REU Profile: making connections in metastasis

Kelcee Everette was part of Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology’s summer research experience for undergraduates. She blogged about her experience below:

My name is Kelcee Everette and I am a rising sophomore at Harvard University. During the summer, I worked in the Denis Wirtz Lab in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, where I characterized invasive breast cancer cell movement and compared those characterizations to the cell’s ability to metastasize in both 3D gels and on 2D substrates.

Kelcee Everette

Kelcee Everette

This project for me was especially exciting because I had never conducted research before. I learned a lot of skills that will be extremely valuable to me as I pursue my PhD.

The entire research experience was completely new to me, but my mentor, PI, and labmates were super helpful in teaching me the techniques I’d need to conduct my experiments.  Some of the skills I acquired included advanced microscopy, how to culture cells, and how create 3D collagen matrices, along with learning new programs like ImageJ and Metamorph.

I also learned a lot about the biological nature of cancer cells. The most interesting thing I learned, and the cornerstone of my project, was that cancer cells that are genetically identical can have vastly different motility profiles. The old saying “you learn something new every day” was a very applicable statement to my time in the lab.

Outside of the lab, my fellow interns and I had fun exploring the Inner Harbor, going to a food truck festival and a few other local and cultural festivals, and exploring local eateries and shopping centers. My experience this summer has been truly enjoyable both in and out of the lab, and I feel as if I have made great connections within the scientific community in just ten short weeks.

All press inquiries about this program or about INBT in general should be directed to Mary Spiro, INBT’s science writer and media relations director at mspiroATjhu.edu.

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