Sciencescape rescues researchers from never-ending flow of published data

Screen Shot 2014-12-03 at 1.28.38 PMI like to listen to as much new music as I can. But I realized long ago that there would never be enough hours in the day or days in my lifetime to sift through all the new stuff to discover cool new tunes, even in the genres I preferred.

Scientists and engineers have similar problems staying current with research relevant to their disciplines. A report published in November 2012 by the International Association of Scientific, Technical and Medical Publishers estimated that 1.8 million papers are published in 28,000 academic journals every year. That’s a lot of data and a lot of discussion about that data. Another study published in 2007, reported that very little of this research is ever read by anyone. Only a wee bit of it is going to help you finish your dissertation, refine your protocol or provide the foundations to your next big breakthrough.

Thankfully some smart folks at Sciencescape.org have figured out a nifty way for you to sift through this mountain of virtual paper. Sciencescape pulls in data from available online journal databases, like PubMed, Google Scholar and many more going back to 1880. Using your chosen criteria, Sciencescape creates sort of a news feed of published research that may be important for you. You can use search criteria such as author, topic, journal name, and publication date. You can even keep track of research coming out of a specific lab or follow authors as you would follow people on Twitter.  Sciencescape uses Eigenfactor metrics, which pinpoints papers that are highly cited and by high impact journals, both good indicators that a paper is worth checking out. It helps you find the quality research. Sciencescape can even assist with finding papers on topics for your undergraduate journal club.

One especially cool feature of Sciencescape is the ability to set up a laboratory profile where the work of lab members can feed into one stream. That way you know what your colleagues at the next lab bench or down the hall are publishing. By breaking down these virtual walls between labs, departments and even universities, Sciencescape facilitates collaborations, which is something Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology has fostered since inception.

The Sciencescape user interface is attractive and easy to read, which entices even someone like me (who is not actively engaged in research) into exploring a topic. It did not take me very long before I had fallen down a rabbit hole of knowledge! You can save papers to a library or share them on social media like Facebook and Twitter, because of course your mom and your college buddies want to know you are keeping up with current research in nanobiotechnology!

Sciencescape was listed by The Scientist magazine as a Top Innovation for 2014, and it is evident as to why. Now if they could only come up with an Eigenfactor metric that would work for music so I could avoid listening to music I probably wouldn’t like. PS, this is not a paid advertisement for Sciencescape, I just thought it seemed really useful. I am now keeping track of several INBT faculty researchers on Sciencescape.

Watch a video on Sciencescape here.

 

For all press inquiries regarding INBT, its faculty and programs, contact INBT’s science writer Mary Spiro, mspiro@jhu.edu or 410-516-4802.

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