Q & A: Nanopaprika, the social network for nanoscience

About the same time that Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology (INBT) came into existence, which was May 2006, a network was established online for people interested in all things nano. The International NanoScience Community, or TINC for short, wasn’t some government agency initiative or research center based website, but a social network, much like Facebook, that specialized in helping connect people across the globe interested in reading about, working in, studying or otherwise investing their time in all things nanoscience-related.

nanopaprika-logoI joined TINC in the fall of 2007, shortly after coming to work at INBT. Since I was new to nanotechnology, I thought it might be a good way for me to find out about things going on in the field in a less structured way than reading the journal articles published by the faculty I was writing about. I wasn’t actively conducting research in nanotechnology, but it was interesting to read about what other people were doing across the globe. It helped gain perspective on where Johns Hopkins was in the global nanotech environment. I also thought it would be a good way to get the word out about some of the work INBT researchers were doing.

Over time, I have occasionally posted items and connected with people on TINC. Both TINC and I celebrated six years in nano in 2013, so I thought it would be fun to catch up with András Paszternák, creator and editor of The International NanoScience Community. Here is a short Q&A. Since the URL of TINC is Nanopaprika.eu, Paszternák sometimes just refers to it as Nanopaprika. The site’s tag line says it all “the spicy world of NanoScience,”  and paprika is an important Hungarian spice. Read on!

András Paszternák creator and editor of The International NanoScience Community.

András Paszternák
creator and editor of The International NanoScience Community.

When exactly did TINC start?

On 27th of November 2007, it will be six years old in this month.

What is your goal with TINC?

The main idea was to create something more personal than the other nano networks already on the Internet, something open for students as well as for senior researchers. I was asked by my supervisor Prof. Erika Kalman at the Chemical Research Center of Hungarian Academy of Sciences (Budapest, Hungary) to edit an existing Hungarian nanotech site, but I came up with the idea to create a scientific social network, which could be so much bigger, spreading like a tree and connecting nano scientists across the globe. I have been editing the webpage in my free time along with my professional work as a chemist since the beginning.

Over the last six years, how has TINC attained these goals?

We have today 6,641 members coming from more than 80 countries. Thanks to Nanopaprika, several students have found PhD and postdoctoral positions and found information about new nanotech developments. Senior researchers have met talented students; shared news about their results and found new collaboration partners. Nanopaprika is like an open source to connect nano addicted people and share the latest news in our scientific field.

Why do you think this sort of network is important?

As we can see from Facebook, social networking can really bring people, families and friends closer to each other. I think, next to LinkedIN or ResearchGate (big specific networks with millions of users) small professional networks (like Nanopaprika ) can bring the opportunity to create bonds on a personal level between scientist and students. There is a competition between scientific networks – most researchers don’t like to be registered into several social networks– only the most interesting and most scientific will survive this war. Hopefully, Nanopaprika will be among these.

What do you value most about contributors?

Any news, information is welcome. Some members start just forum topics, others share the abstracts of fresh papers, write blog posts about nanosafety, nanotech education and so forth. A scientific social network is like a LEGO game, everybody can bring their bricks. Just some numbers:  we have 5,090 blog posts, 668 discussions topics, 382 shared nanoevents, 2,208 photos and 387 videos – so Nanopaprika is really a spicy world of nanoscience.

Why should someone join this network?

The door is open for everybody, there is no registration fee, just check www.nanopaprika.eu and if you like it, click on sign In.

By Mary Spiro, INBT science writer.

Comments

  1. Great article! I would like to thank András Paszternák for all his ongoing work for Nanopaprika. It is a great community, large and powerful now, and a great place for students and researchers alike to network. Thanks!!

  2. Nice work done by András Paszternák.

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