Nanodevices built with DNA origami

Did you know DNA could be used for origami?

Not actual DNA origami.

Not actual DNA origami.

The precise control and organization of nanoscale devices has shown a great potential for ultimately creating “nano-devices” that can perform nanoscale biological measurements, deliver medicine in vivo, among many other applications. A recent article from Carlos E. Castro and colleauges from The Ohio State University demonstrates the use of DNA origami with programmable complex and reversible 1D, 2D and 3D motions.

By varying the DNA origami design, they were able to observe different mechanisms for the DNA origami’s 3D motion such as the crank-slider and four bar mechanism. The research team mainly utilized transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to follow the morphology changes as the origami moves.

DNAUsing a fluorescence quenching assay (attaching a fluorescent label on one arm and a quencher on the other), they have characterized the timescale of DNA origami motion. Overall, their group sees this technology as a “foundation for developing and characterizing a library of tunable DNA origami kinematic joints and using them in more complex controllable mechanisms similar to macroscopic machines, such as manipulators to control chemical reactions, transport biomolecules, or assemble nanoscale components in real time.”

 

Shown below are some of the videos showing the motions of the DNA origami that they have reported:

About the author: Herdeline Ann M. Ardoña is a third year graduate student at Johns Hopkins University Department of Chemistry, currently working in chemistry professor J.D. Tovar’s lab and co-advised by professor Hai-Quan Mao, in materials science and engineering.

Reference: Programmable motion of DNA origami mechanisms. (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A., 2015, 112, 713-718)

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