REU Profile: Hydrogels and stem cells

FranklynHall

Franklyn Hall

Franklyn Hall is a rising junior at Mississippi State University where he is studying Chemical Engineering with a Biomolecular Concentration. He is spending the summer in the chemical and biomolecular engineering laboratory of Sharon Gerecht as part of the Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology Research Experience for Undergraduates program (INBT REU).

Franklyn wanted to write about his experience thus far at Johns Hopkins in the INBT REU program in a blog post as follows:

This summer at the INBT REU has been an amazing experience that has allowed me to investigate interesting research topics such as hydrogels and stem cell growth. This experience has also given me the opportunity to learn more about the JHU community and the life of a graduate student.

My research is mainly focused on the characterization of the optimal conditions for vascular regeneration and growth within hydrogels. Hydrogels are unique 3-D environments that mimic in-vivo cell growth and allow researchers to study and adjust growth conditions, patterns, and cell interactions. These 3-D growth environments not only improve our understanding of stem cells, but they have applications in wound healing and tissue regeneration. I am specifically investigating hypoxia in hydrogels or the state of having low oxygen availability within the hydrogel. One of my research goals is to find the optimal hypoxic conditions and the effect of oxygen gradients within the hydrogel on cell growth and development. I have enjoyed learning how to make the hydrogel polymers, culture and stain cells, and look forward to producing results soon.

Outside of the laboratory I have had the opportunity to play on the departmental softball team with my graduate student mentor. It is common for graduate students to play different sports in the evening to socialize and have fun outside of the laboratory. During our semiweekly games, I have been able to talk to Masters, MD, and MD/PhD. students to learn about their graduate study experiences and future goals.  We have also had the opportunity to go out to eat and go to different events around Baltimore.

Graduate studies and research may be challenging. However, with people like the ones I have met, the support is there for you to persevere and make your mark on the scientific community.

All press inquiries about this program or about INBT in general should be directed to Mary Spiro, INBT’s science writer and media relations director at mspiroATjhu.edu.

 

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