Engineering Vascularization – 2017 Nano-Bio Symposium

2017-inbt-symposium-posterEngineering Vascularization is the topic of the eleventh Johns Hopkins Nano-Bio Symposium. An amazing line-up of speakers will reveal what it’s like to explore the creation of blood vessel systems in lab-grown tissue. The presenters are:

  • Shahin Rafii, Cornell University
    Angiocrine Functions of Organotypic Endothelium in Regeneration and Tumorigenesis
  • David Cheresh, UCSD
    Reprogramming the Endothelium, an Initial Step in the Process of Angiogenesis
  • David Kaplan, Tufts
    Strategies for Vascularization of Biomaterial Systems for Tissue Regeneration
  • Narutoshi Hibino, JHU
    Challenge to Cardiovascular Disease Using 3D Printing and Tissue Engineering
  • Zaver Bhujwalla, JHU
    Imaging to Navigate the Tumor Microenvironment
  • Warren Grayson, JHU
    Platform Technologies for Engineering Vascularized Tissue Grafts

The day continues with a bustling poster session on a wide range of research topics. Students and researchers working in all aspects of nanobiotechnology are invited to participate.

The event, jointly orgazined by INBT and the Physical Sciences-Oncology Center, is free and open to the Johns Hopkins University community and select other academic institutions. A registration fee may apply to other attendees.

Visit http://inbt.jhu.edu/symposium to learn more.

May 5, 2017 from 9AM to 1230PM in the Owens auditorium at the Johns Hopkins Medical Campus
followed by a poster session from 130PM to 330PM.

Symposium – New Approaches to Metabolomics Research

The ICTR Drugs/Biologics/Vaccines Devices Translational Research Community and the Center for Metabolomics Analysis are hosting a symposium on March 14 from 9:30am-12:00pm in Owens Auditorium at the Koch Cancer Research Building, 1550 Orleans St.  Event check-in and coffee service will begin at 9:00am. The program will run 9:30am-12:00pm. Upon exciting the event, attendees may pick up a boxed lunch and meet with core leaders and other experts. All faculty and staff are encouraged to attend.

Speakers will address the following topic areas:

  • Resources available on campus: The Metabolomics Program as part of ICTR- supported labs.
  • Feasibility, design, and costs of projects using metabolomics technologies (including mass spec and NMR- based metabolomics).
  • Metabolic approaches based on specific research projects/questions ranging from simple assays to high-throughput approaches such as global metabolic profiling and stable isotope-13C, 15N-labeled on a wide variety of sample types

Keynote speakers include Charles Burant, MD, PhD director of the University of Michigan Nutrition Obesity Research Center (P30) and the Michigan Regional Comprehensive Metabolomics Resource core (U24) and Children’s Health Exposure Analytical Resource Untargeted Analysis Core (R24), and Gary Siuzdak, PhD, director of the Scripps Center for Metabolomics and faculty guest at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

The event is free and registration is required. To RSVP visit: https://metabolomicsresearchmarch14.eventbrite.com/

 

To learn more about the event download the attached flyer.

 

To receive information about similar events and funding opportunities, contact Kelly Crowley (kelly.crowley@jhmi.edu).

INBT “How-To” Tutorials start today with Adobe Illustrator for Scientist and Engineers

The INBT director of web and animation is presenting a hands-on tutorial on Adobe Illustrator.  Undergraduates, graduates and postdocs will learn techniques to enhance skills in Adobe.

 

Podcast: Artificial blood vessel visualizes cancer cell journey

Researchers from Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology are visualizing many of the steps involved in how cancer cells break free from tumors and travel through the blood stream, potentially on their way to distant organs.  Using an artificial blood vessel developed in the laboratory of Peter Searson, INBT director and professor of materials science and engineering, scientists are looking more closely into the complex journey of the cancer cell.

Figure 1. 3D projection of a confocal z-stack shows human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) forming a functional vessel immunofluorescently stained for PECAM-1 (green) and nuclei (blue).

Figure 1. 3D projection of a confocal z-stack shows human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) forming a functional vessel immunofluorescently stained for PECAM-1 (green) and nuclei (blue). (Wong/Searson Lab)

INBT’s science writer, Mary Spiro, interviewed device developer Andrew Wong, a doctoral student Searson’s  lab, for the NanoByte Podcast. Wong is an INBT training grant student. Listen to NANOBYTE #101 at this link.

Wong describes the transparent device, which is made up of a cylindrical channel lined with human endothelial cells and housed within a gel made of collagen, the body’s structural protein that supports living tissues. A small clump of metastatic breast cancer cells is seeded in the gel near the vessel while a nutrient rich fluid was pumped through the channel to simulate blood flow. By adding fluorescent tags the breast cancer cells, the researchers were able to track the cells’ paths over multiple days under a microscope.

VIDEO: Watch how a cancer cell approaches the artificial blood vessel, balls up and then forces its way through the endothelial cells and into the streaming fluids within the channel of the device. (Video by Searson Lab)

The lab-made device allows researchers to visualize how “a single cancer cell degrades the matrix and creates a tunnel that allows it to travel to the vessel wall,” says Wong. “The cell then balls up, and after a few days, exerts a force that disrupts the endothelial cells. It is then swept away by the flow. “

Wong said his next goal will be to use the artificial blood vessel to investigate different cancer treatment strategies, such as chemotherapeutic drugs, to find ways to improve the targeting of drug-resistant tumors.

Results of their experiments with this device were published in the journal Cancer Research in September.

Andrew Wong (left) and Peter Searson. (Photo by Will Kirk/Homewood Photography)

Andrew Wong (left) and Peter Searson. (Photo by Will Kirk/Homewood Photography)

Check out this gallery of images from the Searson Lab. The captions are as follows:
Figure 1. 3D projection of a confocal z-stack shows human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) forming a functional vessel immunofluorescently stained for PECAM-1 (green) and nuclei (blue).
Figure 2. 3D projection of a confocal z-stack shows human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) forming a vessel with dual-labeled MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells on the periphery.
Figure 3. Phase-contrast and fluorescence overlays depicting a functional vessel comprised of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) with dual-labeled MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells on the periphery (green in the nucleus, red in the cytoplasm).

For all press inquiries regarding INBT, its faculty and programs, contact Mary Spiro, mspiro@jhu.edu or 410-516-4802.

 

PURA Information Session

Our first PURA info session will take place in Shaffer 300 next Wednesday (Sept 17) at 7:00 pm. We plan to give a presentation on the basics of the PURA and answer any questions potential applicants might have.

This session is hosted by INBT Undergraduate Research Group.

LinkedIn Advice from the experts

INBT undergraduates attended a session, giving expert advice on how to build an effective profile and how to use LinkedIn for visibility, networking, and finding your next step.  The presenter discusses the latest features, and find connections you didn’t even know about. The presenter is Donna Vogel, MD, PhD, Professional Development Office (JHMI) Director and LinkedIn member since 2003.

 

For Undergraduates: Fulbright Grant Info Session

Monday, May 5: Fulbright Grant Info Session

Final joint session: Undergrads with strong academic records can learn about the Fulbright Academic/Arts Grant and the Fulbright English Teaching Assistantship (ETA) Grant: 2 to 3 p.m., Monday, May 5, in 387 Garland Hall.

DEADLINE EXTENDED: Applications accepted for INBT IRES until Feb 14

If you have been curious to discover what laboratory work is like in another country, now is your chance to apply for one of INBT’s coveted positions as an international undergraduate researcher. Applications are now being accepted for our National Science Foundation funded International Research Experience for Undergraduates in Leuven, Belgium with IMEC.  The deadline for applications is February 14, 2014. The opportunities are for Johns Hopkins University students.

IMEC clean roomIMEC boasts world-class micro- and nano-fabrication facilities and a campus with more than 1,000 researchers from around the globe who are collaborating on leading-edge projects. Belgium boasts waffles, beer and chocolate. Really, you can’t go wrong here.

INBT international research internships focus on a project of mutual interest to Johns Hopkins faculty and to IMEC investigators. INBT has a long-standing research collaboration agreement with IMEC, one of the world’s leading research organizations focusing on silicon nanotechnology headquartered in Leuven, Belgium. Since 2009, students, both undergraduates and postgraduates, from INBT labs have had the opportunity to participate in internships at IMEC’s state-of-the-art research facility. These internships have the dual purpose of providing international research experience for students as well as furthering the research interests of both Hopkins and IMEC.

To read about some of the previous experiences of our IRES participates, visit INBT’s Summer at IMEC blog here.

To apply, send the following items to Tom Fekete, INBT’s director of corporate partnerships, before Feb. 1: tfekete1@jhu.edu.

  • CV/Resume
  • Research Statement
  • Letter of Recommendation

If you are not sure what you would like to work on, Tom has a list of possible research areas that you can inquire about as well. If you have any questions, please feel free to contact Tom.  If he is unavailable, please contact Ashanti Edwards, INBT’s Academic Program Administrator at ashanti@jhu.edu.

Official INBT undergraduate organization formed

students-chattingUndergraduate students affiliated with Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology has now become an official university group. The group’s goal is to create an environment for undergraduate researchers to get to know people, from different labs within INBT. The group will host events that will help students learn more about life after college as well as give members a chance to network and get to know one another.

To join the group, follow this link.

INBT recruiting for multiple training programs

INBT is currently recruiting for multiple programs.  Check out the links below for more information.