-cancer drugs is to enclose them in a nanoscale carrier made of natural or synthetic materials, but this method presents several challenges. “The amount of drug loaded per carrier is very much limited and varies from batch to batch. Even in the same batch, there is a drug loading variation from carrier to carrier. Additionally, the carrier material itself may have toxic side effects,” he said.

Cui’s research seeks to eliminate the need for the carrier by coaxing the drug molecules themselves to form their own carrier through the process of self-assembly. His team is developing new molecular engineering strategies to assemble anti-cancer drugs into supramolecular nanostructures.

“Such supramolecules could carry as much as 100 percent of the drug, would possess a fixed amount of drug per nanostructure and would minimize the potential toxicity of the carrier,” Cui said.

To learn more about research in the Cui lab go to http://www.jhu.edu/cui/

 

Nanotech checks on transplanted cell survival

Researchers at Johns Hopkins are using nanotechnology to track the survival and location of transplanted cells. The device, based on nanoscale ph sensors and imaging via magnetic resonance, could help improve outcomes from cell replacement therapies used for conditions such as liver disease or type 1 diabetes.

Cartoon showing nanoscale probe used to detect pH change caused by death of transplanted cell. (McMahon/Nature Materials)

Cartoon showing nanoscale probe used to detect pH change caused by death of transplanted cell. (McMahon/Nature Materials)

“This technology has the potential to turn the human body into less of a black box and tell us if transplanted cells are still alive,” says Mike McMahon, Ph.D., an associate professor of radiology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine principal investigator on the study. “That information will be invaluable in fine-tuning therapies.”

Transplanted cells often fall victim to assault from the body’s immune system, which sees the news cells as foreign invaders. Says McMahon,  “once you put the cells in, you really have no idea how long they survive.”

When cells die there is a change in the acidity nearby. Using this fact, the researchers developed a nanoparticle sensor that could both sense the change in pH and be detected via MRI. The team tested the sensors on mice and found they they were able to track the location of surviving transplanted cells and determine the proportion that had survived.

“It was exciting to see that this works so well in a living body,” says research fellow Kannie Chan, Ph.D., the lead author on the study, which was published in Nature Materials. This should take a lot of the guesswork out of cell transplantation by letting doctors see whether the cells survive, and if not, when they die,” Chan says. “That way they may be able to figure out what’s killing the cells, and how to prevent it.”

Chan works in the laboratory of Jeff Bulte, Ph.D., the director of cellular imaging at Johns Hopkins’ Institute for Cell Engineering. Bulte and McMahon collaborated on the study. Additional authors include Guanshu Liu, Xiaolei Song, Heechul Kim, Tao Yu, Dian R. Arifin, Assaf A. Gilad, Justin Hanes, Piotr Walczak and Peter C. M. van Zijl, all of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. McMahan, Bulte, Gilad, Hanes and van Zijl are all affiliated faculty members of Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology.

Funding for this study was provided by the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (grant numbers R01 EB012590, EB015031, EB015032 and EB007825).

Follow this link to read the paper, MRI-detectable pH nanosensors incorporated into hydrogels for in vivo sensing of transplanted-cell viability, in Nature Materials online http://www.nature.com/nmat/journal/vaop/ncurrent/abs/nmat3525.html

FLC event focuses on Maryland technology

Screen Shot 2013-02-04 at 10.59.42 AMMaryland Technology Past, Present and Future is the topic of a day-long symposium, February 28 at the National Electronics Museum hosted by the Federal Laboratory Consortium Mid-Atlantic Region.

The FLC is a national organization chartered by Congress to foster technology transfer from federal research laboratories and field centers, to other federal agencies; state and local government; academia and the private sector. One of the regional consortium’s efforts has been to conduct a series of one-day forums that highlight specific areas of technology and encourage collaboration and partnership development with federal labs.

Registration is $25 and includes refreshments and lunch. Registration deadline is February 15 and can be made online at this link.

The National Electronics Museum is located at 1745 West Nursery Road in Linthicum, Md. The symposium begins with registration at 8:15 a.m. and adjourns at 3:45 p.m.

In addition to the presentations, the day will offer the opportunity to meet scientists from the regions National Labs such as NASA, NIST, NIH and Goddard as well as representatives of local industry. In addition to the FLC Mid-Atlantic Region, participating organizations for this symposium include Johns Hopkins University and TEDCO.

For further information or if you have difficulty accessing the registration site, please contact John Emond at 301-384-2809 or johnlamaremond@aol.com. You may also contact INBT’s director of corporate partnerships, Tom Fekete at 410-516-8891 or tmfeke@jhu.edu.

A flyer and agenda for the event are below:

Maryland Technology Day Agenda

Maryland Technology Day Flyer