Konstantopoulos to present distinguished lecture on tumor cell migration

Biomedical Engineering 8 5 x 11 4-7Biomedical Engineering 8 5 x 11 4-7Biomedical Engineering 8 5 x 11 4-7Professor and Chair of the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Konstantinos Konstantopoulos will present a distinguished lecture for the Department of Biomedical Engineering on Monday, April 7 at 4 p.m. in the Mason Hall Auditorium on the Homewood campus of Johns Hopkins University.  His talk. “Joining Forces with Biology: A Bioengineering Perspective on Tumor Cell Migration,” will reveal some of his laboratory’s current findings on metastasis. The talk is free and open the Johns Hopkins University community. Refreshments follow the lecture.

Here’s the abstract of his talk:

“Understanding the mechanisms of cell migration is a fundamental question in cell, developmental and cancer biology. Unraveling key, physiologically relevant motility mechanisms is also crucial for developing technologies that can control, manipulate, promote or stop cell migration in vivo. Much of what we know about the mechanisms of cell migration stems from in vitro studies using two-dimensional (2D) surfaces. Cell locomotion in 2D is driven by cycles of actin protrusion, integrin-mediated adhesion and myosin-dependent contraction. A major pitfall of 2D assays is that they fail to account for the physical confinement that cells  encounter within the physiological tissue environment. The seminar will challenge the conventional wisdom regarding cell motility mechanisms, and show that migration through physically constricted spaces does not require beta1 integrin dependent adhesion or myosin contractility. Importantly, confined migration persists even when filamentous actin is disrupted. This seminar will also discuss a novel mechanism of confined cell migration based on an osmotic en

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